Only owning British Passport and Brexit. Watch

barnetlad
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#21
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#21
When the result of the referendum was 52% for leaving the EU, I did research eligibility for passports of the two EU member states I have family living in or born in. Sadly not eligible for either one.
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ColinDent
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#22
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#22
(Original post by barnetlad)
When the result of the referendum was 52% for leaving the EU, I did research eligibility for passports of the two EU member states I have family living in or born in. Sadly not eligible for either one.
Aww, did you discover that Wales doesn't count as an EU member state?
If you wish to travel for holiday or work reasons you will be able to, you may have to spend a few minutes of your time filling in a simple online form for work purposes but is that really a major inconvenience?
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Lucifer323
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#23
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#23
Colin Dent,

If that the only inconvenience there would have been no problem.

The idiocy of the Brexit side is something else.

Mr Burton was talking about Neoliberal EU Countries and policies without realizing the most Neoliberal is the UK with a Banch of Charlatans, Clowns, and Populists as their leaders. Together with a stupid electorate they make an explosive mixture.
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ColinDent
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#24
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#24
(Original post by Lucifer323)
Colin Dent,

If that the only inconvenience there would have been no problem.

The idiocy of the Brexit side is something else.

Mr Burton was talking about Neoliberal EU Countries and policies without realizing the most Neoliberal is the UK with a Banch of Charlatans, Clowns, and Populists as their leaders. Together with a stupid electorate they make an explosive mixture.
Do you not get bored of writing the same tired old **** over and over again?
It doesn't make your ramblings any more valid, in fact with your incessant banging on about your threads with over 100 comments it merely makes you look like the desperate troll that you are.
Are you related to Queenie by any chance?
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Dee-Emma
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#25
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#25
Really sad to have my EU passport replaced by just a UK one. Practically it will make some difference, especially for longer stays in EU states, but mainly emotionally - my passport said the whole of the EU was 'my place'. That mattered to me, and it's been taken without my consent.
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fallen_acorns
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#26
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#26
I feel great. Why not? I travel around quite a bit outside of the EU, with my wife who doesn't have a british passport.. and its lovely never having to worry about Visas, and being able to go to most places for 30 days without doing anything. (Uposed to my wife who needs a visa for pratically everywhere)

As for in the EU, it won't change much. British people aren't going to have to start applying for Shengen visas or the like.. at most there will likely be a little E-visa type thing that needs to be filled out before you go. No big deal.

The UK passport is still a great asset internationally.
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History98
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#27
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I don't think that Brits who travel for only short periods will be severely affected by the travel restrictions that will come about because of Brexit. The people who will be affected the most will be people who wish to make long term moves to the EU (this includes both UK workers and people moving for family reasons). Skilled and unskilled workers alike will find it difficult to move to the continent, moving there on a work visa is very difficult for most.

The same difficulties will apply for EU citizens who wish to work or live with their families in the UK. Even if they have the required skills, paying the required UK visa fees and surcharges will probably prove burdensome for most. At the current going rate, a family of four immigrating to the UK on the main work route (the Tier 2) needs to pay at least £27000 in total before the whole family acquires British citizenship (This figure is due to rise to £31.5K when the IHS goes up to £625 per year - no date set yet for this to happen).The employer will also need to pay the migrant charge of £5000 and other visa related costs. This assumes the family pays for no premium services. On top of this if EU migrants are merged into the non-EU work route they will naturally not be eligible for access to benefits (such as child benefits and childcare) in the first 5 years. Around half of the skilled workers will also probably not be eligible to claim any state pension even if they have several years worth of NI contributions under their belt because of various provisos.
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L i b
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#28
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#28
I'm not all that fussed, as it goes. I think it would be absurd for there to be no visa-free travel to the EU, given that we have visa-free travel to something like 180-odd countries. Those where I've had to get a visa have had a straightforward process - I've usually seen it as little more than a way to get a few US dollars off the tourists.

In terms of working abroad, I don't really see it as a significant thing. Given that most people moving around the EU are middle class professionals who could probably just as easily get a work visa - just as they could if they moved to Canada or something - it doesn't really figure.

I suppose there are people who may cover a large multi-national region and work out of different offices in different places - and would find it more impractical to be constantly concerned about visa arrangements. But that's about the only problem I can seriously foresee.
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Sammylou40
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#29
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#29
(Original post by History98)
I don't think that Brits who travel for only short periods will be severely affected by the travel restrictions that will come about because of Brexit. The people who will be affected the most will be people who wish to make long term moves to the EU (this includes both UK workers and people moving for family reasons). Skilled and unskilled workers alike will find it difficult to move to the continent, moving there on a work visa is very difficult for most.

The same difficulties will apply for EU citizens who wish to work or live with their families in the UK. Even if they have the required skills, paying the required UK visa fees and surcharges will probably prove burdensome for most. At the current going rate, a family of four immigrating to the UK on the main work route (the Tier 2) needs to pay at least £27000 in total before the whole family acquires British citizenship (This figure is due to rise to £31.5K when the IHS goes up to £625 per year - no date set yet for this to happen).The employer will also need to pay the migrant charge of £5000 and other visa related costs. This assumes the family pays for no premium services. On top of this if EU migrants are merged into the non-EU work route they will naturally not be eligible for access to benefits (such as child benefits and childcare) in the first 5 years. Around half of the skilled workers will also probably not be eligible to claim any state pension even if they have several years worth of NI contributions under their belt because of various provisos.
Sounds fair enough to me
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