M576 – Motion on the handover of social media data to Psychiatrists Watch

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CoolCavy
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Agreed
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Jammy Duel
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(Original post by The Mogg)
Suppose, but it's done now anyway, nothing colossal will happen from this motion being submitted individually. Bottom line, I was just impatient and couldn't be bothered waiting for days for party approval.
Nope, the TSR government will just ignore it because they want to pretend all the problems in the world are due to evil rich people and businesses and the world would be a much better place if we were all forced to live off the teat of the state
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04MR17
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(Original post by Jammy Duel)
100% of zero is zero, can we see this research?

We're talking about issues that have existed not just for the last decade, if you want to blame social media, nor the last half century if you want to blame video games, nor even the last century if you want to blame cinema and television, we're talking about things that have been true since mass access to popular culture.
Fixed that for you.:borat:

Will source some articles and get back to you tomorrow. :yy:
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Baron of Sealand
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(Original post by The Mogg)
Yes, someone with the name of The Mogg is part of a Labour-Liberal Democrat government.
Well, UKIP was in a government with the Greens and the Liberals...
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Baron of Sealand
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(Original post by Jammy Duel)
Are they more often than not sent by individuals though?
This is not the first time he's submitted a motion without trying to get support from within the party first, so why are you so surprised by this?
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The Mogg
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(Original post by Baron of Sealand)
Well, UKIP was in a government with the Greens and the Liberals...
So now I'm being compared to UKIP, cheers.
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Baron of Sealand
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(Original post by The Mogg)
So now I'm being compared to UKIP, cheers.
Because U are a keeper!
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04MR17
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Jammy, don't know how much access you have to academic databases but I think I'm able to copy and paste the abstract without copyright infringement. Further down I'll put some news articles as well. All of these are studies on the influences on young people caused by television, radio, magazines, print and digital media, gaming etc. The consensus is that young people are susceptible to influence from external forces. That's not me arguing that they don't deserve any responsibility for their actions, that's me arguing that they aren't responsible for every thought they have.

Mass Media Influence on the Musical Preferences of Spanish Adolescents: A Sociological Analysis.
Spoiler:
Show
This paper analyzes the influence of the leading mass media (television, radio, youth magazines and Internet) on the tastes, cultural and musical consumption habits, and life styles of adolescents in Spain. Music plays a very important role in the daily lives of youth and their social and cultural context. Adolescents band together based on their musical preferences, sharing space, entertainment venues, lifestyles, and standards of social interaction [HARGREAVES & NORTH, 1999; NORTH & HARGREAVES, 2007]. Affinity with specific musical styles is used by young people as a sign of identity, a phenomenon that is decades-old, for example, during the 1950s in the United States, when listening to rock and roll was synonymous with youth, rebelliousness and freedom [CRIPPS, 2001]. Asimilar phenomenon is occurring today with the sociomusical behavior of adolescents in Spain [CREMADES, LORENZO & HERRERA, 2010], reinforced by the powerful musical influence of the mass media, television being the leading medium among young people [PINDADO, 2005]. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Young people, social media and connective action: from organisational maintenance to everyday political talk.

Spoiler:
Show
Social media is pervasive in the lives of young people, and this paper critically analyses how politically engaged young people integrate social media use into their existing organisations and political communications. This qualitative research project studied how young people from a broad range of existing political and civic groups use social media for sharing information, mobilisation and, increasingly, as a means to redefine political action and political spaces. Twelve in-person focus groups were conducted in Australia, the USA and the UK with matched affinity groups based on university campuses. The groups were of four types: party political group, issue-based group, identity-based group and social group. Our focus group findings suggest that this in-depth approach to understanding young people's political engagement reveals important group-based differences emerging in young people's citizenship norms: between the dutiful allegiance to formal politics and a more personalised, self-actualising preference for online, discursive forms of political engagement and organising. The ways in which political information is broadcast, shared and talked about on social media by engaged young people demonstrate the importance of communicative forms of action for the future of political engagement and connective action. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Internet addiction among young people in China: Internet connectedness, online gaming, and academic performance decrement.

Spoiler:
Show
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the interrelationships between internet connectedness, online gaming, internet addiction symptoms, and academic performance decrement among the internet-dependent young people in China. Design/methodology/approach – A paper-based survey was conducted among the young clients in one of the earliest and largest internet addiction clinics in China. A total of 594 in-patients (mean age=17.76 y) voluntarily participated in this study. Findings – By adopting the concept of internet connectedness, this study explored the internet use patterns among the young internet addicts, for example, internet café patrons and those who use internet with more goals or higher degree of internet adhesiveness had more internet addiction symptoms. Online gaming was found to play a significant role in the development of internet addiction. As expected, the level of internet addiction is significantly linked to academic performance decrement. Consistent with previous studies, males showed higher degree of internet connectedness and online game usage than females. Noticeably, the moderation effect of online game playing and the mediating effect of internet addiction were also tested. Research limitations/implications – This research is focussed on the internet-dependent group, thus the generalizability of the results need to be interpreted with caution. Practical implications – This study provides insight for parents, educators, health professionals, and policy makers regarding treatment and intervention for internet addiction among young people in China. Originality/value – Since very little research has been done focussing on diagnosed internet-dependent group, this paper scores as a pioneering study of its kind in China. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Video gaming in adolescence: factors associated with leisure time use.

Spoiler:
Show
The geographies of the current generation of young people are markedly distinct from previous generations by virtue of their access to a virtual playground. The vast majority of young people now engage in video gaming as a leisure activity. Drawing on findings from the 2009/2010 WHO Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study this paper set out to investigate the factors that might be associated with higher levels of video gaming. Information was collected from 4404 school students aged 11, 13 and 15 years, using anonymised self-completed questionnaires. Higher usage was defined as game play exceeding two hours a day. Separate analyses were conducted for boys and girls. For both genders higher levels of game playing was associated with early adolescence, opposite sex friends and minimal parental mediation. Bullying and going to bed hungry were associated with higher usage for boys only, while life satisfaction and family activities were linked to girls’ game playing only. Parents were identified as effective mediators of young people’s video game usage. The study identified gendered motivations for higher levels of game play, suggesting different interventions for boys and girls may be required in order for young people to create a balanced approach to video gaming. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Strangers are friends I haven't met yet: a positive approach to young people's use of social media.

Spoiler:
Show
This article reports on a recent research project undertaken in the UK that investigated young people's use of a range of prominent social media tools for socialising and relationship building. The research was conducted by a way of online survey. The findings suggest that this sample of British young people's socialising and relationship-building practices via the range of prominent social media tools reflect similar behavioural categories used offline. The use of these social media tools provides young people with an opportunity to manage, simultaneously, different categories of relationships in a multiplicity of ‘spaces’ created by these tools. The findings challenge the widely held belief that young people expose themselves to risk on social media as they indiscriminately befriend strangers. There is an absence of evidence of ‘unjustified’ intent to harm others. Indeed the findings indicate a strong desire to primarily support and protect those with whom relationships have been carefully established. The research suggests in fact that online engagement through social media can be positive and constructive for young people. It appears to provide them with a challenging ‘space’ to practice identity and relationship management strategies. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Between Responsibility and Positioning: A Study About Young People’s Interactions in Social Media

Spoiler:
Show
This article examines young people’s argumentation about their communication in social media. The purpose is to uncover what is taken for granted in their experiences and illuminate discursive patterns in their representation of everyday life online. Thirty-two youths (14–15 years old) were interviewed. The result shows that there are three discourses involved that in different ways condition the youths’ acting space online. The discourses are called ‘taking responsibility’, ‘saving face’ and ‘social positioning’. There is a struggle between the discourses and they take on different power positions depending on the relation between three parameters: with whom the interaction takes place, the content that is to be published and the online characteristics. The discourse ‘taking responsibility’ is superior in interactions with close friends, unlike interactions with peripheral friends, where ‘social positioning’ is superior. The discourse ‘saving face’ is found in interactions with both close and peripheral friends.


Socio-cultural influences on young people's sexual development

Spoiler:
Show
Emerging evidence indicates that the mechanisms that create health (or ill health) at the population level exist at the intersection between the individual and more “upstream” forces that shape our social contexts. To investigate this proposition, we collected detailed descriptions of youth's perceptions about the socio-cultural and other structural aspects of their contexts that shape their sexual behaviour patterns, and ultimately their health outcomes. In this paper, we examine how social context shaped experiences and perceptions pertaining to sexual behaviour among 18–24 year olds living in two Canadian communities (one rural and one urban).

We investigate explanations for the struggle that youth engage in as they attempt to situate their emergent sexual behaviour patterns within community, family, peer, and broader social contexts. Two central processes appeared to be important to the experiences of youth in the current study and their recollections about their adolescent sexual experiences. These processes are embedded in social norms and structures and are directed at pathologizing sex and silencing meaningful discussion about sex. Together, they interact to create a climate of sex-based shame. The findings of this qualitative study add to previous sociological and feminist research that has also demonstrated how traditional approaches to understanding youth sexual behaviour tend to ignore or discount the “embeddedness” of young people in their social structures and contexts.


Young People, Digital Media, and Engagement: A Meta-Analysis of Research

Spoiler:
Show
New technologies raise fears in public discourse. In terms of digital media use and youth, the advice has been to monitor and limit access to minimize the negative impacts. However, this advice would also limit the positive impacts of digital media. One such positive impact is increased engagement in civic and political life. This article uses meta-analysis techniques to summarize the findings from 106 survey-based studies (965 coefficients) about youth, digital media use, and engagement in civic and political life. In this body of research, there is little evidence to suggest that digital media use is having dire impacts on youth’s engagement. We find that the positive impacts depend on directly political uses of digital media, such as blogging, reading online news, and online political discussion. These online activities have off-line consequences on participation, such as contacting officials, talking politics, volunteering, and protesting. We also find a very strong relationship between online political activities, such as joining political groups and signing petitions, with off-line political activities, which undermine claims of slacktivism among youth. Finally, while research generally assumes a causal flow from digital media to participation, the evidence for the alternative causal flow is strong and has very different implications on interventions designed to address youth’s levels of engagement in civic and political life.




Free access:

How culture, diversity and prior experiences can influence positive youth development

Culture influences young people's self-esteem: Fulfillment of value priorities of other individuals important to youth

How does culture sway teens' well-being?

How culture influences children’s development

Impact of social media and screen-use on young people’s health (House of Commons committee paper)

Young People, Social Media and Health –why we should focus on adult digital literacy

Children in a Digital World (Unicef Report)
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SankaraInBloom
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#29
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#29
I have to say that I agree with the general premise of this motion. Social media companies already hoard our data and skate the boundaries when it comes to GDPR concerns and that's a truly dreadful circumstance. When you add sharing information about vulnerable children with a cohort of mental health issues to the mix, irrespective of who it's going to, you quickly whittle down to a transparent safeguarding nightmare.

This sort of thing isn't about attacking private enterprise - it's about making sure that people are protected and have the right to act as they wish on private platforms without adding a further worry on how those actions will be used elsewhere.
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Joleee
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#30
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#30
is this actually happening or are we just discussing for the sake of discussing? can i please read your source if you have one so i can understand the logistics?

when you say 'children' - do you mean children in general or accounts of specific patients? if it's children in general, it isn't a breach of privacy.

is this to better understand mental health or what is the purpose of providing such data?
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SankaraInBloom
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(Original post by Joleee)
is this actually happening or are we just discussing for the sake of discussing? can i please read your source if you have one so i can understand the logistics?

when you say 'children' - do you mean children in general or accounts of specific patients? if it's children in general, it isn't a breach of privacy.

is this to better understand mental health or what is the purpose of providing such data?
I believe that the idea behind it is meant to be intervention-based, ie psychiatrists can see what's going on on social media and operate from a mental health protection capacity from there. I personally believe this would be a gilt-edged sword, as there's clearly issues surrounding freedom of expression and the invasion of privacy that would extend from that.
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Glaz
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aye aye aye
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Joleee
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#33
(Original post by SankaraInBloom)
I believe that the idea behind it is meant to be intervention-based, ie psychiatrists can see what's going on on social media and operate from a mental health protection capacity from there. I personally believe this would be a gilt-edged sword, as there's clearly issues surrounding freedom of expression and the invasion of privacy that would extend from that.
it's an invasion of privacy if they're looking at specific people. not an invasion if they're analysing children as a whole. i'm all over confused with the meaning of this motion and how any research is carried out.

(btw i'm glad to see you back )
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SankaraInBloom
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(Original post by Joleee)
it's an invasion of privacy if they're looking at specific people. not an invasion if they're analysing children as a whole. i'm all over confused with the meaning of this motion and how any research is carried out.

(btw i'm glad to see you back )
I think this motion itself applies to individual cases where it is deemed that "intervention is necessary" or whatever. A universal study would likely be conducted ethically with consent forms and whatnot, this is more discussing what would happen in the moment with a specific person.

(Thanks for the warm welcome, it's good to be back!)
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Jammy Duel
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(Original post by 04MR17)
Jammy, don't know how much access you have to academic databases but I think I'm able to copy and paste the abstract without copyright infringement. Further down I'll put some news articles as well. All of these are studies on the influences on young people caused by television, radio, magazines, print and digital media, gaming etc. The consensus is that young people are susceptible to influence from external forces. That's not me arguing that they don't deserve any responsibility for their actions, that's me arguing that they aren't responsible for every thought they have.

Mass Media Influence on the Musical Preferences of Spanish Adolescents: A Sociological Analysis.
Spoiler:
Show
This paper analyzes the influence of the leading mass media (television, radio, youth magazines and Internet) on the tastes, cultural and musical consumption habits, and life styles of adolescents in Spain. Music plays a very important role in the daily lives of youth and their social and cultural context. Adolescents band together based on their musical preferences, sharing space, entertainment venues, lifestyles, and standards of social interaction [HARGREAVES & NORTH, 1999; NORTH & HARGREAVES, 2007]. Affinity with specific musical styles is used by young people as a sign of identity, a phenomenon that is decades-old, for example, during the 1950s in the United States, when listening to rock and roll was synonymous with youth, rebelliousness and freedom [CRIPPS, 2001]. Asimilar phenomenon is occurring today with the sociomusical behavior of adolescents in Spain [CREMADES, LORENZO & HERRERA, 2010], reinforced by the powerful musical influence of the mass media, television being the leading medium among young people [PINDADO, 2005]. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Young people, social media and connective action: from organisational maintenance to everyday political talk.

Spoiler:
Show
Social media is pervasive in the lives of young people, and this paper critically analyses how politically engaged young people integrate social media use into their existing organisations and political communications. This qualitative research project studied how young people from a broad range of existing political and civic groups use social media for sharing information, mobilisation and, increasingly, as a means to redefine political action and political spaces. Twelve in-person focus groups were conducted in Australia, the USA and the UK with matched affinity groups based on university campuses. The groups were of four types: party political group, issue-based group, identity-based group and social group. Our focus group findings suggest that this in-depth approach to understanding young people's political engagement reveals important group-based differences emerging in young people's citizenship norms: between the dutiful allegiance to formal politics and a more personalised, self-actualising preference for online, discursive forms of political engagement and organising. The ways in which political information is broadcast, shared and talked about on social media by engaged young people demonstrate the importance of communicative forms of action for the future of political engagement and connective action. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Internet addiction among young people in China: Internet connectedness, online gaming, and academic performance decrement.

Spoiler:
Show
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the interrelationships between internet connectedness, online gaming, internet addiction symptoms, and academic performance decrement among the internet-dependent young people in China. Design/methodology/approach – A paper-based survey was conducted among the young clients in one of the earliest and largest internet addiction clinics in China. A total of 594 in-patients (mean age=17.76 y) voluntarily participated in this study. Findings – By adopting the concept of internet connectedness, this study explored the internet use patterns among the young internet addicts, for example, internet café patrons and those who use internet with more goals or higher degree of internet adhesiveness had more internet addiction symptoms. Online gaming was found to play a significant role in the development of internet addiction. As expected, the level of internet addiction is significantly linked to academic performance decrement. Consistent with previous studies, males showed higher degree of internet connectedness and online game usage than females. Noticeably, the moderation effect of online game playing and the mediating effect of internet addiction were also tested. Research limitations/implications – This research is focussed on the internet-dependent group, thus the generalizability of the results need to be interpreted with caution. Practical implications – This study provides insight for parents, educators, health professionals, and policy makers regarding treatment and intervention for internet addiction among young people in China. Originality/value – Since very little research has been done focussing on diagnosed internet-dependent group, this paper scores as a pioneering study of its kind in China. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Video gaming in adolescence: factors associated with leisure time use.

Spoiler:
Show
The geographies of the current generation of young people are markedly distinct from previous generations by virtue of their access to a virtual playground. The vast majority of young people now engage in video gaming as a leisure activity. Drawing on findings from the 2009/2010 WHO Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study this paper set out to investigate the factors that might be associated with higher levels of video gaming. Information was collected from 4404 school students aged 11, 13 and 15 years, using anonymised self-completed questionnaires. Higher usage was defined as game play exceeding two hours a day. Separate analyses were conducted for boys and girls. For both genders higher levels of game playing was associated with early adolescence, opposite sex friends and minimal parental mediation. Bullying and going to bed hungry were associated with higher usage for boys only, while life satisfaction and family activities were linked to girls’ game playing only. Parents were identified as effective mediators of young people’s video game usage. The study identified gendered motivations for higher levels of game play, suggesting different interventions for boys and girls may be required in order for young people to create a balanced approach to video gaming. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Strangers are friends I haven't met yet: a positive approach to young people's use of social media.

Spoiler:
Show
This article reports on a recent research project undertaken in the UK that investigated young people's use of a range of prominent social media tools for socialising and relationship building. The research was conducted by a way of online survey. The findings suggest that this sample of British young people's socialising and relationship-building practices via the range of prominent social media tools reflect similar behavioural categories used offline. The use of these social media tools provides young people with an opportunity to manage, simultaneously, different categories of relationships in a multiplicity of ‘spaces’ created by these tools. The findings challenge the widely held belief that young people expose themselves to risk on social media as they indiscriminately befriend strangers. There is an absence of evidence of ‘unjustified’ intent to harm others. Indeed the findings indicate a strong desire to primarily support and protect those with whom relationships have been carefully established. The research suggests in fact that online engagement through social media can be positive and constructive for young people. It appears to provide them with a challenging ‘space’ to practice identity and relationship management strategies. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Between Responsibility and Positioning: A Study About Young People’s Interactions in Social Media

Spoiler:
Show
This article examines young people’s argumentation about their communication in social media. The purpose is to uncover what is taken for granted in their experiences and illuminate discursive patterns in their representation of everyday life online. Thirty-two youths (14–15 years old) were interviewed. The result shows that there are three discourses involved that in different ways condition the youths’ acting space online. The discourses are called ‘taking responsibility’, ‘saving face’ and ‘social positioning’. There is a struggle between the discourses and they take on different power positions depending on the relation between three parameters: with whom the interaction takes place, the content that is to be published and the online characteristics. The discourse ‘taking responsibility’ is superior in interactions with close friends, unlike interactions with peripheral friends, where ‘social positioning’ is superior. The discourse ‘saving face’ is found in interactions with both close and peripheral friends.


Socio-cultural influences on young people's sexual development

Spoiler:
Show
Emerging evidence indicates that the mechanisms that create health (or ill health) at the population level exist at the intersection between the individual and more “upstream” forces that shape our social contexts. To investigate this proposition, we collected detailed descriptions of youth's perceptions about the socio-cultural and other structural aspects of their contexts that shape their sexual behaviour patterns, and ultimately their health outcomes. In this paper, we examine how social context shaped experiences and perceptions pertaining to sexual behaviour among 18–24 year olds living in two Canadian communities (one rural and one urban).

We investigate explanations for the struggle that youth engage in as they attempt to situate their emergent sexual behaviour patterns within community, family, peer, and broader social contexts. Two central processes appeared to be important to the experiences of youth in the current study and their recollections about their adolescent sexual experiences. These processes are embedded in social norms and structures and are directed at pathologizing sex and silencing meaningful discussion about sex. Together, they interact to create a climate of sex-based shame. The findings of this qualitative study add to previous sociological and feminist research that has also demonstrated how traditional approaches to understanding youth sexual behaviour tend to ignore or discount the “embeddedness” of young people in their social structures and contexts.


Young People, Digital Media, and Engagement: A Meta-Analysis of Research

Spoiler:
Show
New technologies raise fears in public discourse. In terms of digital media use and youth, the advice has been to monitor and limit access to minimize the negative impacts. However, this advice would also limit the positive impacts of digital media. One such positive impact is increased engagement in civic and political life. This article uses meta-analysis techniques to summarize the findings from 106 survey-based studies (965 coefficients) about youth, digital media use, and engagement in civic and political life. In this body of research, there is little evidence to suggest that digital media use is having dire impacts on youth’s engagement. We find that the positive impacts depend on directly political uses of digital media, such as blogging, reading online news, and online political discussion. These online activities have off-line consequences on participation, such as contacting officials, talking politics, volunteering, and protesting. We also find a very strong relationship between online political activities, such as joining political groups and signing petitions, with off-line political activities, which undermine claims of slacktivism among youth. Finally, while research generally assumes a causal flow from digital media to participation, the evidence for the alternative causal flow is strong and has very different implications on interventions designed to address youth’s levels of engagement in civic and political life.




Free access:

How culture, diversity and prior experiences can influence positive youth development

Culture influences young people's self-esteem: Fulfillment of value priorities of other individuals important to youth

How does culture sway teens' well-being?

How culture influences children’s development

Impact of social media and screen-use on young people’s health (House of Commons committee paper)

Young People, Social Media and Health –why we should focus on adult digital literacy

Children in a Digital World (Unicef Report)
Congratulations: you appear to have provided nothing that contradicts what I said

Paper after paper saying new media means transmission of ideas in new ways, and more effective interconnectedness means more effective transmission of ideas, who ever would have thunk it!
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Miss Maddie
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(Original post by Jammy Duel)
Congratulations: you appear to have provided nothing that contradicts what I said

Paper after paper saying new media means transmission of ideas in new ways, and more effective interconnectedness means more effective transmission of ideas, who ever would have thunk it!
Another case of reading the title before the paper
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04MR17
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(Original post by Jammy Duel)
Congratulations: you appear to have provided nothing that contradicts what I said

Paper after paper saying new media means transmission of ideas in new ways, and more effective interconnectedness means more effective transmission of ideas, who ever would have thunk it!
More effectice transmission of ideas onto young people, who are therefore influenced by it. Unless I'm mistaken, your contention is that all young people are entirely responsible for all of their own thoughts and actions and digital and cultural influences ought not to be blamed for the thoughts and actions of young people because young people are capable of discerning their own thoughts and actions themselves. I've provided plenty of papers arguing that the strength of influence digital and cultural influences play on young people is a significant one, I can only think it logical to suggest that a significant influence on the thoughts and actions of young people shouldn't be given 0 responsibility for that. It's on you to provide some evidence to support your assertions if you want this conversation to continue.
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CatusStarbright
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I wholeheartedly agree with this motion. We need to be acting to keep people's data safe and out of the hands of third parties, whether they be acting with supposedly good intentions or not. The fact that this proposal involves children (in particular) does not change my position on the matter. If anything, their data needs to be kept even more secure.
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Jammy Duel
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(Original post by 04MR17)
More effectice transmission of ideas onto young people, who are therefore influenced by it. Unless I'm mistaken, your contention is that all young people are entirely responsible for all of their own thoughts and actions and digital and cultural influences ought not to be blamed for the thoughts and actions of young people because young people are capable of discerning their own thoughts and actions themselves. I've provided plenty of papers arguing that the strength of influence digital and cultural influences play on young people is a significant one, I can only think it logical to suggest that a significant influence on the thoughts and actions of young people shouldn't be given 0 responsibility for that. It's on you to provide some evidence to support your assertions if you want this conversation to continue.
You are and have consequently provided evidence for the obvious, not against the claims.
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04MR17
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(Original post by Jammy Duel)
You are and have consequently provided evidence for the obvious, not against the claims.
Then perhaps you should more clearly elaborate what you are actually arguing?
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