GrammarGirl
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Hi there,

Could anyone shed some light on what the key differences are between a PhD studentship and a PhD? Are there any key positive / negatives of one over the other?

Thank you!
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Mr Wednesday
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(Original post by GrammarGirl)
Hi there,

Could anyone shed some light on what the key differences are between a PhD studentship and a PhD? Are there any key positive / negatives of one over the other?
A PhD studentship is the funding package (bursary, fees, possibly lab consumables and travel etc) that you typically get in a part or fully funded position. The money for that usually comes from a research grant, a research council, industry, charity or a project that that an academic has been awarded. Some universities will also have a limited number of scholarships available to individual applicants, those tend to be very competitive. The PhD on its own is the qualification you end up with ~4 years after you start if things go well.

Some universities might offer you a PhD position that’s unfunded, not a great deal as you will have to pay for everything yourself and there is usually no financial safety net. Some international students might get a funding package from their home government to cover this, but then have to find someone willing to sueprvise them, so there is still an academic hurdle to get over.
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GrammarGirl
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(Original post by Mr Wednesday)
A PhD studentship is the funding package (bursary, fees, possibly lab consumables and travel etc) that you typically get in a part or fully funded position. The money for that usually comes from a research grant, a research council, industry, charity or a project that that an academic has been awarded. Some universities will also have a limited number of scholarships available to individual applicants, those tend to be very competitive. The PhD on its own is the qualification you end up with ~4 years after you start if things go well.

Some universities might offer you a PhD position that’s unfunded, not a great deal as you will have to pay for everything yourself and there is usually no financial safety net. Some international students might get a funding package from their home government to cover this, but then have to find someone willing to sueprvise them, so there is still an academic hurdle to get over.
Thanks so much - that's really helpful!
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