ProbablyPallas
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(Original post by vicvic38)
I did new GCSEs, and a mix of old and new A levels. They're not any harder. It's something the kids today are saying because they want to seem like big men.
So did I, and statistically it is easier to get higher grades doing modular GCSEs and A Levels than it is linear. If you didn't find it any harder that's good for you, but I'm not talking specifically about you. They require different revision techniques and exam techniques, which is what OP is offering advice for, so it's important that OP specifies.
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vicvic38
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(Original post by ProbablyPallas)
So did I, and statistically it is easier to get higher grades doing modular GCSEs and A Levels than it is linear. If you didn't find it any harder that's good for you, but I'm not talking specifically about you. They require different revision techniques and exam techniques, which is what OP is offering advice for, so it's important that OP specifies.
The revision techniques are honestly not that different. It's just more content required at once, so you have to work smart, not hard.

Even then. A Levels can be revised for by just bashing out past papers for 3 months. You don't need to do real revision.
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ProbablyPallas
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(Original post by vicvic38)
The revision techniques are honestly not that different. It's just more content required at once, so you have to work smart, not hard.

Even then. A Levels can be revised for by just bashing out past papers for 3 months. You don't need to do real revision.
I'm not sure why you're trying to argue with me? If the techniques weren't that different FOR YOU that's great, all I'm saying is that OP should specify.
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rsidofdhoidsh
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(Original post by HumblyBumbly)
Ask me any questions you like with regards to grades, studying, University. I am really quite bored of my studies at the moment and need a small break. I feel I might be able to help some people so ask away
Do you think that doing the 5 a levels was worth it or would you have preferred to do 3 or 4?
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Muttley79
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(Original post by HumblyBumbly)
Yes modular. Perhaps, though you do sit fewer papers and if like my school you sat all the modular papers at the end of the year, first of AS and then A2 you could argue it is harder. That meant in my A2 year I sat: 2 history papers, 3 maths papers, 2 biology papers and 2 chemistry papers in the space of less than a month.

I don't agree the exam technique differs but yes arguably you have more content to learn. Having said that though if it is objectively more difficult this is usually reflected in lower grade boundaries. So whilst you might want to dismiss my grades as lucky or a product of the exam system, I am not sure the logic holds strongly.
Sorry, they are very different - having AS meant not everything was reliant on Year 13. FAR less content too and you knew exactly what to revise for each Maths paper. As a teacher I can assure you that the two systems are VERY different.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by rsidofdhoidsh)
Do you think that doing the 5 a levels was worth it or would you have preferred to do 3 or 4?
The OP did 4 A levels and an EPQ - misleading title.
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rsidofdhoidsh
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(Original post by Muttley79)
The OP did 4 A levels and an EPQ - misleading title.
oh, whats an EPQ lol?
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Muttley79
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(Original post by rsidofdhoidsh)
oh, whats an EPQ lol?
https://www.ucas.com/connect/blogs/w...e-epq-advice-1
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by vicvic38)
Even then. A Levels can be revised for by just bashing out past papers for 3 months. You don't need to do real revision.
Maybe for the sciences but not for humanities. My year was also the first year to do the linear A-levels so there were no past papers only about two specimen ones.
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HumblyBumbly
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(Original post by Muttley79)
The OP did 4 A levels and an EPQ - misleading title.
God you seem very bitter for some reason. I have stated multiple times that I did an EPQ and that it should have been a small case A* but I don't see how it is misleading to quote my grades.

(Original post by Muttley79)
Sorry, they are very different - having AS meant not everything was reliant on Year 13. FAR less content too and you knew exactly what to revise for each Maths paper. As a teacher I can assure you that the two systems are VERY different.
as for this - I have tutored students the new syllabus and fair enough if your experience is, that they are harder, but content wise it is exactly the same, if like my school you sat all your papers in the summer.

But either way even if it were the case that it was marginally more difficult you make two assumptions: a) that my grades would have been different and b) that I therefore didn't deserve to get my grades because I was at an unfair advantage. Both are plausible but by no means certain. Especially since for Biology I overall dropped 4 UMS across my 4 papers (90/90, 148/150, 88/90, 150/150). Chemistry and Maths were similar. Indeed, I even know students who do coursework for their A-level sciences. But I don't see why it is an argument really. I was only offering people advice if they wanted it. You seem to want to spend your time criticising others. I have no idea why you'd want to do that.
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by Muttley79)
Sorry, they are very different - having AS meant not everything was reliant on Year 13. FAR less content too and you knew exactly what to revise for each Maths paper. As a teacher I can assure you that the two systems are VERY different.
Agreed, plus when it was modular you had the benefit of resits which have been done away with.
It's also pretty demoralising when you have worked hard all year 12 only for it to all be for nothing and having to 'start again' as such in year 13.
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HumblyBumbly
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
Maybe for the sciences but not for humanities. My year was also the first year to do the linear A-levels so there were no past papers only about two specimen ones.
content is very similar though. It definitely is a different challenge, but I don't know if it actually does make it drastically harder since the percentage of As to A* hasn't changed at all dramatically

(Original post by CoolCavy)
Agreed, plus when it was modular you had the benefit of resits which have been done away with.
It's also pretty demoralising when you have worked hard all year 12 only for it to all be for nothing and having to 'start again' as such in year 13.

this I agree with though (I didn't resit any exams)
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by HumblyBumbly)
content is very similar though. It definitely is a different challenge, but I don't know if it actually does make it drastically harder since the percentage of As to A* hasn't changed at all dramatically
Yes true, it's just more content which did feel rather unfair at the time, for instance the year above us in history only had to remember half the time period we did at the end of year 13. However someone has to be the first year and it just happened to be us that time.
Congratulations for your grades my measly 1 A* and 2 As don't look amazing in comparison
I was flirting with the idea of doing an EPQ but decided against it as I needed to work on a portfolio for my uni interview. For medicine and sciences things like EPQs seem to give you an edge if you do well in it.
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vicvic38
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
Maybe for the sciences but not for humanities. My year was also the first year to do the linear A-levels so there were no past papers only about two specimen ones.
Yeah I did linear English? It wasn't hard to revise for.
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TakeALittleWalk
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I’ve got GCSEs in about 90 days and am expected 8s/9s due to miraculous performances from late night revision in mock exams. It won’t happen again. Basically how did you perform in your GCSEs and when did you start revising?
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HumblyBumbly
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
Yes true, it's just more content which did feel rather unfair at the time, for instance the year above us in history only had to remember half the time period we did at the end of year 13. However someone has to be the first year and it just happened to be us that time.
Congratulations for your grades my measly 1 A* and 2 As don't look amazing in comparison
I was flirting with the idea of doing an EPQ but decided against it as I needed to work on a portfolio for my uni interview. For medicine and sciences things like EPQs seem to give you an edge if you do well in it.
I wouldn't call it measly at all - well done on your grades. At the end of the day it's all about what you put in and what you aim for. I really wanted to do as well as I could, because I went to quite a bad school and had had a rough time at home. I just wanted to prove everyone wrong and show I could do it and I could go to somewhere like Oxford. So I really pushed myself, but yeah not sure why some people seem to want to put it that the only reason another succeeds is because of this extraneous factor rather than think about the effort and sacrifice the person puts in. Doesn't make sense.

I just saw EPQ as an opportunity to read about something I didn't know that much about and wanted to learn more about - I really enjoyed it 😅
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Emman.78
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Congratulations on the phenomenal results. I’m in year 12 and also would like to study medicine. I have the following questions:
What university do you go to now?
Do you have any tips for maths, biology and chemistry?
I’m don’t like memorising much so I tend to just do notes for chemistry and biology, and watch videos and do practice questions? I plan on making really brief flashcards based on the types of questions I find during practice. Do you think that would be ok?

I’m also not very naturally inclined towards maths so tips for that would be greatly appreciated.

What did you do your EPQ on and when did you start writing it? I don’t think my school offers it and I’m worried that will set me back.

How did you prepare for the bmat/ukcat and when did you start revising for them?

Thanks
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Muttley79
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(Original post by HumblyBumbly)
God you seem very bitter for some reason. I have stated multiple times that I did an EPQ and that it should have been a small case A* but I don't see how it is misleading to quote my grades.


as for this - I have tutored students the new syllabus and fair enough if your experience is, that they are harder, but content wise it is exactly the same, if like my school you sat all your papers in the summer.

But either way even if it were the case that it was marginally more difficult you make two assumptions: a) that my grades would have been different and b) that I therefore didn't deserve to get my grades because I was at an unfair advantage. Both are plausible but by no means certain. Especially since for Biology I overall dropped 4 UMS across my 4 papers (90/90, 148/150, 88/90, 150/150). Chemistry and Maths were similar. Indeed, I even know students who do coursework for their A-level sciences. But I don't see why it is an argument really. I was only offering people advice if they wanted it. You seem to want to spend your time criticising others. I have no idea why you'd want to do that.
You are giving advice on revising on an exam system you've never experienced. I am commenting that your advice may not be a helpful as you think; if you interpret that as criticism then that's your choice.

UMS did not equal raw marks either so even full UMS did not equate to full marks.
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motivatedmadman
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What made you choose medicine compared to other subjects (e.g biomed, natsci etc)?
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HumblyBumbly
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(Original post by Muttley79)
You are giving advice on revising on an exam system you've never experienced. I am commenting that your advice may not be a helpful as you think; if you interpret that as criticism then that's your choice.

UMS did not equal raw marks either so even full UMS did not equate to full marks.
🤦🏻*♂️Okay. Now everyone has seen your comments and they can deem my advice either useless (as you'd advise them to) OR they may want to try it out. I will leave it to others to decide which they would like to do. Given most of it is simply about revision techniques and motivation to study - I would imagine it is applicable pretty much in any context given I use it even at medical school. But ... perhaps you think the new A-levels are SO unique that NOTHING, no other exam system is at all similar. There has apparently been a revolution in education supposedly. If so, then people can choose (if they so wish) to use my advice when they return from the Bolshevik exams and enter University life.

As for the second part - this is true, but is not only applicable in the past tense - it also applies now. Again - that is a fault of the exam boards, not my own. I am given UMS marks rather than raw marks. So that was a rather pointless statement. Regardless have a nice evening ...

(Original post by motivatedmadman)
What made you choose medicine compared to other subjects (e.g biomed, natsci etc)?
To be honest, I find this easier to answer retrospectively. If you were to ask me now: I would say Medicine is fantastic for the opportunity to work in a team for what feels like a very noble cause - that is the care of your patients. It also offers the opportunity to have a very technical set of skills (esp. with surgery) and also a knowledge base that is useful to patients. I find it intellectually stimulating at this point in time.

Something like NatSci a lot of the above are equally true e.g. working in a lab involves much of the above, I think the difference for me now, having worked in a lab versus a hospital is that in science you often are working on very esoteric problems and are hyper-specialised. I am not sure that was for me. I think I like the fact Medicine is both an art and a science, and offers a diversity of things on a daily basis - especially at this stage.
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