After Brexit, can EU citizens live in Britain? Watch

hotchocolate66
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I'm not an EU citizen so Brexit doesnt apply to me when it comes to studying or working in the UK (as overseas have always required Tier 4 visas) but I'm interested in knowing what are the rights of EU citizens like students, prospective students from EU, workers etc.

There's a lot of news going around how EU citizens will be charged international fees, will no longer have freedom of movement, no right to live or study in the UK without a visa etc.

How much of it is true? Some questions I have are:

1) Will freedom of movement for EU citizens be restricted or stopped altogether?

2) Can EU citizens study in UK without a visa?

3) Can they work in the UK and live without a visa?

4) Will EU citizens be charged the same fees as we are charged? Like 16,000 and above ?
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FakeNewsEditor
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1) Stopped altogether.
2) Right now, yes they can but I assume not from 2021 onwards.
3) As above.
4) Almost certainly yes.
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hotchocolate66
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(Original post by FakeNewsEditor)
1) Stopped altogether.
2) Right now, yes they can but I assume not from 2021 onwards.
3) As above.
4) Almost certainly yes.
For the first question, you are saying they cannot enter the country without a visa? 😰
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FakeNewsEditor
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(Original post by hotchocolate66)
For the first question, you are saying they cannot enter the country without a visa? 😰
I assume you meant freedom of movement for workers as defined by the EU.

You'd likely be able to visit as a tourist for a limited time period. After which, you'd definitely require a visa even as a tourist.

But student, worker, permanent resident will require visas for sure. The Brexiters made it clear that was the primary reason they were leaving. All them Romanians and Bulgarians or w/e coming in to get benefits, steal, kill and rape.
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hotchocolate66
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(Original post by FakeNewsEditor)
I assume you meant freedom of movement for workers as defined by the EU.

You'd likely be able to visit as a tourist for a limited time period. After which, you'd definitely require a visa even as a tourist.

But student, worker, permanent resident will require visas for sure. The Brexiters made it clear that was the primary reason they were leaving. All them Romanians and Bulgarians or w/e coming in to get benefits, steal, kill and rape.
It's sad. So the end of the transition date is 31st dec 2020? Or will they take extensions?
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FakeNewsEditor
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(Original post by hotchocolate66)
It's sad. So the end of the transition date is 31st dec 2020? Or will they take extensions?
The end is the 31st yeah.

What will happen beyond that depends on the deal they'll negotiate in the meantime.
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Diplomatic
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After the transition period...

2) No. They'll need a Tier 4 visa like non EU students and will be able to stay in the UK for 2 years afterwards to find a job.

3) No, they'll need the relevant visa (e.g. Tier 2). Treated the same as non EU.

4) They'll be charged the same as non EU students.
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hotchocolate66
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(Original post by Diplomatic)
After the transition period...

2) No. They'll need a Tier 4 visa like non EU students and will be able to stay in the UK for 2 years afterwards to find a job.

3) No, they'll need the relevant visa (e.g. Tier 2). Treated the same as non EU.

4) They'll be charged the same as non EU students.
What about freedom of movement for tourist purposes? Like if some EU citizen wants to come to UK for holidays then we they require a visa like non-EU as well?
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Diplomatic
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(Original post by hotchocolate66)
What about freedom of movement for tourist purposes? Like if some EU citizen wants to come to UK for holidays then we they require a visa like non-EU as well?
UK citizens currently don't need visas to visit a lot of countries outside the EU, usually they're allowed to stay for e.g. 30 days before a visa is necessary. The same applies to many EU countries. After the transition period, most commentators expect a visa will be required for UK and EU citizens to visit each other's country if they want to stay for a while. But there'll probably be a period (e.g. 30 days) where they can stay visa-free. We'll have to wait and see what the outcome is.
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hotchocolate66
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(Original post by Diplomatic)
UK citizens currently don't need visas to visit a lot of countries outside the EU, usually they're allowed to stay for e.g. 30 days before a visa is necessary. The same applies to many EU countries. After the transition period, most commentators expect a visa will be required for UK and EU citizens to visit each other's country if they want to stay for a while. But there'll probably be a period (e.g. 30 days) where they can stay visa-free. We'll have to wait and see what the outcome is.
Sad state of affairs. I made many friends who are all EU and now living in their respective countries but would come to visit me and now it's just sad that it can cause issues for them.
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Miss Maddie
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At the moment the details haven't been finalised. From what we know:

1) Will freedom of movement for EU citizens be restricted or stopped altogether?

Most probably stopped altogether.

2) Can EU citizens study in UK without a visa?

Probably. There's inevitably be a successor scheme to Erasmus (which was ending anyway) the UK joins.

3) Can they work in the UK and live without a visa?

Students probs will. Everyone else will need a visa.

4) Will EU citizens be charged the same fees as we are charged? Like 16,000 and above ?


No one knows - they should be. EU students should be restricted if they're not charged international fees. They're taking up the space British students could have
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Rakas21
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(Original post by hotchocolate66)
I'm not an EU citizen so Brexit doesnt apply to me when it comes to studying or working in the UK (as overseas have always required Tier 4 visas) but I'm interested in knowing what are the rights of EU citizens like students, prospective students from EU, workers etc.

There's a lot of news going around how EU citizens will be charged international fees, will no longer have freedom of movement, no right to live or study in the UK without a visa etc.

How much of it is true? Some questions I have are:

1) Will freedom of movement for EU citizens be restricted or stopped altogether?

2) Can EU citizens study in UK without a visa?

3) Can they work in the UK and live without a visa?

4) Will EU citizens be charged the same fees as we are charged? Like 16,000 and above ?
1) From 2020 EU movement will end and immigration below 25k will largely be culled (basic maths based on who’s come already suggests that might chop of 100,000 of the 600,000 we get).

2) The trade agreement including students is probably more likely than not. They are a pretty small group, disproportionately educated even beforehand and it’s an easy PR win. I would be 75% confident that something like Erasmus will continue.

3) Right now you can apply for permanent citizenship after being in the UK for five years. I imagine that would apply to EU students once they graduate and find a skilled job.

4) As per point 2 if there is a deal including students then fees will be low, if not then fees will be high.
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hotchocolate66
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Wired_1800 please give your inputs
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by hotchocolate66)
Wired_1800 please give your inputs
(Original post by hotchocolate66)
I'm not an EU citizen so Brexit doesnt apply to me when it comes to studying or working in the UK (as overseas have always required Tier 4 visas) but I'm interested in knowing what are the rights of EU citizens like students, prospective students from EU, workers etc.

There's a lot of news going around how EU citizens will be charged international fees, will no longer have freedom of movement, no right to live or study in the UK without a visa etc.

How much of it is true? Some questions I have are:

1) Will freedom of movement for EU citizens be restricted or stopped altogether?

2) Can EU citizens study in UK without a visa?

3) Can they work in the UK and live without a visa?

4) Will EU citizens be charged the same fees as we are charged? Like 16,000 and above ?
I agree with what some of the points raised by other members. A lot of news coverage now is speculation with a sprinkling of scaremongering to keep things interesting.

The first point is that nothing changes during the transition period. Everything remains normal until either we leave the transition period with no future trade deal or we leave with a new agreement.

The future status of EU nationals whether they are students, workers or regular tourists will depend largely on the future agreement. This will also apply to UK nationals moving to the continent. My only worry is that a US trade deal may impair the judgement of UK negotiators and generate a mutually-dangerous agreements without sensible compromises.

From what has been reported, the Government wants a Canada-style trade deal, but the EU may want to play hardball to punish the UK further. I don't agree with this move, as continued hostilities may cause further strain on an already poisonous relationship with our closest neighbours.

A key point that needs to be stressed is that what the average Brexiteer on the street wants such as highly controlled migration, a UK first approach and a more inward looking country may be different to what the UK Government wants and influenced by local national discourse such as the Scotland problem and the Northern Ireland situation. I think UK Government foreign objectives will drive the approach to negotiations whether it is with the EU, US, China, India, Nigeria, Brazil or even Australia.

1) Will freedom of movement for EU citizens be restricted or stopped altogether?

I think it would be restricted but not stopped altogether. This will be largely down to the future agreement. The EU would be keen to maintain some form of movement for EU citizens.

2) Can EU citizens study in UK without a visa?

During the transition period until end of 2020, yes. Afterwards, likely no, depending on the future agreement.

3) Can they work in the UK and live without a visa?

Short-term, yes. After an agreement, probably no. Comments from Number 10 seem to want limited travel access from the EU. Again, dependent on whether the UK can get its way in the negotiations.

4) Will EU citizens be charged the same fees as we are charged? Like 16,000 and above ?

Likely yes, but the EU may introduce an education system to absorb any fee hikes.

PS: These are my speculative opinions. I am not a Government official.
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Wired_1800
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Fullofsurprises
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by hotchocolate66)
1) Will freedom of movement for EU citizens be restricted or stopped altogether?

2) Can EU citizens study in UK without a visa?

3) Can they work in the UK and live without a visa?

4) Will EU citizens be charged the same fees as we are charged? Like 16,000 and above ?
1. It's not clear. Certainly not until after 2020 (and probably not until something like 2022, given that we will probably need another extension) - after that, it's down to negotiation. It can't conceivably be stopped altogether, but I can imagine there being restrictions on rights to work in the UK. Simple travel might require a quick-completion visa and there will probably be rules excluding people with criminal pasts and the like. However, it's hard to say for sure, as on things like the criminal exclusion, the UK has a long history of shouting about it but doing nothing in practical terms.

2. Again, until the end of this year, yes - after that, unclear as yet, although both the Tory government and the EU have said they want Erasmus to continue. After 2021, the UK would have to pay to be in the next 7-year Erasmus programme and that might be a problem.

3. Probably not after the end of 2021 (or later if extended) but again we don't know the precise details yet.

4. If the UK signs up to the next 7-yr Erasmus then yes, but we don't know that yet.
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hotchocolate66
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(Original post by Wired_1800)
I agree with what some of the points raised by other members. A lot of news coverage now is speculation with a sprinkling of scaremongering to keep things interesting.

The first point is that nothing changes during the transition period. Everything remains normal until either we leave the transition period with no future trade deal or we leave with a new agreement.

The future status of EU nationals whether they are students, workers or regular tourists will depend largely on the future agreement. This will also apply to UK nationals moving to the continent. My only worry is that a US trade deal may impair the judgement of UK negotiators and generate a mutually-dangerous agreements without sensible compromises.

From what has been reported, the Government wants a Canada-style trade deal, but the EU may want to play hardball to punish the UK further. I don't agree with this move, as continued hostilities may cause further strain on an already poisonous relationship with our closest neighbours.

A key point that needs to be stressed is that what the average Brexiteer on the street wants such as highly controlled migration, a UK first approach and a more inward looking country may be different to what the UK Government wants and influenced by local national discourse such as the Scotland problem and the Northern Ireland situation. I think UK Government foreign objectives will drive the approach to negotiations whether it is with the EU, US, China, India, Nigeria, Brazil or even Australia.

1) Will freedom of movement for EU citizens be restricted or stopped altogether?

I think it would be restricted but not stopped altogether. This will be largely down to the future agreement. The EU would be keen to maintain some form of movement for EU citizens.

2) Can EU citizens study in UK without a visa?

During the transition period until end of 2020, yes. Afterwards, likely no, depending on the future agreement.

3) Can they work in the UK and live without a visa?

Short-term, yes. After an agreement, probably no. Comments from Number 10 seem to want limited travel access from the EU. Again, dependent on whether the UK can get its way in the negotiations.

4) Will EU citizens be charged the same fees as we are charged? Like 16,000 and above ?

Likely yes, but the EU may introduce an education system to absorb any fee hikes.

PS: These are my speculative opinions. I am not a Government official.
Thanks for the input. Really distressing how UK government has acted.
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hotchocolate66
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
1. It's not clear. Certainly not until after 2020 (and probably not until something like 2022, given that we will probably need another extension) - after that, it's down to negotiation. It can't conceivably be stopped altogether, but I can imagine there being restrictions on rights to work in the UK. Simple travel might require a quick-completion visa and there will probably be rules excluding people with criminal pasts and the like. However, it's hard to say for sure, as on things like the criminal exclusion, the UK has a long history of shouting about it but doing nothing in practical terms.

2. Again, until the end of this year, yes - after that, unclear as yet, although both the Tory government and the EU have said they want Erasmus to continue. After 2021, the UK would have to pay to be in the next 7-year Erasmus programme and that might be a problem.

3. Probably not after the end of 2021 (or later if extended) but again we don't know the precise details yet.

4. If the UK signs up to the next 7-yr Erasmus then yes, but we don't know that yet.
Thanks for the opinions
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by hotchocolate66)
Thanks for the input. Really distressing how UK government has acted.
It is, but the major question is whether we will be able have our cake and eat it. The UK tried to enter the European Economic Community despite French opposition. We got in and refused to abide by many of the key conventions such as common currency, travel area, closer alignment and so on. We tried to change the system from the inside but could not do so, then complained about it. We decided to leave but yet want to keep the benefits but not the burdens.

If you objectively review this journey, i think it is fair for the EU to play hardball.
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Burton Bridge
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(Original post by Wired_1800)
Fullofsurprises
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Keen to get your views.
Sorry for the wait busy mate, my views in what I think will happen or what I hope will happen?


1) Will freedom of movement for EU citizens be restricted or stopped altogether?

I think it will stopped altogether, I honestly dont see how the conservatives can do anything else? They have been falsely claiming to be anti immigration for decades and managing to falsely blame the "left" and the EU for raising immigration figures. I dont see how they can keep freedom of movement and keep their voter base.

What do I want? I think the UK government should be able to control what it wishes to control, therefore I think the EU freedom of movement should cease.

2) Can EU citizens study in UK without a visa? Depending on the future agreement, however the education industry is big business befor the UK economy so I think there will be concessions on this. I hope there will be anyway as long as we favour our own people first.

3) Can they work in the UK and live without a visa?

Currently yes, however not after the withdrawal agreement. What do I want, i think EU immigration should face exactly the same as immigration from the rest of the world, it's time we stopped the institutional prejudice of the EU.

4) Will EU citizens be charged the same fees as we are charged? Like 16,000 and above ?


Yes they will and yes they should
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