iamnotkathbut
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I am currently studying chem, maths, and philosophy at a-level and am predicted A*s in all. I am really interested in physical NatSci at Cambridge but wondered how much not having a third science would affect my chances and performance in the entry exam. (I got 9s in my gcse sciences). Should I pursue this or look at chemistry elsewhere?
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Sinnoh
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Definitely check college websites as they may have their own subject requirements.
You will have trouble in the NSAA exam because it's split into maths (which everyone has to do), then you pick two out of physics, chemistry, biology and advanced maths & physics. That's in the multiple choice section; for the second section you'd be fine, you could just do both chemistry questions.
It would probably be easier for you to learn the necessary physics and maths for the advanced maths & physics questions rather than learn A-level biology from scratch.
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iamnotkathbut
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(Original post by Sinnoh)
Definitely check college websites as they may have their own subject requirements.
You will have trouble in the NSAA exam because it's split into maths (which everyone has to do), then you pick two out of physics, chemistry, biology and advanced maths & physics. That's in the multiple choice section; for the second section you'd be fine, you could just do both chemistry questions.
It would probably be easier for you to learn the necessary physics and maths for the advanced maths & physics questions rather than learn A-level biology from scratch.
Thank you for the reply! I have looked at the spec and the physics aspect doesn't seem much harder than gcse. Do you know if it goes much beyond gcse?
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Sinnoh
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(Original post by iamnotkathbut)
Thank you for the reply! I have looked at the spec and the physics aspect doesn't seem much harder than gcse. Do you know if it goes much beyond gcse?
It's aimed at people who would have done mostly AS physics, which doesn't go too far ahead of GCSE (with the main exception of the particle physics and quantum physics topics). Electronics are slightly more complicated, so is mechanics but it's something you could definitely self-teach yourself a bit.
Have a go at some of the physics questions on a past paper and see how much you know.
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iamnotkathbut
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(Original post by Sinnoh)
It's aimed at people who would have done mostly AS physics, which doesn't go too far ahead of GCSE (with the main exception of the particle physics and quantum physics topics). Electronics are slightly more complicated, so is mechanics but it's something you could definitely self-teach yourself a bit.
Have a go at some of the physics questions on a past paper and see how much you know.
Will do! Thank you for the help, I really appreciate it.
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Emily~3695
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What options are you planning to take in first year as many colleges require physics or further maths for physical natsci and biology a level for biological, although you should be fine for options like chemistry
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University of Bath
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(Original post by iamnotkathbut)
I am currently studying chem, maths, and philosophy at a-level and am predicted A*s in all. I am really interested in physical NatSci at Cambridge but wondered how much not having a third science would affect my chances and performance in the entry exam. (I got 9s in my gcse sciences). Should I pursue this or look at chemistry elsewhere?
Hi there,

I am a Bath NatSci student, but I looked in depth at Cambridge (but decided their course wasn't for me), so hopefully I can help

Most universities require that you have physics A-Level to study physics modules, which is the case at Bath - you cannot study physics through NatSci if you don't have physics A-level. However, having had a look at the requirements for Cambridge here, it varies by college but most say "mathematics and physics or chemistry". So it seems physics isn't necessary, but it would definitely be beneficial and make the degree a bit easier (as you will already have a better understanding). I would suggest contacting the admissions team at Cambridge as they'll be able to give you a better, more reliable answer.

With chemistry and maths at A-Level, you have a lot of options at Bath. You could do chemistry, pharmacology, biochemistry and environmental sciences - you just couldn't take biology or physics. The course at Bath is structured like a joint honours (which isn't how the Cambridge one is structured). This means you choose a major and a minor subject, plus an auxiliary/optional module. For example, you could major in chemistry, minor in biochemistry then take something like psychology or management as an auxiliary module. If physical natural sciences are your main interest, then you'd enjoy the inorganic and physical chemistry modules through chemistry. However, if you would want to take pure physics modules, then you would need physics A-level to do that at Bath.

I hope this has helped,
Jessica, a third year Natural Sciences student
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Emily~3695
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(Original post by iamnotkathbut)
I am currently studying chem, maths, and philosophy at a-level and am predicted A*s in all. I am really interested in physical NatSci at Cambridge but wondered how much not having a third science would affect my chances and performance in the entry exam. (I got 9s in my gcse sciences). Should I pursue this or look at chemistry elsewhere?
A lot of applicants may have physics and further maths whereas you have neither so you may struggle, you probably need to check the entry requirements to see what they require
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artful_lounger
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As above, for Cambridge specifically I think it's very unlikely you would be successful with only one science and maths. Normally the expect two sciences and maths or physics and double maths as far as I can tell. For other NatSci courses though you might find them more able to accommodate your options. As far as the NSAA goes though, you might be able to self teach the relevant topics for one of the sections you're missing; I don't know whether this will ameliorate a lack of an A-level in a second science or FM though.
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