Kaiser Wilhelm
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Probably a really dumb question but whatever.

Will aeronautical engineers (planes in earth's atmosphere) still be needed in the future (10+)? This is because planes are already advanced and very efficient etc (especially commercial planes).

Any advice is greatly appreciated .
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University of Bath
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Hi there - I would definitely say yes!

Technology is ever developing to try and make aircraft more afforadable, more sustainable and perform better. There is a huge demand for aeronautical engineers worldwide and the aerospace industry in the UK is huge

University research is often at the heart of all of these big changes. With the climate crisis happening now and the use of planes increasing, high quality engineers are required to develop the technology to limit the impact on the environment.

The University of Bath offers MEng Aerospace Engineering. The course is always being developed to include more innovative methods to train engineers to be equipped for the changing industry. Bath's excellent placement scheme is very well supported and would allow to apply to work in many big aerospace companies.

Do let me know if you have any questions

Leah
3rd Year Chemical Engineering
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Kaiser Wilhelm
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(Original post by University of Bath)
Hi there - I would definitely say yes!

Technology is ever developing to try and make aircraft more afforadable, more sustainable and perform better. There is a huge demand for aeronautical engineers worldwide and the aerospace industry in the UK is huge

University research is often at the heart of all of these big changes. With the climate crisis happening now and the use of planes increasing, high quality engineers are required to develop the technology to limit the impact on the environment.

The University of Bath offers MEng Aerospace Engineering. The course is always being developed to include more innovative methods to train engineers to be equipped for the changing industry. Bath's excellent placement scheme is very well supported and would allow to apply to work in many big aerospace companies.

Do let me know if you have any questions

Leah
3rd Year Chemical Engineering
Thanks for your reply. Since you said, I have some questions:

Question 1: Would a PhD in a speciality in aerospace get me a higher pay and/or enable me to get higher rank jobs in a big aerospace company?
Question 2: What are the big aerospace companies in the uk? (i know there is Airbus, Rolls Royce and BAE systems, but are there any more?).

Thanks .
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mnot
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(Original post by Kaiser Wilhelm)
Thanks for your reply. Since you said, I have some questions:

Question 1: Would a PhD in a speciality in aerospace get me a higher pay and/or enable me to get higher rank jobs in a big aerospace company?
Question 2: What are the big aerospace companies in the uk? (i know there is Airbus, Rolls Royce and BAE systems, but are there any more?).

Thanks .
original post, yes.

q1) maybe, depends what your PhD is in and how you leverage it. A PhD is not worth it unless you truly love the subject matter, your going to spend 4 years managing a large project single handidly and it will rely on you caring immensely.

q2) Rolls-Royce, Airbus, BAE systems are by far the biggest but...
GKN, GE, Bombardier, Leonardo, MBDA
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Kaiser Wilhelm
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(Original post by mnot)
original post, yes.

q1) maybe, depends what your PhD is in and how you leverage it. A PhD is not worth it unless you truly love the subject matter, your going to spend 4 years managing a large project single handidly and it will rely on you caring immensely.

q2) Rolls-Royce, Airbus, BAE systems are by far the biggest but...
GKN, GE, Bombardier, Leonardo, MBDA
I'm not sure what PhD because I haven't researched it yet. I do love the subject since I love maths, physics and airplanes in general (especially commercial planes).
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Smack
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(Original post by Kaiser Wilhelm)
I'm not sure what PhD because I haven't researched it yet. I do love the subject since I love maths, physics and airplanes in general (especially commercial planes).
You don't need to be worrying about PhD topics yet, as presumably you're not at university yet. Generally, if you want a career in industry, you're better off building up your experience in said industry rather than doing a PhD; however, PhDs are required for academic careers, and also for some very technical positions in industry (again, depending on the topic of your PhD).
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mnot
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(Original post by Kaiser Wilhelm)
I'm not sure what PhD because I haven't researched it yet. I do love the subject since I love maths, physics and airplanes in general (especially commercial planes).
Where are you educationally, because you most likely have plenty of time to find your area if you wanted to go down the research route.

I know you say planes are already efficient but on this point, are you talking about combustion? because we are going to see a huge push towards decarbonisation this will lean more on electrification, alternative fuels, new combustion strategies so there is plenty just on propulsion to work on.

Additionally, reducing drag, load capacity etc. will all contribute to propulsion so still stuff for aero, structural, materials and manufacturing areas of aero industry.

Also thing like reducing aircraft noise will be big, increasing aircraft speed and stability without compromising dynamics.

Im also sure areas such as reducing aircraft production & operating costs, will always exist. Aero industry will need new aircraft of different sizes, this will all come with new engineering challenges.

But Ive heard rumours there is an emerging market for:
-super-sonic private business travel
-short distance net zero travel
Neither of these aircraft exist today, someone will have to engineer these.

Also ive not even touched on: aircraft avionics, interiors, packaging, military. Point is there is plenty to do for those who want to work in aerospace in the future.
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Kaiser Wilhelm
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(Original post by mnot)
Where are you educationally, because you most likely have plenty of time to find your area if you wanted to go down the research route.

I know you say planes are already efficient but on this point, are you talking about combustion? because we are going to see a huge push towards decarbonisation this will lean more on electrification, alternative fuels, new combustion strategies so there is plenty just on propulsion to work on.

Additionally, reducing drag, load capacity etc. will all contribute to propulsion so still stuff for aero, structural, materials and manufacturing areas of aero industry.

Also thing like reducing aircraft noise will be big, increasing aircraft speed and stability without compromising dynamics.

Im also sure areas such as reducing aircraft production & operating costs, will always exist. Aero industry will need new aircraft of different sizes, this will all come with new engineering challenges.

But Ive heard rumours there is an emerging market for:
-super-sonic private business travel
-short distance net zero travel
Neither of these aircraft exist today, someone will have to engineer these.

Also ive not even touched on: aircraft avionics, interiors, packaging, military. Point is there is plenty to do for those who want to work in aerospace in the future.
Thanks for clearing it up for me. I was worried that the aeronautical industry wouldn't have much to advance from at this point, especially after I finish A levels, do a masters degree and maybe a PhD.
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Kaiser Wilhelm
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(Original post by Smack)
You don't need to be worrying about PhD topics yet, as presumably you're not at university yet. Generally, if you want a career in industry, you're better off building up your experience in said industry rather than doing a PhD; however, PhDs are required for academic careers, and also for some very technical positions in industry (again, depending on the topic of your PhD).
I was just thinking about getting a PhD if I wanted to specialise more. I have no idea if experience is better than a PhD or not :confused:.
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mnot
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(Original post by Kaiser Wilhelm)
I was just thinking about getting a PhD if I wanted to specialise more. I have no idea if experience is better than a PhD or not :confused:.
still years away its something once your in 3rd/4th year of undergrad/masters you can start to think about. Just focus on doing well academically for now.
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Kaiser Wilhelm
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(Original post by mnot)
still years away its something once your in 3rd/4th year of undergrad/masters you can start to think about. Just focus on doing well academically for now.
Ok, thanks for the advice .
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University of Bath
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(Original post by Kaiser Wilhelm)
Thanks for your reply. Since you said, I have some questions:

Question 1: Would a PhD in a speciality in aerospace get me a higher pay and/or enable me to get higher rank jobs in a big aerospace company?
Question 2: What are the big aerospace companies in the uk? (i know there is Airbus, Rolls Royce and BAE systems, but are there any more?).

Thanks .
Hi there - apologies for the slow reply. I will try my best to answer your questions!

Question 1: Would a PhD in a speciality in aerospace get me a higher pay and/or enable me to get higher rank jobs in a big aerospace company?
As someone else said, this really depends. A PhD is normally on a very specific area that is quite new and requires lots of development. A PhD can be advantageous in industry but it really depends on what your research is in and where you want to go to in industry. As others have said, you really do not need to worry about knowing whether you want to do a PhD or not at the moment. The first 2 years of your degree will give you a great insight into existing and developing technologies, and if you choose to do a placement, this will show you what it is like to work in industry, where the industry is going and what kind of fields interest you most.

Question 2: What are the big aerospace companies in the uk? (i know there is Airbus, Rolls Royce and BAE systems, but are there any more?).
Aerospace is pretty big in the UK, and there is also a lot of aerospace in the South West, fairly close to Bath. This really helps with industrial links. Bath has excellent placement and graduate connections with industry - our graduates are highly regarded and there is a lot of development within these companies to help you develop and progress.

Bath students have previoously worked at Airbus, Boeing, Rolls Royce, Eaton, GE Aviation, GKN, UTC, Honeywell, Lenodardo, Magellan Aerospace, Ultra Eleectronic to name a few. There are plenty aerospace opportunities at both large and small companies - both which offer different but equally valuable experience.

Hope that was helpful - good luck with everything

Leah
3rd Year Chemical Engineering
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