Aliclg74
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What is the difference between the innate, adaptive and humoral immunity? What is natural and what is artifical? I need to explain antibody formation resulting from both of these.
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123vet
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(Original post by Aliclg74)
What is the difference between the innate, adaptive and humoral immunity? What is natural and what is artifical? I need to explain antibody formation resulting from both of these.
Hi Aliclg74👋🏻

An easy way to remember innate and adaptive immunity is to think of them as non-specific and specific.

Innate = non-specific
This means that it involves phagocytes, which recognise the antigen (a small identifying molecule) of a pathogen, and then engulf it, breaking it down so that it can no longer harm the body or invade cells.
The innate immune response does not involve lymphocytes (e.g. B cells) so thus does not involve antibodies being produced.

Adaptive = specific (also called 'acquired')
This time, the antigen on the pathogen is recognised, and because it is recognised, it causes lymphocytes to produce antibodies. If this is the first time the body has encountered this particular antigen, it will take a while to respond with the correct antibody.

Humoral immunity
The immune cells detect the antigen of the pathogen when it is outside of body cells. Contrast this to cell-mediated immunity, where immune cells recognise a body cell that has been invaded, and changed by a pathogen.

Natural vs. artificial (these involve antibody production so are thus ways of classifying the adaptive immune response)
Artificial tends to mean that the body recognises an antigen because this antigen has been artificially introduced to it. A good example is vaccines: when you are given a vaccine, a (usually) attenuated form of a pathogen in injected into you, causing the body to respond by producing antibodies. Because it's the first time the body has "seen" this antigen, it takes a while to get the right antibody, but if you encounter this antigen a second time (e.g. you get infected with the disease you were vaccinated for) then your body will respond much quicker, producing the right antibodies (and lots of them).

Natural just means the opposite - immunity acquired through non-artificial means. This could be active (i.e. you get infected, your body takes time to respond, then forms memory cells which ensure the correct antibodies can be quickly produced when you get infected next time around) or passive (i.e. antibodies pass through colostrum (first milk babies drink) providing them with short-term immunity.

I've tried to simplify this a bit - immunity is hugely interesting but also very complex! - but it's hard to know how much you will need to know, so let me know if something doesn't make sense or if you need clarification/more detail xx
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Aliclg74
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Report Thread starter 8 months ago
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(Original post by 123vet)
Hi Aliclg74👋🏻

An easy way to remember innate and adaptive immunity is to think of them as non-specific and specific.

Innate = non-specific
This means that it involves phagocytes, which recognise the antigen (a small identifying molecule) of a pathogen, and then engulf it, breaking it down so that it can no longer harm the body or invade cells.
The innate immune response does not involve lymphocytes (e.g. B cells) so thus does not involve antibodies being produced.

Adaptive = specific (also called 'acquired')
This time, the antigen on the pathogen is recognised, and because it is recognised, it causes lymphocytes to produce antibodies. If this is the first time the body has encountered this particular antigen, it will take a while to respond with the correct antibody.

Humoral immunity
The immune cells detect the antigen of the pathogen when it is outside of body cells. Contrast this to cell-mediated immunity, where immune cells recognise a body cell that has been invaded, and changed by a pathogen.

Natural vs. artificial (these involve antibody production so are thus ways of classifying the adaptive immune response)
Artificial tends to mean that the body recognises an antigen because this antigen has been artificially introduced to it. A good example is vaccines: when you are given a vaccine, a (usually) attenuated form of a pathogen in injected into you, causing the body to respond by producing antibodies. Because it's the first time the body has "seen" this antigen, it takes a while to get the right antibody, but if you encounter this antigen a second time (e.g. you get infected with the disease you were vaccinated for) then your body will respond much quicker, producing the right antibodies (and lots of them).

Natural just means the opposite - immunity acquired through non-artificial means. This could be active (i.e. you get infected, your body takes time to respond, then forms memory cells which ensure the correct antibodies can be quickly produced when you get infected next time around) or passive (i.e. antibodies pass through colostrum (first milk babies drink) providing them with short-term immunity.

I've tried to simplify this a bit - immunity is hugely interesting but also very complex! - but it's hard to know how much you will need to know, so let me know if something doesn't make sense or if you need clarification/more detail xx
Thank you, How do I explain antibody formation resulting both natural and artifical exposure to antigens?
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