Treatment of Chinese-looking people Watch

Fullofsurprises
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#1
Chinese (or Chinese 'looking' people) in the UK are often ignored and on campuses or in the street tend to be 'invisible' - but Coronavirus gives some white people an excuse to bring out the subdued racism that normally tends to be tucked away.

In the UK
https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...-openly-racist

US cases
https://www.washingtonpost.com/world...iscrimination/

https://time.com/5775716/xenophobia-...s-coronavirus/

Elsewhere in the world
https://www.marketwatch.com/story/no...rus-2020-01-29

We should fight back against this new excuse for a wave of racist behaviour.

Look out for it on your campus. Don't be silent if you see examples.

Be friendly to Chinese students. Show you like them.

This will be affecting many students who are not from China but 'look Chinese' - this applies to people from other E. Asian countries, or students brought up in this country.

Read factual information about Coronavirus. Don't reach for easy prejudices and stereotypes and avoid Facebook, which is spreading misinformation on this subject.
10
reply
1secondsofvamps
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 weeks ago
#2
Coronavirus or not, I've never been "invisible".
Maybe it's the area i live, but wherever i go, people always look at me funny and tend to make racist comments.
4
reply
Fullofsurprises
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#3
(Original post by 1secondsofvamps)
Coronavirus or not, I've never been "invisible".
Maybe it's the area i live, but wherever i go, people always look at me funny and tend to make racist comments.
I'm sorry. It shouldn't happen, but there are a lot of racists around.
0
reply
paul514
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 weeks ago
#4
Since when are people racist to Chinese people other than the same way people take the piss out of the french or Germans
1
reply
Thewanabenerd
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 weeks ago
#5
(Original post by paul514)
Since when are people racist to Chinese people other than the same way people take the piss out of the french or Germans
since coronaviru hit and the 'they eat anything alive' racism kinda joke staring spreading to basically anyone chinese looking who dont even eat dogs in the uk
2
reply
Wired_1800
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 weeks ago
#6
(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Chinese (or Chinese 'looking' people) in the UK are often ignored and on campuses or in the street tend to be 'invisible' - but Coronavirus gives some white people an excuse to bring out the subdued racism that normally tends to be tucked away.

In the UK
https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...-openly-racist

US cases
https://www.washingtonpost.com/world...iscrimination/

https://time.com/5775716/xenophobia-...s-coronavirus/

Elsewhere in the world
https://www.marketwatch.com/story/no...rus-2020-01-29

We should fight back against this new excuse for a wave of racist behaviour.

Look out for it on your campus. Don't be silent if you see examples.

Be friendly to Chinese students. Show you like them.

This will be affecting many students who are not from China but 'look Chinese' - this applies to people from other E. Asian countries, or students brought up in this country.

Read factual information about Coronavirus. Don't reach for easy prejudices and stereotypes and avoid Facebook, which is spreading misinformation on this subject.
I think the important issue is the assumption that anyone from East Asian or with heritage from their region whether they are Japanese, Korea or whatever is considered Chinese.

Some people should be careful in their environment but don't allow their racist tendencies to come out in the open.
0
reply
paul514
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#7
Report 2 weeks ago
#7
(Original post by Thewanabenerd)
since coronaviru hit and the 'they eat anything alive' racism kinda joke staring spreading to basically anyone chinese looking who dont even eat dogs in the uk
A, kind of true.

B, banter
0
reply
Parties
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 weeks ago
#8
People aren't exactly being racist as they are acting out of fear and ignorance and letting them fuel their judgement. So, to some extent, xenophobia, and stereotyping.

But don't worry, it will get worse, I mean, why would it get better? I'm not even saying that to be a jerk or anything, so long as actual bad news and rumours keep on coming, people are going to discriminate even more and avoid many who look even remotely Chinese or areas known to be highly dense with Chinese people. This will also hurt the Chinese economy, so it is in their best interest to sort this out as soon as possible, especially since their homeland is the source of all this.

Honestly, this is a bad situation for them and its seriously and unfairly hurting the rest of the world's image of them.
Last edited by Parties; 2 weeks ago
2
reply
Fullofsurprises
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#9
(Original post by Wired_1800)
I think the important issue is the assumption that anyone from East Asian or with heritage from their region whether they are Japanese, Korea or whatever is considered Chinese.

Some people should be careful in their environment but don't allow their racist tendencies to come out in the open.
Either way the stereotyping and racism are not helpful and are deeply hurtful and isolating to the people affected.
0
reply
Fullofsurprises
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#10
(Original post by Parties)
Honestly, this is a bad situation for them and its seriously and unfairly hurting the rest of the world's image of them.
It will get worse if people surrender to prejudice and fear. We don't have to do that.
0
reply
Wired_1800
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#11
Report 2 weeks ago
#11
(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Either way the stereotyping and racism are not helpful and are deeply hurtful and isolating to the people affected.
I agree
0
reply
Parties
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#12
Report 2 weeks ago
#12
(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
It will get worse if people surrender to prejudice and fear. We don't have to do that.
Oh yeah, we don't, but do you honestly think a lot of people aren't going to do that? Its survival instinct and fear causes irrationality in an attempt to preserve oneself.

I mean, a lot of the Chinese in China have surrendered to it themselves, so the moment they suspect you from being from Wuhan, witchhunts begin. I remember seeing this video two days ago of that very scenario. There was a case of folk literally using metal to block a family from leaving their apartment due to them being suspected of being infected.

Its actually quite a shame really. Incredibly depressing but we'll see where this circus goes from here on.
1
reply
AngeryPenguin
Badges: 18
#13
Report 2 weeks ago
#13
This is absolutely correct. The statistics prove this is unreasonable - 15,000 infections for a population of 1.4 billion means that there is a 0.0001% of any Chinese person having the coronavirus. You are more likely to be killed in a road accident.
2
reply
Quixote.
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#14
Report 2 weeks ago
#14
(Original post by Wired_1800)
I think the important issue is the assumption that anyone from East Asian or with heritage from their region whether they are Japanese, Korea or whatever is considered Chinese.

It's no different in East Asian countries though. I live in Japan. Yesterday a couple of Chinese people got on the train, obviously speaking in Chinese, and you wouldn't believe how quickly the seats around them emptied. Racism is as prevalent in East Asian countries as it is in the West, probably more so to be honest, people just aren't as open about it. It's more of an at home thing than something to be expressed publicly. Outside of the home, it's expressed more through subtle actions than words, like leaving an empty seat next to a foreigner on an otherwise packed train, or an empty apartment that you're enquiring about renting suddenly becoming unavailable when the company realises that your not Japanese. The way that the Japanese news reports on China sometimes, they might as well just say straight up "China's backwards and inferior" and be done with it.

I've been to China as well, and to be honest, it's no different there either.

People love to subtly let you know that you're an outcast if for some reason you don't quite conform, look different, act different. It doesn't just happen to foreign people either. You'd be a fool to presume that Chinese people themselves aren't treating people from Wuhan/Hubei in a similar manner. It's probably worse within China than anywhere else in the world tbh.
Last edited by Quixote.; 2 weeks ago
2
reply
Quixote.
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#15
Report 2 weeks ago
#15
(Original post by AngeryPenguin)
The statistics prove this is unreasonable - 15,000 infections for a population of 1.4 billion means that there is a 0.0001% of any Chinese person having the coronavirus.
If you believe the Chinese media...
1
reply
Em.-.
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#16
Report 2 weeks ago
#16
(Original post by Quixote.)
It's no different in East Asian countries though. I live in Japan. Yesterday a couple of Chinese people got on the train, obviously speaking in Chinese, and you wouldn't believe how quickly the seats around them emptied. Racism is as prevalent in East Asian countries as it is in the West, probably more so to be honest, people just aren't as open about it. It's more of an at home thing than something to be expressed publicly. Outside of the home, it's expressed more through subtle actions than words, like leaving an empty seat next to a foreigner on an otherwise packed train, or an empty apartment that you're enquiring about renting suddenly becoming unavailable when the company realises that your not Japanese. The way that the Japanese news reports on China sometimes, they might as well just say straight up "China's backwards and inferior" and be done with it.

I've been to China as well, and to be honest, it's no different there either.

People love to subtly let you know that you're an outcast if for some reason you don't quite conform, look different, act different. It doesn't just happen to foreign people either. You'd be a fool to presume that Chinese people themselves aren't treating people from Wuhan/Hubei in a similar manner. It's probably worse within China than anywhere else in the world tbh.
I remember seeing something about people demanding passengers from Wuhan on a flight in China be taken off after recognising their accent. And the sign a Japanese shop had up saying no Chinese were allowed. The thing is the people are scared and with the extreme quarantining going on, it’s making the virus look probably more deadly than it is (and now over 20% of those in hospital seem to be in serious or critical condition, so it is deadly). The government are being strict about face masks and avoiding contact, so it makes sense that people hearing this would be cautious. The government wouldn’t be reacting the way they were if they didn’t think it was a big deal. Nevertheless I feel bad for those who are experiencing people avoiding them, it’s horrible.
0
reply
Quixote.
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#17
Report 2 weeks ago
#17
(Original post by Em.-.)
I remember seeing something about people demanding passengers from Wuhan on a flight in China be taken off after recognising their accent. And the sign a Japanese shop had up saying no Chinese were allowed. The thing is the people are scared and with the extreme quarantining going on, it’s making the virus look probably more deadly than it is (and now over 20% of those in hospital seem to be in serious or critical condition, so it is deadly). The government are being strict about face masks and avoiding contact, so it makes sense that people hearing this would be cautious. The government wouldn’t be reacting the way they were if they didn’t think it was a big deal. Nevertheless I feel bad for those who are experiencing people avoiding them, it’s horrible.
The government certainly sprung into action to build that hospital, despite a still relatively low number of infections being officially reported. I've seen Chinese people claiming the true number of infected to be much much higher.

The number of infected here in Japan has passed 20 now, a few of those being amongst the people evacuated from Wuhan. Still pretty low. But my girlfriend attempted to buy some face masks today (not in response to the corona virus, she just uses them whilst teaching or when she has a cold or whatever) and the three stores we went to were completely cleaned out of them. Not sure if that's Japanese people buying them, or Chinese people buying and sending them back to China. But there's a general nervous feeling floating around I think, even though everything seems totally normal on the surface. Japanese people can be a little distrusting of people from the other Asian countries in normal circumstances, so this virus thing probably won't help things.

I was teaching English to a group of primary school age kids at the weekend and one of them was half-Chinese. When he mentioned that he would like to go travelling, the immediate reaction from the others was to warn him against going to China because it was dangerous and he'd get sick. I think the reaction took him by surprise. It's probably bad enough already being half-Chinese in a country that values homogeneity and conformity so highly, without this added on top. Bullying is a very real problem in Japanese schools, since anybody that stands out for any reason can easy find themselves marginalised or targeted. Hopefully the whole situation peaks fairly soon and starts to die down.
0
reply
Wired_1800
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#18
Report 2 weeks ago
#18
(Original post by Quixote.)
It's no different in East Asian countries though. I live in Japan. Yesterday a couple of Chinese people got on the train, obviously speaking in Chinese, and you wouldn't believe how quickly the seats around them emptied. Racism is as prevalent in East Asian countries as it is in the West, probably more so to be honest, people just aren't as open about it. It's more of an at home thing than something to be expressed publicly. Outside of the home, it's expressed more through subtle actions than words, like leaving an empty seat next to a foreigner on an otherwise packed train, or an empty apartment that you're enquiring about renting suddenly becoming unavailable when the company realises that your not Japanese. The way that the Japanese news reports on China sometimes, they might as well just say straight up "China's backwards and inferior" and be done with it.

I've been to China as well, and to be honest, it's no different there either.

People love to subtly let you know that you're an outcast if for some reason you don't quite conform, look different, act different. It doesn't just happen to foreign people either. You'd be a fool to presume that Chinese people themselves aren't treating people from Wuhan/Hubei in a similar manner. It's probably worse within China than anywhere else in the world tbh.
Wow, i think those actions are disgusting? Are you Japanese? I would have assumed that Japan was more open as a society since they are largely more aligned to Western standards.

I agree that xenophobic reactions can occur in different countries and/or regions, but my earlier point was people assuming that everyone from East Asia was automatically Chinese. I was with some friends couple of days ago and I saw how people subtly avoided a group of young Asian women who were speaking English.

Some friends told me that some black people received similar treatment during the Ebola crisis.
1
reply
Wired_1800
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#19
Report 2 weeks ago
#19
(Original post by AngeryPenguin)
This is absolutely correct. The statistics prove this is unreasonable - 15,000 infections for a population of 1.4 billion means that there is a 0.0001% of any Chinese person having the coronavirus. You are more likely to be killed in a road accident.
Do you think the infection started from some Chinese people’s eating habits. I read that some people over there eat bats, rats, dogs, snakes, cats etc and the virus came from one of these sources? Or is it something more sinister?
0
reply
Fullofsurprises
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#20
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#20
(Original post by Quixote.)
The government certainly sprung into action to build that hospital, despite a still relatively low number of infections being officially reported. I've seen Chinese people claiming the true number of infected to be much much higher.

The number of infected here in Japan has passed 20 now, a few of those being amongst the people evacuated from Wuhan. Still pretty low. But my girlfriend attempted to buy some face masks today (not in response to the corona virus, she just uses them whilst teaching or when she has a cold or whatever) and the three stores we went to were completely cleaned out of them. Not sure if that's Japanese people buying them, or Chinese people buying and sending them back to China. But there's a general nervous feeling floating around I think, even though everything seems totally normal on the surface. Japanese people can be a little distrusting of people from the other Asian countries in normal circumstances, so this virus thing probably won't help things.

I was teaching English to a group of primary school age kids at the weekend and one of them was half-Chinese. When he mentioned that he would like to go travelling, the immediate reaction from the others was to warn him against going to China because it was dangerous and he'd get sick. I think the reaction took him by surprise. It's probably bad enough already being half-Chinese in a country that values homogeneity and conformity so highly, without this added on top. Bullying is a very real problem in Japanese schools, since anybody that stands out for any reason can easy find themselves marginalised or targeted. Hopefully the whole situation peaks fairly soon and starts to die down.
I don't doubt that the difficulties of trying to run an authoritarian state whilst obtaining accurate responses to real threats in China have led to poor governmental actions, not to mention the classic fear of loss of face. We also have our own problems here, not least, a lazy, amateurish, ineffective government responding only after the fact, for example with regards to people returning from Wuhan. This isn't surprising given that we have a lazy, indifferent narcissist as national leader, delegating his power to someone who visibly suffers from personality disorders. (Cummings). So China isn't the only place with problems, nor is Japan. We should be doing better. This will of course fall on hard pressed medical staff in an NHS in severe decline.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

People at uni: do initiations (like heavy drinking) put you off joining sports societies?

Yes (229)
67.75%
No (109)
32.25%

Watched Threads

View All