Xxz39
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When browsing the internet many people say that engineering is tough and it seems like it’s not as in demand as computer science.

Background : Initially I would like to study computer science but I developed an interest in developing hardware too over time so I am considering mechatronics or electrical engineering.

However, I’m afraid that I won’t find a good job.
I especially don’t want to be a technician because I am not a “hands-on” type of person. I’ve only researched job openings on Glassdoor though and there aren’t many mechatronics jobs. Although there are lots of software development jobs that also accept related technical degree besides computer science but I’m not sure if mechatronics graduates are qualified.
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mnot
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(Original post by Xxz39)
When browsing the internet many people say that engineering is tough and it seems like it’s not as in demand as computer science.

Background : Initially I would like to study computer science but I developed an interest in developing hardware too over time so I am considering mechatronics or electrical engineering.

However, I’m afraid that I won’t find a good job.
I especially don’t want to be a technician because I am not a “hands-on” type of person. I’ve only researched job openings on Glassdoor though and there aren’t many mechatronics jobs. Although there are lots of software development jobs that also accept related technical degree besides computer science but I’m not sure if mechatronics graduates are qualified.
im not sure why you think CompSci is more in demand then engineering. I suggest you read the Shadbolt report.
https://dera.ioe.ac.uk/16232/2/ind-1...y_Redacted.pdf

Essentially Compsci grads from powerhouse unis are highly in demand & receive very high salaries as graduates, however across CompSci as a whole the averages are below that of other STEM subjects.

Engineering requires commitment, as you will have roughly 15-20 hours of contact time a week + more time to complete coursework, revise etc. certainly will have times with high workloads at the backend of term, that said CompSci is no soft degree and will probably require a very similar hours and workload imo.

Your ability to find a good job will not be outlined by which degree you take, but by how hard you work in uni to build a good resume and make yourself an attractive candidate to employers.

Just look at the modules and pick whatever seems more enjoyable to you, if thats mechatronics pick mechatronics, if its electrical engineering do that...
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0le
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Programming skills are in greater demand. I've been looking for jobs and there are TONS that want programming skills. Engineers on the other hand tend to have a broad range of skills and you sometimes can and sometimes can't apply for certain roles.
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ajj2000
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Take a look at what Bath graduates have gone on to do - looks impressive to me:

https://www.bath.ac.uk/publications/...ering-2017.pdf
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0le
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(Original post by ajj2000)
Take a look at what Bath graduates have gone on to do - looks impressive to me:

https://www.bath.ac.uk/publications/...ering-2017.pdf
These are almost meaningless. By the time the individual graduates, the job market may have completely changed.
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999QR
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(Original post by 0le)
These are almost meaningless. By the time the individual graduates, the job market may have completely changed.
true
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