how are substances seperated in fractional distillation

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liamlarner
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In fractional distillation how are substances separated in this particular instance Isopropanol(ethanol) and water to separate both substances and collect them as pure substances separated
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username5152032
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A water and ethanol mixture is heated in a flask using an electric heater. Vapour forms in the air above the mixture in the flask.
The boiling point of ethanol is 78°C. Ethanol vapour passes into the condenser, where it is cooled and condensed. Liquid ethanol drips into a beaker.
When most of the ethanol has left, water vapour at 100°C passes into the condenser, where it is cooled and condensed. Liquid water now drips into the beaker.
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Pigster
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(Original post by liamlarner)
In fractional distillation how are substances separated in this particular instance Isopropanol(ethanol) and water to separate both substances and collect them as pure substances separated
You wouldn't use fractional distillation, just the normal one would do.

Fractional would involve boiling everything then having a fractionating tower inside which be different temperatures allowing different fractions (gases that condense at certain temperatures) to condense. Think crude oil - a very complex mixture.

Simple distillation (as hexadentate) described will do nicely.
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liamlarner
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(Original post by Pigster)
You wouldn't use fractional distillation, just the normal one would do.

Fractional would involve boiling everything then having a fractionating tower inside which be different temperatures allowing different fractions (gases that condense at certain temperatures) to condense. Think crude oil - a very complex mixture.

Simple distillation (as hexadentate) described will do nicely.
yes but the question i am answering is asking how it would be separated using fractional distillation
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Pigster
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(Original post by liamlarner)
yes but the question i am answering is asking how it would be separated using fractional distillation
In which case, what I said.

Research frac. dist. of crude oil for more detail.
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