twinsforever
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#1
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#1
I was just wondering what careers I could do with an Economics or Mathematics degree?
I already know that I can pursue a career as an actuary but I would like other choices. Are my career choices limited by these degrees?
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tucker672
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(Original post by shaunofthedead)
they are soft subjects most probs middle management
So what are "hard" subjects?
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O_RLY?
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(Original post by shaunofthedead)
they are soft subjects most probs middle management
What? Maths and Economics are certainly not soft subjects! :eek:
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O_RLY?
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(Original post by shaunofthedead)
humanities and social sciences
Economics is a social science...and what are you on about? :confused:
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RyanT
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(Original post by shaunofthedead)
humanities and social sciences
Economics is a social science, so you've just contradicted yourself even if you were being sarcastic.
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wizz_kid
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(Original post by shaunofthedead)
they are soft subjects most probs middle management

thts just rubbish. Statistics show that people who do a mathematical degree earn relatively more than those who dont. However, this does not mean that some 1 with a history degree cannot work as an accountant.


Maths and economics are 1 of the most competitive courses in top unis like oxbridge, LSE, imperial etc.

As for the job prospects, with a degree in maths n economics, you can do anything. Literally. From finance to engineering.
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.ACS.
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If you do well, you can pretty much do anything you want.

You could enter into finance, banking, actuarial, or accountancy. You could consider postgraduate study and possibly academia. You could become a statistician or professional economist. The options are endless providing you do well.
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twinsforever
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#8
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Thanks for the advice!
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Foxius
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#9
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This is the money combination.
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prospectivEEconomist
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#10
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Straight economics has the best career statistics.
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kash-falaw
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#11
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I was wondering, is it better (in terms of career opportunities) to do a joint maths/economics degree or just a single maths or economics degree?
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Chartered Insurance Institute
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#12
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Difficult to answer that question unless you know what you're looking to do. In the world of insurance, risk and financial advice, it wouldn't matter what degree you took, provided you got a 2:1. Employers look beyond the subject area and look more at your soft skills.
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Divya1
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Hello,
Thanks for Asking..!!!

No, The career choices are not limited in this field.

In Reality, the merger of mathematics and economics is very useful.

You are already pursuing Actuary.

So other options are -

* Financial Analyst
* Investment banker
* Statistician Attorney
* Accountant
* Banking Jobs
* Economic Researcher
* Professor / Lecturer

I hope it will help you.
Best of Luck
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silent ninja
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I studied MORSE at Warwick so you could say Maths and Economics played a big part. One of my friends became a successful oil trader, but beyond him I found the IB crowd obnoxious and the whole culture cold and egotistical. I looked at finance careers but ultimately found accounting and actuarial work dry - if my accounting and statistics courses were anything to go by. Analyst jobs didn't excite me.

Eventually I realised I'd enjoyed commercial and business aspects the most, and I've always admired the entrepreneurial spirit. Today I work in IT and technology Procurement, handling all the commercial decisions to bring a project to life. It's a fun job, every project is different and you get to work with exciting companies and decide what your organisation should spend their money on. I'll one day top up with an MBA.

Moral of the story is not to let your course or company you work for dictate where your career should head. Control your career. No matter what course you do at uni, embrace as many options as you can. Get out of your comfort zone. Trying to decide a career from armchair and books is a foolhardy task yet that's how society is set up - you simply have no idea what career options are out there if you haven't experienced the working world. I loved maths at school, college and even uni. But by the end of uni I'd realised my career would be elsewhere. Strange but true

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MajorFader
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#15
(Original post by silent ninja)
I studied MORSE at Warwick so you could say Maths and Economics played a big part. One of my friends became a successful oil trader, but beyond him I found the IB crowd obnoxious and the whole culture cold and egotistical. I looked at finance careers but ultimately found accounting and actuarial work dry - if my accounting and statistics courses were anything to go by. Analyst jobs didn't excite me.

Eventually I realised I'd enjoyed commercial and business aspects the most, and I've always admired the entrepreneurial spirit. Today I work in IT and technology Procurement, handling all the commercial decisions to bring a project to life. It's a fun job, every project is different and you get to work with exciting companies and decide what your organisation should spend their money on. I'll one day top up with an MBA.

Moral of the story is not to let your course or company you work for dictate where your career should head. Control your career. No matter what course you do at uni, embrace as many options as you can. Get out of your comfort zone. Trying to decide a career from armchair and books is a foolhardy task yet that's how society is set up - you simply have no idea what career options are out there if you haven't experienced the working world. I loved maths at school, college and even uni. But by the end of uni I'd realised my career would be elsewhere. Strange but true

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What subjects did you study at a level?
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silent ninja
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#16
(Original post by MajorFader)
What subjects did you study at a level?
Maths, Further Maths, Chemistry, Biology and AS Physics (all As). I would love to have studied an arts subject or two but timetables between arts and sciences usually clash and you're left with limited choices.

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Kwame Kwaning
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#17
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Thanks very much
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