My mate says the issue with my car is because of short journeys??? Watch

ThuggerThugger
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Admittedly he does tend to know alot about cars, basically I have an issue with one of the cylinders and he reckons its because I dont drive it enough and diesel cars need to go on the motorway and not built for city driving... now I wasn’t aware that a car was like a dog and needed an exercise regime. Any truth in what he is saying?
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Scotney
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(Original post by ThuggerThugger)
Admittedly he does tend to know alot about cars, basically I have an issue with one of the cylinders and he reckons its because I dont drive it enough and diesel cars need to go on the motorway and not built for city driving... now I wasn’t aware that a car was like a dog and needed an exercise regime. Any truth in what he is saying?
Apparently he is right. Scroll down and look at other threads on this problem. Dpf filters get blocked if you do lots of short journeys.
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TheMcSame
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(Original post by Scotney)
Apparently he is right. Scroll down and look at other threads on this problem. Dpf filters get blocked if you do lots of short journeys.
OP is talking about a cylinder issue though, not a DPF issue. For all we know the OP's car is old enough to not be fitted with a DPF...

It really depends what the cylinder issue is. In fact, more to the point, how does the OP know it's a cylinder issue? Maybe it's a gunked up injector? I'd get a proper mechanic to look it over to see what's what. If it's a gunked up injector, it'll eventually seize in the block (my car had this issue, the injector issue was never picked up until it was really bad because it had always felt rather sluggish and gutless, it wasn't until I noticed it was struggling up a hill at 2K RPMs in 3rd (which it has generally coped with perfectly fine) that I suspected something was up). If that happens, it's a pain in the ass to fix. Not too costly if they can get it out, but if they can't they'll have to snap the injector to get it out, which may well result in your car being a write-off.

But yeah OP, modern diesels do need a bit of a run every now and again if you only do short journeys with them to stop the DPF from clogging up.
Last edited by TheMcSame; 2 weeks ago
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ThuggerThugger
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(Original post by TheMcSame)
OP is talking about a cylinder issue though, not a DPF issue. For all we know the OP's car is old enough to not be fitted with a DPF...

It really depends what the cylinder issue is. In fact, more to the point, how does the OP know it's a cylinder issue? Maybe it's a gunked up injector? I'd get a proper mechanic to look it over to see what's what. If it's a gunked up injector, it'll eventually seize in the block (my car had this issue, the injector issue was never picked up until it was really bad because it had always felt rather sluggish and gutless, it wasn't until I noticed it was struggling up a hill at 2K RPMs in 3rd (which it has generally coped with perfectly fine) that I suspected something was up). If that happens, it's a pain in the ass to fix. Not too costly if they can get it out, but if they can't they'll have to snap the injector to get it out, which may well result in your car being a write-off.

But yeah OP, modern diesels do need a bit of a run every now and again if you only do short journeys with them to stop the DPF from clogging up.
Used one of those meter things that gives car error codes
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barnetlad
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Do you need to do some of these or even all of these short journeys and should you be thinking about having either a petrol car or none at all?
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ThuggerThugger
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(Original post by barnetlad)
Do you need to do some of these or even all of these short journeys and should you be thinking about having either a petrol car or none at all?
Well thats what Im wondering now, I do about 7 miles to work, 7 miles back mon-fri would this be classed as a short journey? Are diesels not meant for this? I don’t really drive unless I have to I still enjoy walking places if I can..
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ajj2000
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(Original post by ThuggerThugger)
Well thats what Im wondering now, I do about 7 miles to work, 7 miles back mon-fri would this be classed as a short journey? Are diesels not meant for this? I don’t really drive unless I have to I still enjoy walking places if I can..
That’s a short journey - especially if driving in slow traffic. You need to take the car for a decent run.
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StriderHort
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Yeah for a 'decent run' I think they mean an hour+ on the motorway basically. I think the engine has to reach a certain temp before it'll start cleaning and they moan if it's interrupted. (a 'little coiled wire' light should come on somewhere)

What error codes is the scanner giving you? 3rd party ones can be tricky/inaccurate to interpret as they don't have the manufactures own software (I've been chasing a phantom cylinder problem around my car for weeks)
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ThuggerThugger
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(Original post by StriderHort)
Yeah for a 'decent run' I think they mean an hour+ on the motorway basically. I think the engine has to reach a certain temp before it'll start cleaning and they moan if it's interrupted. (a 'little coiled wire' light should come on somewhere)

What error codes is the scanner giving you? 3rd party ones can be tricky/inaccurate to interpret as they don't have the manufactures own software (I've been chasing a phantom cylinder problem around my car for weeks)
Would I get this problem in a petrol car?
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StriderHort
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(Original post by ThuggerThugger)
Would I get this problem in a petrol car?
Nah, they don't do the DPF cleaning thing anyway.
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IWMTom
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Diesels are not for driving around town at all.

Either take it to a proper mechanic for a diagnosis or trade it in for a petrol.


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Talon
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You don't need to use the motorway to make a diesel work properly, but you might have issues if 90% of your use is short 5 minute hops around town. I've always been fine using my car mainly for driving to work and back - that is a 25 minute journey on B-roads. It is good to find somewhere to open it up within the speed limit occasionally.
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ThuggerThugger
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(Original post by Talon)
You don't need to use the motorway to make a diesel work properly, but you might have issues if 90% of your use is short 5 minute hops around town. I've always been fine using my car mainly for driving to work and back - that is a 25 minute journey on B-roads. It is good to find somewhere to open it up within the speed limit occasionally.
I’ve never gone above 50 in my car tbh..
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StriderHort
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(Original post by Talon)
You don't need to use the motorway to make a diesel work properly
Yeah I only really mentioned that as a foolproof way to engage the DPF cleaning if you suspect it's not been doing it.
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Nuffles
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(Original post by ThuggerThugger)
I’ve never gone above 50 in my car tbh..
Well there's your problem. Have you ever taken it up to redline on the tach or do you just amble around in town? Diesels are very sooty and oily by nature and that all builds up inside the engine. They are also very thermally efficient so it's hard for them to warm up to operating temperature. They need a good thrashing once a month to get it nice and hot and help blow all the crud out. Taking it up to redline in third when overtaking someone is a good way to let it stretch its legs. Also a couple of hours on the motorway.

If your car is post 2005/2006 it probably has a DPF which will 100% fail if you only ever drive around town. They're a rather expensive fix as well..
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ThuggerThugger
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(Original post by Nuffles)
Well there's your problem. Have you ever taken it up to redline on the tach or do you just amble around in town? Diesels are very sooty and oily by nature and that all builds up inside the engine. They are also very thermally efficient so it's hard for them to warm up to operating temperature. They need a good thrashing once a month to get it nice and hot and help blow all the crud out. Taking it up to redline in third when overtaking someone is a good way to let it stretch its legs. Also a couple of hours on the motorway.

If your car is post 2005/2006 it probably has a DPF which will 100% fail if you only ever drive around town. They're a rather expensive fix as well..
But speed limit tho...
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IWMTom
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(Original post by ThuggerThugger)
But speed limit tho...
There's places with speed limits higher than 50, genius.
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iMZee
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You can get away with a diesel with city driving but it requires to driven for a long time every month or so to ensure the dpf remains unblocked. Either that or a heavy right foot to ensure the dpf gets hot enough to perform passive regeneration. Most manufacturers state to drive in (one gear below top) at 65mph to allow the car to perform an active regen.

If these fail, they can cost upwards of £500 for a reconditioned part alone.
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IWMTom
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(Original post by iMZee)
You can get away with a diesel with city driving but it requires to driven for a long time every month or so to ensure the dpf remains unblocked. Either that or a heavy right foot to ensure the dpf gets hot enough to perform passive regeneration. Most manufacturers state to drive in (one gear below top) at 65mph to allow the car to perform an active regen.

If these fail, they can cost upwards of £500 for a reconditioned part alone.
Active regeneration doesn't require any special driving characteristics - it just injects more fuel to bring the EGTs up.
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williamho
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better take the car to a mechanic to see if it is the DPf problem
or it could be the EGR problem

most cars needs a good run now and again. to heat up and burn the damp moisture whether it is inside the engine, and exhaust pipe being build up with damp .
a car engine is not like a switch : on or off. There are many integral parts which need to be moisture free to be optimise in operation..
And the UK cold wet weather is also different from a hot sunny dry country

so go for a long drive, at least once a month

the DPf - known as diesel particle filter
EGR - air intake valve
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