Gettingonboard
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Hi guys,
I am an Alevel student in 2nd year, and I need advice on how to make a REVSION timetable?
I struggle with making a timetable. Also how much should I be revising per day since my exam are coming up in May. I was planning to do 6hrs per day, so 2 hrs for 3 subjects aday. It is ideal to do revise 3 subjects aday or do you think I will burn out? Now it is end of January. I am all prepped up, still making notes on politics from last year.
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Nightwing84
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6 hours a day can be manageable, but you don't have to stick to it religiously. There will be days where you'll have more time/energy, and remember you need to take breaks to get exercise and fresh air.
Try to focus on the QUALITY of your revision rather than the quantity: half an hour of intensive note taking and practice questions is more valuable than staring into space for 2 hours.
2 hours per subject sounds like a good way to balance your time, but some days you may need to spend longer on a particular subject, for example you might want to complete a 2 hour paper and then mark and go through it.
Try thinking in more of a week to week mindset if forcing yourself to do 6 hours a day is overwhelming.
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Gettingonboard
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(Original post by Nightwing84)
6 hours a day can be manageable, but you don't have to stick to it religiously. There will be days where you'll have more time/energy, and remember you need to take breaks to get exercise and fresh air.
Try to focus on the QUALITY of your revision rather than the quantity: half an hour of intensive note taking and practice questions is more valuable than staring into space for 2 hours.
2 hours per subject sounds like a good way to balance your time, but some days you may need to spend longer on a particular subject, for example you might want to complete a 2 hour paper and then mark and go through it.
Try thinking in more of a week to week mindset if forcing yourself to do 6 hours a day is overwhelming.
Hi thank you for you reply,
I am in the process of making a weekly revision and having 2 days of revision for each subject, so 2 days of politics, 2 days of psychology,2 days of business then I have extra day to either do exam paper or if i’ve Missed out any REVSION etc. And going to do at least 3 hrs or revision aday. I just feel soo overwhelmed nd want to get all the information in my head as quick as possible and Ik that sounds bad just want to get it done. also does revision not taking count for REVSION?
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Gettingonboard
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(Original post by Nightwing84)
6 hours a day can be manageable, but you don't have to stick to it religiously. There will be days where you'll have more time/energy, and remember you need to take breaks to get exercise and fresh air.
Try to focus on the QUALITY of your revision rather than the quantity: half an hour of intensive note taking and practice questions is more valuable than staring into space for 2 hours.
2 hours per subject sounds like a good way to balance your time, but some days you may need to spend longer on a particular subject, for example you might want to complete a 2 hour paper and then mark and go through it.
Try thinking in more of a week to week mindset if forcing yourself to do 6 hours a day is overwhelming.
Also I have mocks in March, should I go? Or just stick to my REVSION for the real exams? Buh Ik if I don’t go to these mock exams my teacher will running down to the corridors to catch me!
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Nightwing84
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I just had my mocks and I think it's good to treat your mocks like the real exams, as that way you get the best indicator on how you'll do in May and therefore what you need to study before then. Base your revision for these mocks the same way you plan to revise for the real exams, that way if something isn't working you can change it before it's too late.
Definitely go to your mocks, doing an exam paper under exam conditions is one of the best ways (if not THE best) to prepare for the real thing. After you've done them and got your results, get hold of the mark schemes and see where you've gone wrong, that way you know what you need to do to improve.
The stuff you've got the most wrong is the stuff you need to revise the most, so therefore you don't need to stress about cramming everything into your head at once
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