Get into Teaching
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If you ask the question asked in this thread to the Get into Teaching, Early Engagement advisers, you’d get 11 different answers. The reason for this is that Teacher Training is very ‘hand’s – on’ and vocational in its nature. You need to demonstrate and provide evidence throughout your course that you are able to plan a lesson, teach a lesson and assess the learning that has taken place. You need to do this in two or more different schools too. Since there are no two schools alike, there is no two teacher training experiences alike either.

Therefore, rather than ask ‘What’s the best route?’, it’s better to ask ‘What’s the best provider for me?’ Teacher Training course providers can be Universities or schools who are able to train and accredit QTS (Qualified Teachers Status – the piece of paper that will allow you to be paid as a qualified teacher in a state-maintained school) and perhaps a PGCE too. (PGCE is an academic qualification and usually involves 4/5 written assignments and investigations.) You will need to be practicing your teaching in two or more different schools for at least 2/3 of the whole course. This is typically Sept – June, but does vary a lot between individual provider.

To choose the best provider, you need to research the ones local to you. (DFE Search tool) Contact them and ask the following questions (and others that I may not have thought of!) to make sure that they are going to be the best providers for you to apply to –

- Does the course offer a PGCE in addition to QTS? If so, what are the assignments and deadlines for them?

- When does the course start and finish?

- Who would be my mentor during my course? How often will they be available to me? How experienced are they?

- How long am I on each teaching practice and where are they likely to be?

- What opportunities will there to be to work with children with Special Educational Needs or Disability, English as an Additional Language or those who are Gifted and Talented?

- What opportunities will there be to participate in extra-curricular activities?

- Will you be required to attend a University setting, if so, how often and when?

- How many other students will be on the course?

- What will the expectations for meetings/INSET be?

Choosing your best provider is akin to choosing a pair of new shoes. They need to be comfortable, supportive and suit your own personal style or personality. For example, my reason for getting into teaching was to empower children with different learning needs. I was fortunate that I had a local provider who took this ambition into account and placed me in a school that had a hearing impairment unit within the main-stream setting. My second school was a fully comprehensive school, with a very strong SEND (Special Education Needs and Disabilities) department and my PGCE assignments allowed me to study strategies of supporting children with a diagnosis is ASD, ADHD, ADD, dyslexia, dyspraxia etc. Without this strong foundation, I would have found it difficult to have found my own special place within education.
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FormerTeacher
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(Original post by Get into Teaching)
If you ask the question asked in this thread to the Get into Teaching, Early Engagement advisers, you’d get 11 different answers. The reason for this is that Teacher Training is very ‘hand’s – on’ and vocational in its nature. You need to demonstrate and provide evidence throughout your course that you are able to plan a lesson, teach a lesson and assess the learning that has taken place. You need to do this in two or more different schools too. Since there are no two schools alike, there is no two teacher training experiences alike either.

Therefore, rather than ask ‘What’s the best route?’, it’s better to ask ‘What’s the best provider for me?’ Teacher Training course providers can be Universities or schools who are able to train and accredit QTS (Qualified Teachers Status – the piece of paper that will allow you to be paid as a qualified teacher in a state-maintained school) and perhaps a PGCE too. (PGCE is an academic qualification and usually involves 4/5 written assignments and investigations.) You will need to be practicing your teaching in two or more different schools for at least 2/3 of the whole course. This is typically Sept – June, but does vary a lot between individual provider.

To choose the best provider, you need to research the ones local to you. (DFE Search tool) Contact them and ask the following questions (and others that I may not have thought of!) to make sure that they are going to be the best providers for you to apply to –

- Does the course offer a PGCE in addition to QTS? If so, what are the assignments and deadlines for them?

- When does the course start and finish?

- Who would be my mentor during my course? How often will they be available to me? How experienced are they?

- How long am I on each teaching practice and where are they likely to be?

- What opportunities will there to be to work with children with Special Educational Needs or Disability, English as an Additional Language or those who are Gifted and Talented?

- What opportunities will there be to participate in extra-curricular activities?

- Will you be required to attend a University setting, if so, how often and when?

- How many other students will be on the course?

- What will the expectations for meetings/INSET be?

Choosing your best provider is akin to choosing a pair of new shoes. They need to be comfortable, supportive and suit your own personal style or personality. For example, my reason for getting into teaching was to empower children with different learning needs. I was fortunate that I had a local provider who took this ambition into account and placed me in a school that had a hearing impairment unit within the main-stream setting. My second school was a fully comprehensive school, with a very strong SEND (Special Education Needs and Disabilities) department and my PGCE assignments allowed me to study strategies of supporting children with a diagnosis is ASD, ADHD, ADD, dyslexia, dyspraxia etc. Without this strong foundation, I would have found it difficult to have found my own special place within education.
Great advice! Although route is somewhat important isn't it? I find that more mature applicants or career changers tend to want to spend more time immersed in a school environment, and less time at University so to that end, Core isn't for them. Graduates, from experience, are more comfortable staying in the HEI setting as that is what they're used to. But yes, on the whole I'd agree with 'which provider is best for me?'.
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Get into Teaching
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Great advice! Although route is somewhat important isn't it? I find that more mature applicants or career changers tend to want to spend more time immersed in a school environment, and less time at University so that end, Core isn't for them. Graduates, from experience, are more comfortable staying in the HEI setting as that is what they're used to. But yes, on the whole I'd agree with 'which provider is best for me?'.
Hello!

Thanks, we try our best!

In answer to your question, I argue that 'route' really only describes how the providers gets course places, which institution accredits the course and chooses the two (or more) school placements. I feel that this type of administration knowledge will not help someone choose the best provider for them. Each provider has their own way of delivering the teacher training and so to assume one provider on the same route is the same as another wouldn't help someone to make a really vital decision. A fulfilling teaching career is so dependant on getting the suitable support and experiences during the beginner teacher stage and I really want aspiring teachers to have the best for them.

Jane
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Get into Teaching)
Hello!

Thanks, we try our best!

In answer to your question, I argue that 'route' really only describes how the providers gets course places, which institution accredits the course and chooses the two (or more) school placements. I feel that this type of administration knowledge will not help someone choose the best provider for them. Each provider has their own way of delivering the teacher training and so to assume one provider on the same route is the same as another wouldn't help someone to make a really vital decision. A fulfilling teaching career is so dependant on getting the suitable support and experiences during the beginner teacher stage and I really want aspiring teachers to have the best for them.

Jane
An important point is checking whether you are supernumerary as some programmes put you straight into the classroom. Also check how much support you get in schools - is your mentor just someone who happens to have too many non-contacts!
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