UK place names etymology

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Ferrograd
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Interesting place names. In East Anglia and even in the west of England there are a lot of Germanic names, eg Cotswolds, Southwold, South Weald, East Bergholt Also in Essex we have a lot of French names. Theydon Bois (never sure how to pronounce it), Thorpe Le- Soken, Tolleshunt D'Arcy,, Layer De La Haye. Any other examples you can think of in your area? Anyone know what the etymology of ford is? I thought it might be from the Dutch voord? Wich? York is also from Jorvik.
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Rennaofravenwood
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I find this kind of thing fascinating. A lot of suffixes and prefixes come from viking settlers and incorporate Norse, for example "Selby", and "Whitby". "By" is the Norse word for town or city. Another example is my city Ely in Cambridgeshire. It comes from "Eel-Oy" Or Eel Island in Norse. I think ford comes from fording a river, so anywhere with that in the title would have been built around a crossing place.
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the bear
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you might enjoy today's game:

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6351466
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NJA
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The Cymri called high places of worship Gorsedds, i.e. "High Seats", where the king of chieftain, the clergy and freemen assembled to enact law and justice, their Parliament. Parliament Hill in London was called Llan-din (sacred eminence) in Welsh, where London gets it's name. The Tower of London was erected on Bryn Gwyn, i.e. hill white, or as we say, White Hill. Westminster Abbey to the west had another circle and a Druid College named Tothill (the hill has been levelled, Tothill Street remains). The site of St Paul's was another one and finally, he Windsor Gorsedd, or Win-de-Sieur - Whie/holy mount of the Sieur/Lord remains the seat of the Monarch.

Druid seats of learning were effectively universities/colleges that attracted people from across Europe. Examples are Caer Leil (Carlisle), Caer Brit (Bristol), Caer Werllan (Verulam, i.e. St Albans), Caer Badden (Bath) and CaerLlyr (Leicester).
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