Drug use should be treated as a mental health issue rather than a criminal offense Watch

Poll: Drug use should be treated as a mental health issue rather than a criminal offense
Yes, it's a mental health issue (11)
64.71%
No, it's a criminal offence (6)
35.29%
MiaNova
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#1
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Do you agree? If so, why?

I am still undecided on this.
I do think drug use is a HUGE issue, but like everyone says there 2 sides to every argument:

To put it simply, there are 2 arguments usually:

Group A:
Drug use is a crime. The individual chooses to consume them thus putting them in a position to harm someone else/themselves.

Group B:
Individuals who consume drugs may do so due to underlying mental health conditions. It's not always so straightforward. There are various factors that go into drug use .(addiction).


Which group are you more likely to agree with? ^
Last edited by MiaNova; 3 weeks ago
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MidgetFever
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As I mentioned on that thread yesterday, I think it's down to context and perhaps the reasons they've resorted to it.
Those that are doing it just for a laugh probably deserve some kind of criminal label, but those that are resorting to it because of other struggles should be supported in trying to kick the habit.

But as always with moral/criminal issues, where do you draw the line?
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londonmyst
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No.
Choosing to buy, consume and possibly supply illegal narcotics is a personal choice to indulge in criminal conduct.
Not a mental illness which does not involve the same element of choice.
Nor criminal action or criminal intent.

That said- of course using some illegal drugs can result in mental health issues, hallucinations or paranoid behaviour.
Most of the direct harm of habitual and recreational narcotics use is to ones own health or body appearance.
Harming third parties is a different issues which may arise under specific circumstances, like choosing to illegally drive a vehicle on the road under the influence of an illegal substance and causing/being involved in an accident.
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NotNotBatman
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#4
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more likely to agree with B, but not entirely.

I think person A is a product of propaganda stemming for many decades who doesn't appreciate the full issue, whilst there are many problems with drugs military style intervention and locking a person in a cage because of use is in my opinion, not the way to deal with it.
In fact before a lot of drugs were made illegal, addiction was not a major social problem and it was used in many over the counter medications.
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juugsailorshawty
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#5
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#5
im bored ive never tried ket before give me some please
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princetonalec
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#6
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#6
The simple answer is that there is no simple answer.
The first issue I have relating to it being a mental health issue are the fact that some people have addictive personalities or disorders which encourage addiction. For example I have ADHD, meaning i'm at a much higher risk than my peers to develop a dependence on alcohol or drugs which will be much harder for me to boot, especially since many affect me differently. I haven't done crack before, but crack allegedly does nothing to the ADHD brain but make it work at the same speed as everyone elses. So, I could see the argument for some people self medicating.
Theres also a question of involvement. I think if someone is seeking out illegal narcotics there is always a reason. People don't just wake up one day and decide they're going to get addicted to smack. These reasons could be mental health issues, could also be just curiosity. It doesn't take an addictive personality to become addicted.
Theres also a question of how much they want to help themselves. I very much subscribe to the idea of addiction being fueled by isolation and depression, but it would be foolish of me to say that there aren't people who use narcotics as party drugs and develop a dependence.
I think the answer is decriminalisation, which contrary to popular belief is not condoning the act of taking drugs. We need better education, we need decriminalisation so people can work through their addictions in safehouses without fear of prosecution, and we need to find ways to help people off of substances.
Do you always have people who just get high because they want to? Of course. These could even be the majority of cases. But I don't care how someone became addicted, I care about them getting better.
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steamed-hams
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#7
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(Original post by londonmyst)
No.
Choosing to buy, consume and possibly supply illegal narcotics is a personal choice to indulge in criminal conduct.
Not a mental illness which does not involve the same element of choice.
Nor criminal action or criminal intent.

That said- of course using some illegal drugs can result in mental health issues, hallucinations or paranoid behaviour.
Most of the direct harm of habitual and recreational narcotics use is to ones own health or body appearance.
Harming third parties is a different issues which may arise under specific circumstances, like choosing to illegally drive a vehicle on the road under the influence of an illegal substance and causing/being involved in an accident.
you aren't considering how addiction works
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Johnny Tightlips
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Decriminalisation definitely. It has reduced drug use and health effects in all the countries it's been tried in.
Making it illegal hasn't reduced demand or made it harder to get- where I am at uni it is ridiculously easy to get drugs. Most of the people there (including me ) don't plan to do them long-term, we just do them to try them. Treat addiction as a medical issue and give a warning to those who aren't addicted (aka young people giving it a try).
Keep supply and dealing illegal. Oh and legalise medicinal weed!
Last edited by Johnny Tightlips; 3 weeks ago
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DiddyDec
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#9
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#9
(Original post by londonmyst)
No.
Choosing to buy, consume and possibly supply illegal narcotics is a personal choice to indulge in criminal conduct.
Not a mental illness which does not involve the same element of choice.
Nor criminal action or criminal intent.

That said- of course using some illegal drugs can result in mental health issues, hallucinations or paranoid behaviour.
Most of the direct harm of habitual and recreational narcotics use is to ones own health or body appearance.
Harming third parties is a different issues which may arise under specific circumstances, like choosing to illegally drive a vehicle on the road under the influence of an illegal substance and causing/being involved in an accident.
I think you should read this.

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publicatio...iction/preface
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the beer
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#10
Drug use isn't a mental health issue, we don't need to worry about someone having an occasional beer or joint, drug abuse however clearly is, neither should be criminal.
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the beer
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#11
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#11
(Original post by Johnny Tightlips)
Oh and legalise medicinal weed!
Already legal
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NotNotBatman
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#12
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(Original post by londonmyst)
No.
Choosing to buy, consume and possibly supply illegal narcotics is a personal choice to indulge in criminal conduct.
Not a mental illness which does not involve the same element of choice.
Nor criminal action or criminal intent.

That said- of course using some illegal drugs can result in mental health issues, hallucinations or paranoid behaviour.
Most of the direct harm of habitual and recreational narcotics use is to ones own health or body appearance.
Harming third parties is a different issues which may arise under specific circumstances, like choosing to illegally drive a vehicle on the road under the influence of an illegal substance and causing/being involved in an accident.
does criminality/legality dictate morality ?
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DiddyDec
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#13
(Original post by the beer)
Already legal
While legal it is nearly impossible to actually get hold of.
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Kitten in boots
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#14
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#14
I strongly support the decriminalisation of drugs.

Sadly this is Conservative Britain. Most voters prefer a paternalistic government that restricts individual liberty.
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iforgotmylogin
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#15
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#15
It depends on whether you see addiction as nature or nurture.
If you see it as nature, it should be illegal, as the only way to combat is with biological treatments - more drugs.
If you see it as nurture, we can use treatments to remove people from environments that cause it.

Addiction in my eyes is natural, making it dangerous to treat. E.g. MMT only stops heroin addiction in a VERY small amount of cases (from memory 3.4%). Therefore, it shouldn't be a mental health issue or legal.
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londonmyst
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#16
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(Original post by steamed-hams)
you aren't considering how addiction works
No.
My focus is upon illegal narcotics criminality and the personal choice to indulge in it.

I've had more than enough experience of: recreational users, habitual users, small time dealers, organised crime gangs that manufacture/import/distribute illegal narcotics, their support networks and the campaigners that advocate for decriminalisation/legalisation or anarchy.
I'm not going to waste my time parroting their favourite grumbles or outraged rhetoric at the fact that national law law does not conform to their demands.
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CoolCavy
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#17
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The druglords and powerful people making hundreds and thousands from this trade are most definitely criminals, as far as i am aware these are the people the police target.
A homeless person hooked on heroin just to make it through the day shouldn't be treated as a criminal, as far as i am aware in mental health services they are not.
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londonmyst
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#18
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#18
(Original post by NotNotBatman)
does criminality/legality dictate morality ?
Secular national law lays down the line identifying the point at which certain action/inaction/conduct is deemed so dangerous/unpleasant/horrifying that anyone who does or conspires with others in the illegality risks arrest, along with a court imposed sanction and criminal record.
As regards english law under ordinary circumstances, I usually concur with 'crime doesn't pay' and 'don't do the crime if you can't do the time'.
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londonmyst
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#19
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(Original post by DiddyDecAlt)
I think you should read this.

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publicatio...iction/preface
I read it in 2018.
I'm not american and have never been to the usa.
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DiddyDec
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(Original post by londonmyst)
I read it in 2018.
I'm not american and have never been to the usa.
The country does not have any effect on the science of addiction :facepalm2:
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