Should I listen to my parents and drop out altogether? Watch

Anonymous #1
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I am in first year of sixth form and I got sick mid way through the year and I want to leave now because there’s nothing I can do about it and I can’t concentrate or remember subject content, shame because I was good before. My parents are saying for me to drop out of college altogether and do nothing with my life. I am 17 and I don’t think leaving altogether and doing nothing is allowed unless you have a valid reason. They say you fell ill so you’re going to have to leave, you’re stressed so don’t bother revising now. Just fail and leave, whatever happens happens for the best. should I listen to their advice?
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PQ
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What would you like to do with your life if you were well?

Have you spoken to anyone at your college?
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aashan21
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In my opinion, staying in school and getting qualifications is the best option for almost anyone as it opens up doors in the future.
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WazzWazz98
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I am in first year of sixth form and I got sick mid way through the year and I want to leave now because there’s nothing I can do about it and I can’t concentrate or remember subject content, shame because I was good before. My parents are saying for me to drop out of college altogether and do nothing with my life. I am 17 and I don’t think leaving altogether and doing nothing is allowed unless you have a valid reason. They say you fell ill so you’re going to have to leave, you’re stressed so don’t bother revising now. Just fail and leave, whatever happens happens for the best. should I listen to their advice?
everyone has setbacks but it doesn't mean you should quit altogether!
speak to teachers, counsellors, your doctor etc, get to the bottom of your health issues and keep on going!
taking a break from your studies could be a last resort but absolutely not quitting!
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by PQ)
What would you like to do with your life if you were well?

Have you spoken to anyone at your college?
Study A levels. I feel like one subject got a bit too much for me even before I got sick though, and that involves spoon feeding at AS (taking out notes from textbook), and I am now considering whether uni is even for me. Somehow wasn’t struggling in the other 2 before I got sick which require reading around.
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PQ
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Study A levels. I feel like one subject got a bit too much for me even before I got sick though, and that involves spoon feeding at AS (taking out notes from textbook), and I am now considering whether uni is even for me. Somehow wasn’t struggling in the other 2 before I got sick which require reading around.
Speak to your college about what would be best. There's no reason you can't take your A levels over 3 years if you've been ill - or maybe swap out the A level you were struggling with for a different subject or qualification completely (maybe something more coursework based like a BTEC - most university courses are mainly based on coursework marks not exams so struggling with A levels isn't a sign that university isn't for you!). It might be that your college will suggest you focus on taking 1 or two of your A levels this year or sit AS exams instead and then finish off over the next year or two - or they might agree that taking a total break and restarting afresh in september would be better.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by WazzWazz98)
everyone has setbacks but it doesn't mean you should quit altogether!
speak to teachers, counsellors, your doctor etc, get to the bottom of your health issues and keep on going!
taking a break from your studies could be a last resort but absolutely not quitting!
Nothing doctors and counsellors etc can do, it’s affecting my daily functioning in every day life too. Gp say not to do it and just sit there, when I know you can’t do that.

I have spoken to teachers and they know I am planning on leaving to escape failing A2. I have BPD so anything I say sort of sounds extreme, but I got My feelings out and berated the one subject that I think triggered it. My teacher is shocked and doesn’t want me to leave because they know when I am well I can do it. It’s a major setback
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ProbablyPallas
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You need to catch up asap. Talk to your teachers about how you can do this effectively.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by PQ)
Speak to your college about what would be best. There's no reason you can't take your A levels over 3 years if you've been ill - or maybe swap out the A level you were struggling with for a different subject or qualification completely (maybe something more coursework based like a BTEC - most university courses are mainly based on coursework marks not exams so struggling with A levels isn't a sign that university isn't for you!). It might be that your college will suggest you focus on taking 1 or two of your A levels this year or sit AS exams instead and then finish off over the next year or two - or they might agree that taking a total break and restarting afresh in september would be better.
I don’t think I can manage studying anymore, I coped fine when I wasn’t sick with A levels, so I am sure btec won’t be too much if I wasn’t ill. I feel like now though a btec might be too much. Only other thing would be an apprenticeship, but that on its own requires part time studying, and usually it’s a btec or another qualification, that would involve throwing away my dream of university. I don’t think I can manage studying and will affect anything I do in life like work life, adult life, physical functioning etc.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by ProbablyPallas)
You need to catch up asap. Talk to your teachers about how you can do this effectively.
My teachers tried helping me but can’t unless it involves telling me the answer. It’s affecting written work too.
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PQ
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I don’t think I can manage studying anymore, I coped fine when I wasn’t sick with A levels, so I am sure btec won’t be too much if I wasn’t ill. I feel like now though a btec might be too much. Only other thing would be an apprenticeship, but that on its own requires part time studying, and usually it’s a btec or another qualification, that would involve throwing away my dream of university. I don’t think I can manage studying and will affect anything I do in life like work life, adult life, physical functioning etc.
If you're struggling to study in person then it might be worth looking into Open University - you could take a module or two just to keep your interest up and stay in touch with studying. Because it's distance learning they're used to students coping with balancing study with illness and if it suits you then you can use the university modules to either stack up to a qualification or degree or to apply for brick space university courses.
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WazzWazz98
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I don’t think I can manage studying anymore, I coped fine when I wasn’t sick with A levels, so I am sure btec won’t be too much if I wasn’t ill. I feel like now though a btec might be too much. Only other thing would be an apprenticeship, but that on its own requires part time studying, and usually it’s a btec or another qualification, that would involve throwing away my dream of university. I don’t think I can manage studying and will affect anything I do in life like work life, adult life, physical functioning etc.
potentially you may wish to take a year out then? but again I would stress that doesn't mean giving up altogether/permanently! I feel like you also need to see a different GP who has more experience with BPD.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by PQ)
If you're struggling to study in person then it might be worth looking into Open University - you could take a module or two just to keep your interest up and stay in touch with studying. Because it's distance learning they're used to students coping with balancing study with illness and if it suits you then you can use the university modules to either stack up to a qualification or degree or to apply for brick space university courses.
Can I look into the open university without A levels?
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ProbablyPallas
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(Original post by Anonymous)
My teachers tried helping me but can’t unless it involves telling me the answer. It’s affecting written work too.
First of all what are you studying? Secondly, if you're off on medical reasons, just drop out and resit the year and take the time to revise what you already know and recover.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by ProbablyPallas)
First of all what are you studying? Secondly, if you're off on medical reasons, just drop out and resit the year and take the time to revise what you already know and recover.
a levels sociology English lit and maths. Good at English and maths, sociology is not for me though, was for me before, now it isn’t. Went wrong even before I got sick but was fine in my other as levels.
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ProbablyPallas
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(Original post by Anonymous)
a levels sociology English lit and maths. Good at English and maths, sociology is not for me though, was for me before, now it isn’t. Went wrong even before I got sick but was fine in my other as levels.
You still need to take a break to recooperate. You're taking difficult subjects, no wonder you're being overwhelmed with content. A Levels move quickly and if you can't catch up, take a break and start the year again.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by ProbablyPallas)
First of all what are you studying? Secondly, if you're off on medical reasons, just drop out and resit the year and take the time to revise what you already know and recover.
Too late to drop out. I have to sit my AS exams and then leave, probably for good.
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ProbablyPallas
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Too late to drop out. I have to sit my AS exams and then leave, probably for good.
No it isn't too late to drop out. Is your school telling you that? Take it up with the exam board.
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meminisse19
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I’m not sure your parents said specifically to ‘drop out and do nothing with your life’.
I’d recommend taking the rest of the year off, try and find a part time job or a short placement to pass the year, and then restart from the beginning of y12 next year, so you are again on level pegging with everybody.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by ProbablyPallas)
No it isn't too late to drop out. Is your school telling you that? Take it up with the exam board.
Yeah my tutor said.
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