Do you think e-scooters should be legalised? Watch

GodAtum
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I think they should because I find mine very useful in replacing the bus. But never thought about how blind people could be affected
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-51375903
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StriderHort
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Nah. Is your only reason that you personally like them and don't like busfare? Where are people planning to use them? they're not supposed to be on pavements OR roads right?
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fallen_acorns
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I don't see why they shouldn't be legal to use on roads and cycle paths. They don't seem to pose any more of a risk than a kid cycling to me, unless I'm missing something?

Obviously shouldn't be allowed on the pavements though. But then that doesn't stop cyclists.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by fallen_acorns)
They don't seem to pose any more of a risk than a kid cycling to me, unless I'm missing something?
How many kids cycle at 20 mph, I wonder?
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StriderHort
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(Original post by fallen_acorns)
I don't see why they shouldn't be legal to use on roads and cycle paths. They don't seem to pose any more of a risk than a kid cycling to me, unless I'm missing something?

Obviously shouldn't be allowed on the pavements though. But then that doesn't stop cyclists.
I'm party guessing here...But they have limited speed so won't be safe on standard roads....they would need insurance, and who is going to cover them at a competitive price? And given the amount of push and investment for cycle paths...I don't think any arguments that they are safe on roads will work. (or even that they have a right tbh)

Pavements are obv out, so that leaves cycle paths...I don't know about UK wide, but the ones here aren't consistent, there's plenty of bits where you NEED to enter the road and would then be breaking the law and i think a lot of cyclists would rage at the slow speeds as well.
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Drewski
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(Original post by StriderHort)
I'm party guessing here...But they have limited speed so won't be safe on standard roads....they would need insurance, and who is going to cover them at a competitive price?
Plenty of cyclists pootle along at slow speeds, slower than scooters.

Why would they need insurance? Bikes don't. E-bikes don't.
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StriderHort
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(Original post by Drewski)
Plenty of cyclists pootle along at slow speeds, slower than scooters.

Why would they need insurance? Bikes don't. E-bikes don't.
A motor vehicle on the road should have motor insurance as far as i'm concerned and there are certainly groups who believe cyclists should need some form of insurance.

Hasn't the whole point of cycle lanes spreading through the UK been to get cyclists and cars apart for their own good?
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fallen_acorns
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(Original post by Good bloke)
How many kids cycle at 20 mph, I wonder?
That's interseting because I was guessing the problem would be that they were too slow - as such causing accidents. If the problem is that they can go that quick, what is the risk difference between them and a speed limmited moped, than can only go slightly quicker. If its saftey gear, then that seems like an easy fix.

(Original post by StriderHort)
I'm party guessing here...But they have limited speed so won't be safe on standard roads....they would need insurance, and who is going to cover them at a competitive price? And given the amount of push and investment for cycle paths...I don't think any arguments that they are safe on roads will work. (or even that they have a right tbh)

Pavements are obv out, so that leaves cycle paths...I don't know about UK wide, but the ones here aren't consistent, there's plenty of bits where you NEED to enter the road and would then be breaking the law and i think a lot of cyclists would rage at the slow speeds as well.
For me, as I said in my reply to the other poster. The comparison is between them and a speed limited moped, which go at 25-30mph limmited I think? Unless there is some study/stat that shows they are significantly more dangerous to drive than a moped, I don't see why they shouldn't just be regulated and allowed. Insurance would probably just be filled by a niche company, unless they became wide spread.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by fallen_acorns)
That's interseting because I was guessing the problem would be that they were too slow - as such causing accidents. If the problem is that they can go that quick, what is the risk difference between them and a speed limmited moped, than can only go slightly quicker. If its saftey gear, then that seems like an easy fix.



For me, as I said in my reply to the other poster. The comparison is between them and a speed limited moped, which go at 25-30mph limmited I think? Unless there is some study/stat that shows they are significantly more dangerous to drive than a moped, I don't see why they shouldn't just be regulated and allowed. Insurance would probably just be filled by a niche company, unless they became wide spread.
One problem is that they are silent.

In terms of the public interest they should certainly registered and be given number plates and be insured for third party risks, like mopeds. They should be banned from footpaths and plaza areas altogether. Riders should wear cycling helmets.
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StriderHort
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(Original post by fallen_acorns)
For me, as I said in my reply to the other poster. The comparison is between them and a speed limited moped, which go at 25-30mph limmited I think? Unless there is some study/stat that shows they are significantly more dangerous to drive than a moped, I don't see why they shouldn't just be regulated and allowed. Insurance would probably just be filled by a niche company, unless they became wide spread.
If they're basically to be added to the same category as mopeds in terms of regs and insurance that removes most of my objections, although I'm still a bit dubious of their overall safety. I'm seeing a fair variation in speeds though, some claim top speeds of 15mph and such? That's where I think it gets a bit dicey.

In terms of who would insure, I think I more mean I'd be curious to see if that could and would be offered in a competitive way.

In fairness I should add, as far i'm concerned the whole UK is on the naughty step, no comics, scooters or cocaines.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by StriderHort)
I'm seeing a fair variation in speeds though, some claim top speeds of 15mph and such? That's where I think it gets a bit dicey.
A bit dicey? Take a look here:

https://www.ridetwowheels.com/fastest-electric-scooter/
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StriderHort
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(Original post by Good bloke)
A bit dicey? Take a look here:

https://www.ridetwowheels.com/fastest-electric-scooter/
Oh I know there are FASTER ones, they're dicey for their own totally separate reasons . fallen_acorns is using mopeds with a 30mph odd speed as comparison, but there are scooters marketed as 15-20mph, and as you linked to, a lot are marketed as 40-50mph...I wonder where the UK would fall in terms of restriction and standards?

EDIT - Just to clarify, I'm worried about 15mph because I think it's too slow, not too fast. I didn't make that clear.
Last edited by StriderHort; 2 weeks ago
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Capitalist_Lamb
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Just wanna see a police chase on e-scooters now
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Good bloke
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(Original post by StriderHort)
EDIT - Just to clarify, I'm worried about 15mph because I think it's too slow, not too fast. I didn't make that clear.
Few bikes can sustain 15 mph, so e-scooters that go faster will mix very badly with them.
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StriderHort
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(Original post by Good bloke)
Few bikes can sustain 15 mph, so e-scooters that go faster will mix very badly with them.
No argument there, I'm really not keen on them being on roads at all as I don't think they will mix well with anything. But i'll admit that's partly me flat not liking them.
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(Original post by StriderHort)
No argument there, I'm really not keen on them being on roads at all as I don't think they will mix well with anything. But i'll admit that's partly me flat not liking them.
It was said at the time of the introduction of the Sinclair C5 that its success would be (if it came, which it didn't) a triumph of marketing over the common sense of parents. I think the same applies here, but young adults (19-35) will be making the decision, and I fear they are less able to judge risk (to both themselves and others) than older parents.
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StriderHort
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(Original post by Good bloke)
It was said at the time of the introduction of the Sinclair C5 that its success would be (if it came, which it didn't) a triumph of marketing over the common sense of parents. I think the same applies here, but young adults (19-35) will be making the decision, and I fear they are less able to judge risk (to both themselves and others) than older parents.
Yeah I can see the comparison, MiniMoto bikes come to mind as well. I suspect a lot of parents also simply don't appreciate how far battery motors have come recently, 'how bad could a battery powered scooter be?' sort of thing. (I did commercial lithium power for my graded unit thingy)
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the beer
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Don't see why not if insured.

(Original post by Good bloke)
I think the same applies here, but young adults (19-35) will be making the decision, and I fear they are less able to judge risk (to both themselves and others) than older parents.
Nah, you old gits are just more risk-averse, still ****ing terrible at judging risk.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by the beer)
Don't see why not if insured.


Nah, you old gits are just more risk-averse, still ****ing terrible at judging risk.
You carry on believing that.
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the beer
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(Original post by Good bloke)
You carry on believing that.
I see it every day unfortunately
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