University strikes - what do you think about them as a student? Watch

Poll: Do you think it's right for lecturers to strike?
Yes (552)
46.86%
No (361)
30.65%
I don't care (265)
22.5%
Puddles the Monkey
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More than a million students could be affected by staff walk outs over 2 weeks - 74 universities are facing cancelled lectures and absences.

Are you going to be affected by this? Do you support the people striking? Are you worried about potential impact on your work? What do you think universities should do?
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hallamstudents
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I believe I'm in the cross fire for this. I was in the last ones, too.

Honestly, I stand with the lecturers and understand that it's the only way to make a point. It's a very difficult balancing act though, that I'm losing 2-3 of unobtainable pay for University that I can't redeem by going to lectures/seminars. It's frustrating beyond belief, and always seems to be around the same time that essays and assignments are due in.

Joshua
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MidgetFever
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Honestly, I'm on the fence about the whole thing. I understand why they're doing it and as above, it probably is the only way to get through to universities. At the same time, with university fees being so high, especially for international students, you'd expect to be taught for the entire duration as initially advertised.
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boods8897
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It's taking it out on the students and that isn't fair - we aren't the ones who can have any effect on their pay and yet we are the ones being penalised. When you have to cross a picket line just to go to the library and are told you shouldn't be going in because you should support the lecturers... It's like well we still have deadlines and a degree to pass, I get you're not happy with your pay but at the same time that isn't the fault of students
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Toki the Dumdum
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I support them striking if they want to.

I won't know the real way in which it affects me until my current module leads decide if they're going to (or can) strike. The one before christmas barely affected me as only one lecturer decided to strike.

Even if all my module leads did strike I wouldn't be very concerned tbh. It's not a huge amount of lecture time lost, I'm able to self study fine and the libraries/labs will still be available if needed.
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mnot
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(Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
More than a million students could be affected by staff walk outs over 2 weeks - 74 universities are facing cancelled lectures and absences.

Are you going to be affected by this? Do you support the people striking? Are you worried about potential impact on your work? What do you think universities should do?
Id be very pissed if i was doing my final year and my coursework or dissertation needed support.

I empathise with the staff wanting permanent contracts, but from a university management perspective I understand it makes no sense to provide these to some staff. The reality is the best researchers already have good contracts and they are available to the most deserving, but I am just not informed enough to say where the cut off should be for full time full benefits and contract staff, I think a mix makes sense but where should the line in the sand be is the real question?

Staff always have the option of looking outside of academia for work, they choose not to (which is fair enough if you've been a researcher for 15-20 years but not everyone can be a professor...).
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xDron3
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From a business view, it's atrocious as you're paying over the odds for a service you're temporarily not getting.

From a moral perspective, it's understandable
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Em.-.
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I understand the staff doing what they’re doing but it’s unfortunate for the students. It’s not the students fault and they have degrees to get but at the same time if the staff want to fix things for themselves this is likely the most effective way.

I hope it works out for everyone in the end and the students aren’t harmed. It would be nice if those who already have permanent contracts / no reason to strike provided extra support to the students.

Also fees should be lowered appropriately.
Last edited by Em.-.; 3 weeks ago
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PlantsGalore74
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I agree with the teachers 100%. I've seen the Bristol uni teachers worked to the bone and having to teach lectures to over 400 students, and then classes of up to 30 for seminars - all for minimal pay. The university said they couldn't give pay rises, but found several million to build a new campus to inject MORE students into the university, making the teachers workload insufferable, and a hefty pay packet for the Vice Chancellors of over 250k each. No wonder they want to strike when their basic requirements are being shafted.

It is harsh for those who come to uni to study, but would you rather have an overworked teacher who doesn't give a flying f*** about your grades because they have over 100 other students to care for and a board that refuses to give them the proper benefits someone of their educational stature requires, or would you rather they strike, get their requests approved and be in a better position to provide you with their expertise so you can smash your degree?

I know a guy in Sheffield is suing his uni for the strikes as they affected his teaching and he shouldn't have to pay for untaught time. I think if students support their teachers and then do something similar like the Sheffield guy to show the university that they can't be greedy and take in thousands more students for monetary gain, and then stiff the teachers who are expected to handle the increase of students and expect students to be okay with it, it may provide added benefit.
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the_queen
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I understand their reason and motivation, they are right BUT when they finish the strike they will ask students to be on time with projects, essays, everything even they didn't receive the teaching they paid for a huge amount of money.
In this perspective, universities should reduce the volume of work for students, extend deadlines and be lenient when students dont understand concepts which haven't been taught because of the strike.
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mnot
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(Original post by PlantsGalore74)
I agree with the teachers 100%. I've seen the Bristol uni teachers worked to the bone and having to teach lectures to over 400 students, and then classes of up to 30 for seminars - all for minimal pay. The university said they couldn't give pay rises, but found several million to build a new campus to inject MORE students into the university, making the teachers workload insufferable, and a hefty pay packet for the Vice Chancellors of over 250k each. No wonder they want to strike when their basic requirements are being shafted.

It is harsh for those who come to uni to study, but would you rather have an overworked teacher who doesn't give a flying f*** about your grades because they have over 100 other students to care for and a board that refuses to give them the proper benefits someone of their educational stature requires, or would you rather they strike, get their requests approved and be in a better position to provide you with their expertise so you can smash your degree?

I know a guy in Sheffield is suing his uni for the strikes as they affected his teaching and he shouldn't have to pay for untaught time. I think if students support their teachers and then do something similar like the Sheffield guy to show the university that they can't be greedy and take in thousands more students for monetary gain, and then stiff the teachers who are expected to handle the increase of students and expect students to be okay with it, it may provide added benefit.
Funding doesnt really work like that, universities often get funding for facilities from downers, industry or government organisations these often mean they only get the funding if they put it into a pre-agreed expense such as facilities, research etc.

Yes VC make a lot, they run an organisation with 10,000s of people, compare their salaries to FTSE100 company with 50,000 employees and it seems extremely reasonable.

Teaching is a necessary cost to unis and it makes sense to employ these academics onto contracts from a balance sheet perspective, it would be great if this wasnt the case but it is. Perhaps more staff need to move onto full time basis but its never going to eliminate contract working, it needs to be a sensible balance if someone is doing 40+ hours a week for 30+ weeks of the year they should probably be full time staff member, if this isnt the case contract work makes more sense.

Yes agreed, students should be compensated for teaching lost some unis already do this, unfortunately unis normally only offer a minimal amount which is to be expected tho...
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Airmed
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It happened to me 2 years ago during my dissertation and my final module. My whole department went on strike. My dissertation supervisor was also the module convener for my final module. It was a mess. I needed help on a particular part of my dissertation, a late crisis, and got none.

I get why they strike but it bloody sucks.
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the_queen
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(Original post by mnot)
Funding doesnt really work like that, universities often get funding for facilities from downers, industry or government organisations these often mean they only get the funding if they put it into a pre-agreed expense such as facilities, research etc.

Yes VC make a lot, they run an organisation with 10,000s of people, compare their salaries to FTSE100 company with 50,000 employees and it seems extremely reasonable.

Teaching is a necessary cost to unis and it makes sense to employ these academics onto contracts from a balance sheet perspective, it would be great if this wasnt the case but it is. Perhaps more staff need to move onto full time basis but its never going to eliminate contract working, it needs to be a sensible balance if someone is doing 40+ hours a week for 30+ weeks of the year they should probably be full time staff member, if this isnt the case contract work makes more sense.

Yes agreed, students should be compensated for teaching lost some unis already do this, unfortunately unis normally only offer a minimal amount which is to be expected tho...
The amount of money reimbursed to students means that students still need to self-study the curricullum. Which is not at all what they expected when they applied to unis! They paid to be taught to get a degree, otherwise they would stay at home, studying online without spending such ridiculous amount of money.
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mnot
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(Original post by the_queen)
The amount of money reimbursed to students means that students still need to self-study the curricullum. Which is not at all what they expected when they applied to unis! They paid to be taught to get a degree, otherwise they would stay at home, studying online without spending such ridiculous amount of money.
yes i agree with this point giving students a minimal amount like a £100 does not make up for leaving them without academic support/teaching, i thought that was clear in my last post...
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by the_queen)
The amount of money reimbursed to students means that students still need to self-study the curricullum. Which is not at all what they expected when they applied to unis! They paid to be taught to get a degree, otherwise they would stay at home, studying online without spending such ridiculous amount of money.
Didn't know about being reimbursed???!!! Thought that didn't happen. How can you apply for this/how does it work?? As somebody paying for a student to be at uni I am not best pleased about any of this.
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mnot
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Didn't know about being reimbursed???!!! Thought that didn't happen. How can you apply for this/how does it work?? As somebody paying for a student to be at uni I am not best pleased about any of this.
Depends what uni your at, each case is different, go to student services and ask about compensation.

Im imagining its mostly done by hour of education missed
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the_queen
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Didn't know about being reimbursed???!!! Thought that didn't happen. How can you apply for this/how does it work?? As somebody paying for a student to be at uni I am not best pleased about any of this.
Somebody mentioned in a previous post. Personally I am not happy with reimbursment as students need academic suport in their work, while reimbursment means they have to study by themselves.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
More than a million students could be affected by staff walk outs over 2 weeks - 74 universities are facing cancelled lectures and absences.

Are you going to be affected by this? Do you support the people striking? Are you worried about potential impact on your work? What do you think universities should do?
Is the strike definitely going ahead?
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CoolCavy
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Don't agree with it at all, university is expensive enough as it is. It is insulting to be paying for something that is not given. Teacher strikes at school are different, they are public sector workers and students dont pay to be there in non private schools.
Striking affects nobody except students and we aren't the ones who decide how much our tutors get paid.
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the_queen
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
Don't agree with it at all, university is expensive enough as it is. It is insulting to be paying for something that is not given. Teacher strikes at school are different, they are public sector workers and students dont pay to be there in non private schools.
Striking affects nobody except students and we aren't the ones who decide how much our tutors get paid.
Fully agree! As I said, we pay, they dont provide the teaching they promised, we are forced to study independently without guidance/support/teaching but we are asked to respect deadlines. Not fair, students are the only ones suffering!
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