Anxiety and depression Watch

Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#1
Hello,

I have recently got into University, in year 3 of a 4 year course. At the start of it, i was really enjoying the course. However, i didn't get the results that i wanted over Christmas. This has led to an inflammation of my anxiety.

I am only enjoying one out of three modules this semester within University. I feel like joining a course in the 3rd year has stopped me from learning the necessary skills to survive at university. I just feel very overwhelmed. I also have a suspicion that i may be depressed also, due to events before the start of university.

Can someone help me by recommending ways of dealing with anxiety? I have also been looking into a university schedule, using the morning and night of each day as a time slot. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thank-you.
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princetonalec
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Report 2 weeks ago
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I'd suggest getting in contact with some form of mental health team, this may be with the University or with your GP, and I suggest this for a very clear reason.
I have anxiety which mainly presents in two different ways: ADHD and OCD (note that OCD has not been formally diagnosed in my case, but thats because I don't want a diagnosis on my file). These are wildly different from say social anxiety, because I can speak perfectly in public. I also fear that nothing I do will ever be good enough, and I am obsessively scared of the roof of my University dorm caving in, my heart stopping randomly in my chest, developing skin cancer, developing brain cancer, developing diabetes, and so on.
These are three very different forms of anxiety, and they are literally scratching the surface. You'd most likely find formal help more useful than a one size fits all approach.
Obviously also please phone the appropriate helplines if you feel you are a danger to yourself or anyone else. It's a tough bullet to bite, but it's worth it.
In terms of general coping mechanisms when it comes to anxiety, there are a few. Things like taking deep breaths, listing 5 things you can see; 4 things you can feel; 3 things you can hear; 2 things you can smell/like the smell of and 1 positive thing you like about yourself can help. There are also worry journals, where you jot down your worries and at a specific point in time predecided sit and worry, but outside of this time you don't. Theres also an anxiety journal: like a worry journal but you write your anxiety and then and there write a solution.
There are tonnes of other resources online, but like I already said you should see about getting professional help before anything else.
Wishing you the best
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Anonymous #1
#3
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
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(Original post by princetonalec)
I'd suggest getting in contact with some form of mental health team, this may be with the University or with your GP, and I suggest this for a very clear reason.
I have anxiety which mainly presents in two different ways: ADHD and OCD (note that OCD has not been formally diagnosed in my case, but thats because I don't want a diagnosis on my file). These are wildly different from say social anxiety, because I can speak perfectly in public. I also fear that nothing I do will ever be good enough, and I am obsessively scared of the roof of my University dorm caving in, my heart stopping randomly in my chest, developing skin cancer, developing brain cancer, developing diabetes, and so on.
These are three very different forms of anxiety, and they are literally scratching the surface. You'd most likely find formal help more useful than a one size fits all approach.
Obviously also please phone the appropriate helplines if you feel you are a danger to yourself or anyone else. It's a tough bullet to bite, but it's worth it.
In terms of general coping mechanisms when it comes to anxiety, there are a few. Things like taking deep breaths, listing 5 things you can see; 4 things you can feel; 3 things you can hear; 2 things you can smell/like the smell of and 1 positive thing you like about yourself can help. There are also worry journals, where you jot down your worries and at a specific point in time predecided sit and worry, but outside of this time you don't. Theres also an anxiety journal: like a worry journal but you write your anxiety and then and there write a solution.
There are tonnes of other resources online, but like I already said you should see about getting professional help before anything else.
Wishing you the best
Hey,

Thank you for replying! I currently have over three months for my assessments which honestly makes me feel better about it, slightly. I have an appointment with a mental health nurse, which i am trying to re-book because of university commitments. My main worry right now is a research proposal that we have to conduct as one of our assignments. I am struggling with this, its pretty much the cause of my anxiety currently i think.

Thanks.
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