Im_Lost
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I have been told that I am eligible for adjustment. How much of the decision to offer adjustment was based on merit as on their website they list contextual criteria e.g.where you live. Also, how much of a big deal is it, is it very difficult to get in through adjustment? How competitive is it?
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mathshooray
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I have been told that I am eligible for adjustment. How much of the decision to offer adjustment was based on merit as on their website they list contextual criteria e.g.where you live.

None of it was based on merit. Everyone with the contextual flags is eligible for adjustment provided they got rejected post interview from Cambridge. Of course getting to interview is a merit in itself, but when you get your grades you can apply through Adjustment. They will consider your performance at interview/previous application as a factor when deciding.

Also, how much of a big deal is it, is it very difficult to get in through adjustment? How competitive is it?

Unfortunately, no one really knows, because this is only the second year it is running. I think about 70 people got in last year. I imagine it is more competitive for subjects with lower standard offers, as more people will meet them. You should have a bit of an advantage if you were pooled before rejection as opposed to rejected directly.
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Doones
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(Original post by Im_Lost)
I have been told that I am eligible for adjustment. How much of the decision to offer adjustment was based on merit as on their website they list contextual criteria e.g.where you live. Also, how much of a big deal is it, is it very difficult to get in through adjustment? How competitive is it?
The Adjustment contextual triggers are the only factors used for eligibility, not merit.
https://www.undergraduate.study.cam.ac.uk/adjustment

Admissions stats about the 2019 scheme (the first time they did it) should be available in May.
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mansnothottt
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(Original post by Doones)
The Adjustment contextual triggers are the only factors used for eligibility, not merit.
https://www.undergraduate.study.cam.ac.uk/adjustment

Admissions stats about the 2019 scheme (the first time they did it) should be available in May.
Question on behalf of someone else:
If someone is rejected without being pooled, but is eligible for adjustment, then are they less likely to be successful that someone (also eligible for adjustment) rejected after pooling?
The thinking being if it is not based on merit, then someone who didn't get pooled is probably not "Cambridge" material in the first place.
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Doones
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(Original post by mansnothottt)
Question on behalf of someone else:
If someone is rejected without being pooled, but is eligible for adjustment, then are they less likely to be successful that someone (also eligible for adjustment) rejected after pooling?
The thinking being if it is not based on merit, then someone who didn't get pooled is probably not "Cambridge" material in the first place.
No that's fine
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