LXXV
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Hello, I am a GCSE student and I don't really understand the difference between structure and form. Although I know that form(in poetry) is the type of poem for example a sonnet. But would you consider things like Line lengths, Stanzas, Rhythm, Pace a structural device or form?
Thanks in advance.
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FrancescaC2000
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(Original post by maths_is_life)
Hello, I am a GCSE student and I don't really understand the difference between structure and form. Although I know that form(in poetry) is the type of poem for example a sonnet. But would you consider things like Line lengths, Stanzas, Rhythm, Pace a structural device or form?
Thanks in advance.
Form is the "type" of text itself and how it appears in different types of literature - style of writing, genre, narrative PERSPECTIVE (linked to style) etc - these indicate the writer's intentions
Structure is the framework of a text including the sequence of events and how they are told - foreshadowing, repetition, narrative ARC etc

In terms of your poetry part of the question, It massively overlaps so I feel like you could make it either - RHYME SCHEME: - follows a set sonnet-like rhyme scheme to emphasise the unfaltering love = FORM / rhyme scheme falters half way to reflect the love faltering = STRUCTURE. It is a tricky one this and always threw me off
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Tolgash
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(Original post by FrancescaC2000)
It is a tricky one this and always threw me off
The distinction definitely becomes clearer at A Level.

As for maths_is_life's question, stanzas definitely pertain to the form of poetry, and I'd argue that rhythm does too. It's definitely something I'd expect to see in verse, not prose. However, line lengths and pace are structural features as they are not limited to the form that the piece of literature is written in.
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FrancescaC2000
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(Original post by Tolgarda)
The distinction definitely becomes clearer at A Level.
I agree it does - it has to because you have larger set marks for form independently whereas at GCSE, often marks are inclusive of form and structure as one.

But there are still a few 'grey areas' for argument which is annoying.
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Tolgash
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(Original post by FrancescaC2000)
I agree it does - it has to because you have larger set marks for form independently whereas at GCSE, often marks are inclusive of form and structure as one.
Do you? Which spec is this? Our AO2 still includes form and structure. They aren't marked independently for us. And I believe the AOs are identical across all awarding bodies.

(Original post by FrancescaC2000)
But there are still a few 'grey areas' for argument which is annoying.
Fortunately, they are rarer now lol.
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FrancescaC2000
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(Original post by Tolgarda)
Do you? Which spec is this? Our AO2 still includes form and structure. They aren't marked independently for us. And I believe the AOs are identical across all awarding bodies.
I did AQA English Literature.

I don't remember too well but I'm pretty sure we had an AO dedicated to language form and structure as a whole but the marks were divided up so you could not be awarded top band marks if you only spoke about language and structure with no direct focus on form aswell.
Then our other AOs were (on a basic level)
- Relevant ideas and terminology
- Context
- Comparison to other texts
- Creating a debate
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