Stammering at sixth form Watch

Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#1
Stammering, particularity year 13, is definitely affecting my mental well-being dramatically. For example, basically never talking in class, never going to any social events, and wanting to miss an increasing number of school days etc.. I have also made minimum friends since starting sixth form. I feel I can achieve good grades but my stammer has brought on secondary side effects like laziness and anxiety. This has made me do minimum work. My a levels are in around three of months and just wondering if anyone (particularly who has a stammer) has any advice/ motivation. Thanks in advance...
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Analyst89
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#2
Report 2 weeks ago
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I used to have a stammering problem I recommend seeing a speech therapist.
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Anonymous #2
#3
Report 1 week ago
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Hi,

I stammer and I understand what you mean. At my undergrad, I was relatively quiet in seminars/lectures. I'm on my MSc now and it got really bad as my seminars are very interactive in terms of speaking to the whole group and frequently giving presentations. I hated the ice breaker 'Let's go around the room and introduce ourselves'.

Most stammering people call this "creeping death" as the spotlight systematical goes around the room until it's on you and speaking becomes nearly an impossible task. As a result, I became very stressed in my first term and wanted to withdraw from my MSc. I began seeing a Cognitive Behavioural Therapist at the university.

I told him how I felt and *admitted* to him that I have a stammer. Which strangely enough felt great because I'd never once opened up or admitted I have one in my childhood so it felt that I was hiding something that would always reveal itself. After addressing the 'elephant' in the room I began stammering a lot less during our sessions.

He told me admitting I have a stammer relieved me of the pressures of hiding it, therefore, I was under less stress. Ever since then, if I have a job interview or a presentation I always begin by admitting I have a stammer "Hi, my names ***** and I have a stammer so I may pause mid-sentence, but its because I am taking my time to talk". I have been doing this for the last 3-4 months and I am in a much better place mentally and I stammer less!

I would recommend seeking similar help as it helped me a lot!
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Anonymous #1
#4
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hi,

I stammer and I understand what you mean. At my undergrad, I was relatively quiet in seminars/lectures. I'm on my MSc now and it got really bad as my seminars are very interactive in terms of speaking to the whole group and frequently giving presentations. I hated the ice breaker 'Let's go around the room and introduce ourselves'.

Most stammering people call this "creeping death" as the spotlight systematical goes around the room until it's on you and speaking becomes nearly an impossible task. As a result, I became very stressed in my first term and wanted to withdraw from my MSc. I began seeing a Cognitive Behavioural Therapist at the university.

I told him how I felt and *admitted* to him that I have a stammer. Which strangely enough felt great because I'd never once opened up or admitted I have one in my childhood so it felt that I was hiding something that would always reveal itself. After addressing the 'elephant' in the room I began stammering a lot less during our sessions.

He told me admitting I have a stammer relieved me of the pressures of hiding it, therefore, I was under less stress. Ever since then, if I have a job interview or a presentation I always begin by admitting I have a stammer "Hi, my names ***** and I have a stammer so I may pause mid-sentence, but its because I am taking my time to talk". I have been doing this for the last 3-4 months and I am in a much better place mentally and I stammer less!

I would recommend seeking similar help as it helped me a lot
I am seeing a speech therapist currently but isn't particularly helping. Have you gone to a speech therapist and if so did it help, or do you think that CBT is better? Isn't CBT more psychological than physical help? I think my stammer is more mental than physical. I am also thinking of going uni next year but know I will have to do a fair bit of talking on my BEng course, so debating whether uni and that course are right for me, as I could have chosen something like physics where I believe less talking is involved. Would you recommend taking a gap year or going to uni? Also, have you found it hard to make friends at uni, cos that is something I am also worried about?
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Anonymous #2
#5
Report 1 week ago
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I am seeing a speech therapist currently but isn't particularly helping. Have you gone to a speech therapist and if so did it help, or do you think that CBT is better? Isn't CBT more psychological than physical help? I think my stammer is more mental than physical. I am also thinking of going uni next year but know I will have to do a fair bit of talking on my BEng course, so debating whether uni and that course are right for me, as I could have chosen something like physics where I believe less talking is involved. Would you recommend taking a gap year or going to uni? Also, have you found it hard to make friends at uni, cos that is something I am also worried about?
I wanted to see a speech therapist but my university didn't offer that service so I got whatever help I could get my hands on (CBT). In my experience, a stammer can be both mental and physical, for me its more mental than physical. When I'm alone, my stammer disappears, its when I know I'm talking to someone it remerges.

I 100% recommend going university and NOT letting your stammer dictate your life choices as it does not define you. I did struggle to make friends in my younger years because of my stammer but I found confidence in playing rugby, which had a huge positive impact on me. I recommend joining a society and making friends. For me, joining the rugby society was the best thing I did at my undergraduate for many reasons. One of the biggest challenges came in my third year where I was voted to be club president. This was especially daunting for me as I had to give monthly presentations to a panel of Students Union representatives about our goals, events, fundraisers etc... and relay this back to the whole society (73 members). I found regularly giving presentations and talking to the whole society helped me in the long run. 2 months in and my speech almost became smooth as I stopped getting nervous and anxious.

If there is anything you can take away from my experinces. Its to put yourself in public speaking situations. You'd be surprised how well you can overcome your stammer.
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