Lemonsandlime
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Hi,

So I want to go into architecture in the future and so I was wondering which universities (in the UK) would be the best for studying architecture and any tips to get into them.

I’m currently doing GCSEs so I’ve got a while to implement anything I learn from here.
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PQ
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(Original post by Lemonsandlime)
Hi,

So I want to go into architecture in the future and so I was wondering which universities (in the UK) would be the best for studying architecture and any tips to get into them.

I’m currently doing GCSEs so I’ve got a while to implement anything I learn from here.
All riba/arb recognised architecture courses are good. You need to work out which environment and focus for the course is the best match for your interests. The best course is the one you will be able to fulfill your full potential in.

If you can it’s a good idea to try to visit as many universities as possible - particularly their summer shows so that you can see the sort of work (and often the studios) that each course produces.
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Lemonsandlime
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Thank you.
Why are those courses in particular so good compared to others?
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PQ
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(Original post by Lemonsandlime)
Thank you.
Why are those courses in particular so good compared to others?
You can’t become an architect if you don’t study on a riba/arb course (well you can but it’s a massive ballache)
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Psychetechne
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Just so you have a third voice adding to the conversation, but essentially reiterating what PQ has already said... if you think there’s a chance you’ll want to become a registered architect (and it’s illegal in the UK to call yourself an architect if you’re not registered), then the most important thing is to ensure that your programme is ARB-accredited (it does not have to be RIBA-accredited, but most are; I can only think of Leeds which offers an ARB/non-RIBA-accredited programme).

That being said, there are a number of very interesting non-accredited degrees in architecture (for example the Bartlett’s Architecture and Interdisciplinary Studies, or Newcastle’s Architecture and Urban Planning), but these are largely aimed at people interested quite specific careers in architectural and urban research and/or something called alternative practice.

In terms of accredited programmes, the ARB sets out a fairly rigid structure and criteria that universities need to follow; for example:

GC1 Ability to create architectural designs that satisfy both aesthetic and technical requirements.
GC1 The graduate will have the ability to:
.1 prepare and present building design projects of diverse scale, complexity, and type in a variety of contexts, using a range of media, and in response to a brief;
.2 understand the constructional and structural systems, the environmental strategies and the regulatory requirements that apply to the design and construction of a comprehensive design project;
.3 develop a conceptual and critical approach to architectural design that integrates and satisfies the aesthetic aspects of a building and the technical requirements of its construction and the needs of the user.

The result of this is that, in the words of at least one Head of Architecture, 95% of programmes are very similar in content. You will have modules in design and representation, architectural history, building technology, etc., regardless of where you study. How these modules are delivered and the kind of brief you’re given is what varies from place to place, along with the overall focus of a programme (such as whether it is more conceptual or practical).

With this being the case, how do you go about choosing a university? It is of course not the case that just because the content is the same or very similar that the quality will be; universities vary wildly in the strength of their academic staff and the facilities they offer. Visit as many universities you can and reach out to the admissions tutors, the more people you talk to, the more you’ll get a sense of whether a programme is for you. You should also spend the next couple of years learning more about yourself and the things that interest you; architecture and the built environment are very broad fields, don’t try to pin yourself down too early.
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Lemonsandlime
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(Original post by PQ)
You can’t become an architect if you don’t study on a riba/arb course (well you can but it’s a massive ballache)
(Original post by Psychetechne)
Just so you have a third voice adding to the conversation, but essentially reiterating what PQ has already said... if you think there’s a chance you’ll want to become a registered architect (and it’s illegal in the UK to call yourself an architect if you’re not registered), then the most important thing is to ensure that your programme is ARB-accredited (it does not have to be RIBA-accredited, but most are; I can only think of Leeds which offers an ARB/non-RIBA-accredited programme).

That being said, there are a number of very interesting non-accredited degrees in architecture (for example the Bartlett’s Architecture and Interdisciplinary Studies, or Newcastle’s Architecture and Urban Planning), but these are largely aimed at people interested quite specific careers in architectural and urban research and/or something called alternative practice.

In terms of accredited programmes, the ARB sets out a fairly rigid structure and criteria that universities need to follow; for example:

GC1 Ability to create architectural designs that satisfy both aesthetic and technical requirements.
GC1 The graduate will have the ability to:
.1 prepare and present building design projects of diverse scale, complexity, and type in a variety of contexts, using a range of media, and in response to a brief;
.2 understand the constructional and structural systems, the environmental strategies and the regulatory requirements that apply to the design and construction of a comprehensive design project;
.3 develop a conceptual and critical approach to architectural design that integrates and satisfies the aesthetic aspects of a building and the technical requirements of its construction and the needs of the user.

The result of this is that, in the words of at least one Head of Architecture, 95% of programmes are very similar in content. You will have modules in design and representation, architectural history, building technology, etc., regardless of where you study. How these modules are delivered and the kind of brief you’re given is what varies from place to place, along with the overall focus of a programme (such as whether it is more conceptual or practical).

With this being the case, how do you go about choosing a university? It is of course not the case that just because the content is the same or very similar that the quality will be; universities vary wildly in the strength of their academic staff and the facilities they offer. Visit as many universities you can and reach out to the admissions tutors, the more people you talk to, the more you’ll get a sense of whether a programme is for you. You should also spend the next couple of years learning more about yourself and the things that interest you; architecture and the built environment are very broad fields, don’t try to pin yourself down too early.
Thank you, that’s the most useful advice I’ve received yet. I agree that I shouldn’t settle on one option for myself so soon so I have been looking into other options in roughly the same area, but I currently like the idea of becoming an architect more.
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