Get this book, and do yourself a really big favour

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David Getling
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#1
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So many of the questions asked on this forum are about the maths side of chemistry. This is covered extremely well in the following book.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Calculation...dp/0582411270/

There's simply no other book to touch it, and any half decent chemistry teacher should be urging his/her students to buy it.

If you put the effort into this book it really will help you a lot!
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Pigster
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(Original post by David Getling)
So many of the questions asked on this forum are about the maths side of chemistry. This is covered extremely well in the following book.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Calculation...dp/0582411270/

There's simply no other book to touch it, and any half decent chemistry teacher should be urging his/her students to buy it.

If you put the effort into this book it really will help you a lot!
Was Clark your maiden name?
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Deggs_14
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That's an old book.
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Kian Stevens
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The maths involved in A-level Chemistry is relatively basic, hence why A-level Maths isn't required; I think the most difficult maths you do in A-level Chemistry is the Arrhenius equation (or the Nernst equation if the specification includes it) but the questions regarding these equations are just a case of reading linear graphs and calculating gradients, and these are fundamental maths skills taught at school
Other than that, the ideal gas equation is probably the second-most difficult bit of maths students will come across, but again this is just fundamental i.e. rearranging equations

Any half-decent Chemistry teacher shouldn't be urging their students to buy old textbooks, but instead they should be teaching the relatively basic maths in a coherent, understandable way (like any teacher should, mind) and encouraging them to go off and practice it...
Last edited by Kian Stevens; 9 months ago
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David Getling
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(Original post by Pigster)
Was Clark your maiden name?
I get absolutely nothing out of students buying this book!
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David Getling
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(Original post by Deggs_14)
That's an old book.
So am I, but I can well and truly wipe the floor with most younger teachers: in three subjects.

This is the best book of it's kind by a very large margin.
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David Getling
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(Original post by Kian Stevens)
The maths involved in A-level Chemistry is relatively basic, hence why A-level Maths isn't required; I think the most difficult maths you do in A-level Chemistry is the Arrhenius equation (or the Nernst equation if the specification includes it) but the questions regarding these equations are just a case of reading linear graphs and calculating gradients, and these are fundamental maths skills taught at school
Other than that, the ideal gas equation is probably the second-most difficult bit of maths students will come across, but again this is just fundamental i.e. rearranging equations

Any half-decent Chemistry teacher shouldn't be urging their students to buy old textbooks, but instead they should be teaching the relatively basic maths in a coherent, understandable way (like any teacher should, mind) and encouraging them to go off and practice it...
You clearly haven't seen this book, and have no idea how much the majority of chemistry students struggle with what it covers extremely well. And, by the way, there are a hell of a lot of really poor chemistry (and maths, and physics) teachers out there. As I've said elsewhere, teaching in the UK is such an awful job (not profession) that few with a decent STEM degree would touch it with a barge pole. So students often get the very bottom of the university barrel. This was very plain to see when I did my PGCE.
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