Boltyyyy
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My physics teacher was telling me that the best way to revise is through 20 minute bursts with a 5/10 min break in between, as the brain focuses more in short bursts or sumin like that

Can anyone tell me if this is true or is he just a waffler
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PurpleGhost
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This is true for some people yeah! This is how I tried to learn Japanese scripts (the symbols they use instead of letters). I think this method is good at trying to commit certain things to memory. Though I don’t know if it’s the best way to revise for everything like obviously some knowledge isn’t as easy to sink in, so you might have to spend longer on it. Having breaks does help though because it makes you not think about it for a bit and then when you go back to it you can see if you’ve actually remembered it or not. If not you know where the work needs to be.
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brainzistheword
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(Original post by Boltyyyy)
My physics teacher was telling me that the best way to revise is through 20 minute bursts with a 5/10 min break in between, as the brain focuses more in short bursts or sumin like that

Can anyone tell me if this is true or is he just a waffler
It's sometimes referred to as the Pomodoro Technique, but there are now quite a few variations. One of the main reasons behind it is that there's evidence to suggest we only focus for the first 20 minutes or so, therefore the idea is that we maximise this time and then take a break.

I wouldn't say it's a universal 'works for everyone' technique but it could be worth giving it a go and trying different duration bursts. Sometimes, a longer session might be needed if the topic is quite complicated, as I'd struggle to get more technical topics covered in 20 minutes!

So, your teacher isn't waffling, but it's worth experimenting with the technique to see what suits you
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Boltyyyy
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(Original post by brainzistheword)
It's sometimes referred to as the Pomodoro Technique, but there are now quite a few variations. One of the main reasons behind it is that there's evidence to suggest we only focus for the first 20 minutes or so, therefore the idea is that we maximise this time and then take a break.

I wouldn't say it's a universal 'works for everyone' technique but it could be worth giving it a go and trying different duration bursts. Sometimes, a longer session might be needed if the topic is quite complicated, as I'd struggle to get more technical topics covered in 20 minutes!

So, your teacher isn't waffling, but it's worth experimenting with the technique to see what suits you
Wow thank you
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