Ban of diesel/petrol cars in the future. Agree or think it is a scam? Watch

U33B
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As you may have heard, the government is looking at many ways to tackle environmental issues and pollution and one way is by introducing electric vehicles and getting rid of petrol and diesel vehicles. They have stated vehicles previously thought such as diesel were environmentally friendly is now a serious health hazard and they want to ban diesel and petrol vehicles by 2040. So, I don`t know if anyone is aware, but since last year road tax has gone up by £10-15 in order to slowly discourage people from buying petrol and diesel cars. However recently newly developed petrol and diesel vehicles have improved significantly where they can/have meet/met the low CO2 emissions tests but still the government is persistent on reducing these types of vehicles on the road (read up on RAC and autocar websites). Granted they might not be as efficient as electric vehicles but can be very close. Diesel cars have been in the market for many years mainly because of their advantages such as great fuel economy, long distance journeys, pulling heavy things around with ease and was also encouraged by the government to be used. Trucks, tractors, lorries, most minivans all use diesel engines, so they do have their added benefits. But the government rather than improving these vehicles have totally gone against this and decided getting rid of it seems like a good idea which is completely stupid and wrong. They say electric vehicles are much better because no fuels are used and there is less maintenance required, but how feasible are electric vehicles when there is limited amount of electric ports available in this country? Plus, it can take upwards of 30 minutes and in some cases overnight to charge these vehicles to full whereas filling up petrol/diesel cars can take 5-10 minutes. Yes, it can take longer if you fill up at busy times, but I am calculating from the time you actually fill up to the brim and not the waiting. Also, an average diesel/petrol car is far cheaper than an average electric vehicle so where is the cost saving aspect? Plus, if you charge your electric vehicle at home, I cannot begin to imagine what the electricity bill would be.
Do you think the government is increasing road tax to get more money out of people, or do you think there is a genuine reason? Because previously all the cars which paid £0 (zero) road tax such as tesla cars are now paying £145 a year, for what? My road tax has gone up by £10 so I want to know what are they doing with the extra money. They surely aren`t using it to improve the roads because there are so many potholes everywhere it’s unbelievable and don`t even get me started on road works. They have introduced ultra-low emission zone in London (in the same area as the congestion zone) to tackle air quality and other major cities are thinking of introducing it too. But what about factories and other machines who produce far more pollution than vehicles. You don`t hear about strict rules and regulations on them? We average workers are affected by so many changes in this country that we are constantly thinking about trying to meet these regulations (pleasing the government) so that we don`t get into trouble. Yet other people can easily dodge stuff and not pay a penny which is unfair.
As a student, would you be happy to drive an electric vehicle if universities provided unlimited electric charging ports and helped towards the cost of a buying a car? What if they lowered the tuition fee for your degree as a way of thanking you for helping the environment?
What is your thought, do agree with the governments idea or disagree and why?.
Last edited by U33B; 4 weeks ago
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Johnny Tightlips
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(Original post by U33B)
As you may have heard, the government is looking at many ways to tackle environmental issues and pollution and one way is by introducing electric vehicles and getting rid of petrol and diesel vehicles. They have stated vehicles previously thought such as diesel were environmentally friendly is now a serious health hazard and they want to ban diesel and petrol vehicles by 2040. So, I don`t know if anyone is aware, but since last year road tax has gone up by £10-15 in order to slowly discourage people from buying petrol and diesel cars. However recently newly developed petrol and diesel vehicles have improved significantly where they can/have meet/met the low CO2 emissions tests but still the government is persistent on reducing these types of vehicles on the road (read up on RAC and autocar websites). Granted they might not be as efficient as electric vehicles but can be very close. Diesel cars have been in the market for many years mainly because of their advantages such as great fuel economy, long distance journeys, pulling heavy things around with ease and was also encouraged by the government to be used. Trucks, tractors, lorries, most minivans all use diesel engines, so they do have their added benefits. But the government rather than improving these vehicles have totally gone against this and decided getting rid of it seems like a good idea which is completely stupid and wrong. They say electric vehicles are much better because no fuels are used and there is less maintenance required, but how feasible are electric vehicles when there is limited amount of electric ports available in this country? Plus, it can take upwards of 30 minutes and in some cases overnight to charge these vehicles to full whereas filling up petrol/diesel cars can take 5-10 minutes. Yes, it can take longer if you fill up at busy times, but I am calculating from the time you actually fill up to the brim and not the waiting. Also, an average diesel/petrol car is far cheaper than an average electric vehicle so where is the cost saving aspect? Plus, if you charge your electric vehicle at home, I cannot begin to imagine what the electricity bill would be.
Do you think the government is increasing road tax to get more money out of people, or do you think there is a genuine reason? Because previously all the cars which paid £0 (zero) road tax such as tesla cars are now paying £145 a year, for what? My road tax has gone up by £10 so I want to know what are they doing with the extra money. They surely aren`t using it to improve the roads because there are so many potholes everywhere it’s unbelievable and don`t even get me started on road works. They have introduced ultra-low emission zone in London (in the same area as the congestion zone) to tackle air quality and other major cities are thinking of introducing it too. But what about factories and other machines who produce far more pollution than vehicles. You don`t hear about strict rules and regulations on them? We average workers are affected by so many changes in this country that we are constantly thinking about trying to meet these regulations (pleasing the government) so that we don`t get into trouble. Yet other people can easily dodge stuff and not pay a penny which is unfair.
As a student, would you be happy to drive an electric vehicle if universities provided unlimited electric charging ports and helped towards the cost of a buying a car? What if they lowered the tuition fee for your degree as a way of thanking you for helping the environment?
So what is your thought, do agree with the governments idea or disagree and why?.
The main thing in the future is that people need to be driving less full stop. 80% of transport km last year were from cars and vans and trucks. Public transport should 100% be the future especially in towns and cities and the links between them.
BUT a really large amount of the UK is rural. As someone who used to live in a rural area, the public transport is shocking.
Often it is far too expensive to maintain public transport in these areas. Banning cars will make living in these areas really difficult.
Unless electric cars are improved a lot (cheaper, longer range, faster charge time) they won't be popular in these areas. There needs to be more infrastructure (charging points etc.) too.

Just "banning things" is a really lazy way of governing. They have to make public transport more attractive (cheaper and better) to attract people to use them more then cars.
Last edited by Johnny Tightlips; 4 weeks ago
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U33B
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(Original post by Johnny Tightlips)
The main thing in the future is that people need to be driving less full stop. 80% of transport km last year were from cars and vans and trucks. Public transport should 100% be the future especially in towns and cities and the links between them.
BUT a really large amount of the UK is rural. As someone who used to live in a rural area, the public transport is shocking.
Often it is far too expensive to maintain public transport in these areas. Banning cars will make living in these areas really difficult.
Unless electric cars are improved a lot (cheaper, longer range, faster charge time) they won't be popular in these areas. There needs to be more infrastructure (charging points etc.) too.

Just "banning things" is a really lazy way of governing. They have to make public transport more attractive (cheaper and better) to attract people to use them more then cars.
So, you do agree that banning is not a good idea. Yes, rural areas need more attention because I have heard they also have Wi-Fi issues let alone introducing charging ports. Public transport isn`t always the answer like you have said because some people rely on cars to get to places. What if rather than driving less they improve roads, reduce car insurance, fuel and road tax and encourage people to drive?
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Johnny Tightlips
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(Original post by U33B)
So, you do agree that banning is not a good idea. Yes, rural areas need more attention because I have heard they also have Wi-Fi issues let alone introducing charging ports. Public transport isn`t always the answer like you have said because some people rely on cars to get to places. What if rather than driving less they improve roads, reduce car insurance, fuel and road tax and encourage people to drive?
Nah definitely not. Public transport reduces both congestion and pollution enormously. It's imperative that more people use it with the environmental and population challenges going on nowadays. People should be encouraged to use it and discouraged to drive.

But as I said, ik this won't work in rural areas as most people here have no option but to drive. So driving shouldn't be banned/made really expensive overall. Within urban areas and linking urban areas is where public transport and less driving will work best (along with more cycling).
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IWMTom
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(Original post by U33B)
As you may have heard, the government is looking at many ways to tackle environmental issues and pollution and one way is by introducing electric vehicles and getting rid of petrol and diesel vehicles. They have stated vehicles previously thought such as diesel were environmentally friendly is now a serious health hazard and they want to ban diesel and petrol vehicles by 2040. So, I don`t know if anyone is aware, but since last year road tax has gone up by £10-15 in order to slowly discourage people from buying petrol and diesel cars. However recently newly developed petrol and diesel vehicles have improved significantly where they can/have meet/met the low CO2 emissions tests but still the government is persistent on reducing these types of vehicles on the road (read up on RAC and autocar websites). Granted they might not be as efficient as electric vehicles but can be very close. Diesel cars have been in the market for many years mainly because of their advantages such as great fuel economy, long distance journeys, pulling heavy things around with ease and was also encouraged by the government to be used. Trucks, tractors, lorries, most minivans all use diesel engines, so they do have their added benefits. But the government rather than improving these vehicles have totally gone against this and decided getting rid of it seems like a good idea which is completely stupid and wrong. They say electric vehicles are much better because no fuels are used and there is less maintenance required, but how feasible are electric vehicles when there is limited amount of electric ports available in this country? Plus, it can take upwards of 30 minutes and in some cases overnight to charge these vehicles to full whereas filling up petrol/diesel cars can take 5-10 minutes. Yes, it can take longer if you fill up at busy times, but I am calculating from the time you actually fill up to the brim and not the waiting. Also, an average diesel/petrol car is far cheaper than an average electric vehicle so where is the cost saving aspect? Plus, if you charge your electric vehicle at home, I cannot begin to imagine what the electricity bill would be.
Do you think the government is increasing road tax to get more money out of people, or do you think there is a genuine reason? Because previously all the cars which paid £0 (zero) road tax such as tesla cars are now paying £145 a year, for what? My road tax has gone up by £10 so I want to know what are they doing with the extra money. They surely aren`t using it to improve the roads because there are so many potholes everywhere it’s unbelievable and don`t even get me started on road works. They have introduced ultra-low emission zone in London (in the same area as the congestion zone) to tackle air quality and other major cities are thinking of introducing it too. But what about factories and other machines who produce far more pollution than vehicles. You don`t hear about strict rules and regulations on them? We average workers are affected by so many changes in this country that we are constantly thinking about trying to meet these regulations (pleasing the government) so that we don`t get into trouble. Yet other people can easily dodge stuff and not pay a penny which is unfair.
As a student, would you be happy to drive an electric vehicle if universities provided unlimited electric charging ports and helped towards the cost of a buying a car? What if they lowered the tuition fee for your degree as a way of thanking you for helping the environment?
What is your thought, do agree with the governments idea or disagree and why?.
Just get a less polluting car. My Golf has free VED.
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ThuggerThugger
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Big scam
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bones-mccoy
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My partner is looking at getting a Tesla, he's done the maths and he'll actually be better off financially as it'll cost roughly £7 in electricity for a full tank, he'll get 22p a mile from his company and then more from the govenment for the first 10,000 miles (which he'll do in no time) and he'll also get a benefit in kind as well. It's ideal for him really as he travels a lot for work and the maintenance is largely just tyres and brakes, but I can see why those doing your average city/local commuting aren't too impressed with having to change over to electric.
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AH-64 APACHE
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Surprise Surprise, the clueless corrupt UK politicians are ripping off the populatiom to fund their own interests AGAIN. Internal Combustion Engines will be back, maybe in 2060 running on Biofuel, that's if the government doesn't ban cars, freedom of movement and the right to think differently to them in the meantime.
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AH-64 APACHE
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(Original post by bones-mccoy)
My partner is looking at getting a Tesla, he's done the maths and he'll actually be better off financially as it'll cost roughly £7 in electricity for a full tank, he'll get 22p a mile from his company and then more from the govenment for the first 10,000 miles (which he'll do in no time) and he'll also get a benefit in kind as well. It's ideal for him really as he travels a lot for work and the maintenance is largely just tyres and brakes, but I can see why those doing your average city/local commuting aren't too impressed with having to change over to electric.
Theoretically yes, it could be cheaper, but Teslas have awful build quality and I can 99.7% guarentee (figures from the AA) it will suffer at least 1 major mechanical failure a year.
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princetonalec
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Morally I agree: csrs aren't doing the best to help not only the environment, but also our health.
Logistically (as previously mentioned) too many areas are rural, and it would be childish to act like the infrastructure in the North is at all comparable to how much the South gets.
We have a lot more crucial things to tackle than a ban which would ultimately alienate the North even more.
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Mustafa0605
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#11
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Sad times for whoever invested 3 million pounds in the new Bugatti Chiron if they actually do that (most likely not)
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Surnia
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(Original post by U33B)
As you may have heard, the government is looking at many ways to tackle environmental issues and pollution and one way is by introducing electric vehicles and getting rid of petrol and diesel vehicles. They have stated vehicles previously thought such as diesel were environmentally friendly is now a serious health hazard and they want to ban diesel and petrol vehicles by 2040. So, I don`t know if anyone is aware, but since last year road tax has gone up by £10-15 in order to slowly discourage people from buying petrol and diesel cars.
No, the government has announced that sale of new petrol and diesel cars will be banned by 2040, along with most hybrid cars that use the existing technology. There are no plans to ban them from the roads entirely, and second-hand sales are expected to be unaffected.
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Talon
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We are a long way from being able to ditch petrol and diesel. The infrastructure just isn't there to support it, not all types of vehicles have decent electric alternatives and the prices need to come down. Maybe in 10 years, the situation might be better.
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iMZee
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If the infrastructure is improved within the next 15 years then yea. I'd love to be ripping around in a car with instant torque and virtually free miles. It'll solve the issue for many buyers who want to purchase a fast car but are put off by the fact of low mpg.
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biggyK
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I’d personally be fine with the ban as you could drive a loud petrol with a nice exhaust and actually stand out compared to the fleet of Ev’s

Also less queues at the fuel station so it’s a win win really.
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