Milena1234
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I have applied for teacher training. Completed all my application with UCAS. All my placements were provided by Exeter University. And i did went trough hell with their admissions department. From Bulgaria i have top grade masters degree in IT. Exeter University told me that i need to provide them with math syllabus at my secondary education. Despite i have payed and provided them with NARIC sertificate where clearly stated that i have math equivalent of GSCE.

I was on 2 school interviews, children love me and assessing teachers where not that impress.

I do know i live in a least diverce part of UK - south west, but please.

After applying to SCITT for my second choice, i was refused again and the reason been that I have not done experience in state funded school.

All my experience is from private school where i have been volenteering in the last 5 years.

And on the same interview they mencioned that i can do equivelency tests instead of GSCE, and after on the rejection email they said that GSCE is essential, not even a chance if i really go and passGSCE.

Can someone explain to me how to overcome prejustice and small minded people.

And how to go about it.

Thanks for everyone who reads this tread.
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Get into Teaching
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(Original post by Milena1234)
I have applied for teacher training. Completed all my application with UCAS. All my placements were provided by Exeter University. And i did went trough hell with their admissions department. From Bulgaria i have top grade masters degree in IT. Exeter University told me that i need to provide them with math syllabus at my secondary education. Despite i have payed and provided them with NARIC sertificate where clearly stated that i have math equivalent of GSCE.

I was on 2 school interviews, children love me and assessing teachers where not that impress.

I do know i live in a least diverce part of UK - south west, but please.

After applying to SCITT for my second choice, i was refused again and the reason been that I have not done experience in state funded school.

All my experience is from private school where i have been volenteering in the last 5 years.

And on the same interview they mencioned that i can do equivelency tests instead of GSCE, and after on the rejection email they said that GSCE is essential, not even a chance if i really go and passGSCE.

Can someone explain to me how to overcome prejustice and small minded people.

And how to go about it.

Thanks for everyone who reads this tread.
Hello

The entry requirements for any teacher training course are specified by the government, and says you must have a GCSE in Maths and English (for secondary) or English, Maths and Science (for Primary) or an equivalent qualification in those subjects. The 'equivalent' qualifications are difficult to consider as there are many, and so the providers are at liability to say which they will accept or not. This includes their ability to offer an equivalence test. Each differ in what they consider an equivalent and so it can be a difficult challenge to overcome for all parties involved.

I would strongly encourage you to contact the Get into Teaching support service and ask for a Teacher Training Adviser, someone who can help you prepare for the interviews that you may have upcoming. We can also assist you by arranging school experience in a state-maintained setting. Please call 0800 389 2500 or register your interest here. The support is free of any cost and we are very experienced in supporting people in similar circumstances to you in the South West.

Wishing you all the very best for a more positive experience and outcome,

Jane
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by Milena1234)
I have applied for teacher training. Completed all my application with UCAS. All my placements were provided by Exeter University. And i did went trough hell with their admissions department. From Bulgaria i have top grade masters degree in IT. Exeter University told me that i need to provide them with math syllabus at my secondary education. Despite i have payed and provided them with NARIC sertificate where clearly stated that i have math equivalent of GSCE.

I was on 2 school interviews, children love me and assessing teachers where not that impress.

I do know i live in a least diverce part of UK - south west, but please.

After applying to SCITT for my second choice, i was refused again and the reason been that I have not done experience in state funded school.

All my experience is from private school where i have been volenteering in the last 5 years.

And on the same interview they mencioned that i can do equivelency tests instead of GSCE, and after on the rejection email they said that GSCE is essential, not even a chance if i really go and passGSCE.

Can someone explain to me how to overcome prejustice and small minded people.

And how to go about it.

Thanks for everyone who reads this tread.
Hi

As has been said, the providers don't have much choice over the English/maths requirements for their courses. These requirements are set by the DfE who set minimum standards for all teachers. Whilst unis are allowed to accept equivalents, they have to be sure you have the level of maths required to cope with the course.

ITT providers are also allowed to set requirements around volunteering in UK state schools- state schools are very different environments to private schools and they need to know you will cope in that environment.

It's honestly not about prejudice- it's about knowing that the PGCE/SCITT is tough enough without accepting people who don't have the right experience/qualifications. If you really want to train to teach in the UK, I'd honestly suggest sitting a UK based GCSE (you can book to sit one in the summer still if you are quick and it's not that expensive) and getting some state school experience!
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Milena1234
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(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
Hi

As has been said, the providers don't have much choice over the English/maths requirements for their courses. These requirements are set by the DfE who set minimum standards for all teachers. Whilst unis are allowed to accept equivalents, they have to be sure you have the level of maths required to cope with the course.

ITT providers are also allowed to set requirements around volunteering in UK state schools- state schools are very different environments to private schools and they need to know you will cope in that environment.

It's honestly not about prejudice- it's about knowing that the PGCE/SCITT is tough enough without accepting people who don't have the right experience/qualifications. If you really want to train to teach in the UK, I'd honestly suggest sitting a UK based GCSE (you can book to sit one in the summer still if you are quick and it's not that expensive) and getting some state school experience!
It is prejudice, because SCITT told me that i can have equivalent english test and their refusal was that i have only experience in private sector. And to be honest if i dont think i could pass the course and after that teaching i would not had applied. But thanks for the answer.
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Milena1234
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had Get into teaching adviser and she was puzzeled as why they make it so difficult. But obviously the country dont need teachers. Thanks for the reply, much appreciated.
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by Milena1234)
It is prejudice, because SCITT told me that i can have equivalent english test and their refusal was that i have only experience in private sector. And to be honest if i dont think i could pass the course and after that teaching i would not had applied. But thanks for the answer.
I will tell you honestly that I had no idea how hard the PGCE would be when I applied. I had read all the scare stories online and I still went in unprepared. ITT providers have a much more realistic idea about what's needed to succeed on the course.

State and private sector schools are so different, experience in the private sector won't fully prepare you for what state schools are like.

I'm also getting a bit confused, as originally you said it was maths that was the issue with Exeter, but now you mention English?

Like I say, I'm sorry you've been disappointed, but if you want to do a PGCE in the UK, this is a relatively easy fix.
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