redscarlett
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My teacher hasn't taught me any new terminology extending from GCSE to the new A Level e.g. things like anaphora et cetera… this has worried me a lot.
For the new A-levels do I need to know all the fancy terms and be able to apply them, as the mark scheme doesn't specify…?
Thanks!
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Lemonsandlemons
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(Original post by redscarlett)
My teacher hasn't taught me any new terminology extending from GCSE to the new A Level e.g. things like anaphora et cetera… this has worried me a lot.
For the new A-levels do I need to know all the fancy terms and be able to apply them, as the mark scheme doesn't specify…?
Thanks!
A level is more about presenting arguments, and offering varying interpretations. rather than memorising fancier terms
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Lemonsandlemons
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(Original post by Lemonsandlemons)
A level is more about presenting arguments, and offering varying interpretations. rather than memorising fancier terms
But if you are worried that you dont have enough terminology at hand this website was soo useful to me:

https://literary-devices.com/
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redscarlett
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(Original post by Lemonsandlemons)
But if you are worried that you dont have enough terminology at hand this website was soo useful to me:

https://literary-devices.com/
thanks so much!
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giella
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Markers do not like terminology for the sake of terminology. The worst examples I often see at GCSE come in the form of students trying to label every word in terms of its syntactical role ie nouns, verbs, adjectives, and missing the point of what they’re trying to analyse entirely. Same goes for synthetic listing, or whatever it is, that people seem so fond of these days.

The terminology is a bit of a red herring. You need to be able to talk competently about your subject, hence the assessment objective concerning it, but that doesn’t equate to you learning every possible rhetorical device ever observed or invented in the English language. I remember a year where there was an extract presented in the Shakespeare section which was virtually devoid of the things. People were trying to analyse commas in that one they were so desperate, but missed so many interesting developments in terms of character and setting that I could have cried.

Sometimes the thing that is significant about a text – usually, I should probably say – is not a device. It’s who is saying something, to whom, where, when and why they are saying it, and how, that is significant. Your analysis is an equation made up of those things, and that never changes, at whatever level you’re doing it.

The jump between GCSE and A level is not about the complexity of the devices you’re analysis. It’s about the complexity of the issues you’re examining in the texts and your ability to present complex arguments in response to them, supported consistently with accurate, specific and relevant analysis of the text. And doing it consistently.

There is no great long list of terms you need to know. You just need to understand your texts and their characters and their stories as well as possible. Understand them as human beings dealing with human problems and what the writer of their stories was trying to communicate to readers about human beings.
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redscarlett
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(Original post by giella)
Markers do not like terminology for the sake of terminology. The worst examples I often see at GCSE come in the form of students trying to label every word in terms of its syntactical role ie nouns, verbs, adjectives, and missing the point of what they’re trying to analyse entirely. Same goes for synthetic listing, or whatever it is, that people seem so fond of these days.

The terminology is a bit of a red herring. You need to be able to talk competently about your subject, hence the assessment objective concerning it, but that doesn’t equate to you learning every possible rhetorical device ever observed or invented in the English language. I remember a year where there was an extract presented in the Shakespeare section which was virtually devoid of the things. People were trying to analyse commas in that one they were so desperate, but missed so many interesting developments in terms of character and setting that I could have cried.

Sometimes the thing that is significant about a text – usually, I should probably say – is not a device. It’s who is saying something, to whom, where, when and why they are saying it, and how, that is significant. Your analysis is an equation made up of those things, and that never changes, at whatever level you’re doing it.

The jump between GCSE and A level is not about the complexity of the devices you’re analysis. It’s about the complexity of the issues you’re examining in the texts and your ability to present complex arguments in response to them, supported consistently with accurate, specific and relevant analysis of the text. And doing it consistently.

There is no great long list of terms you need to know. You just need to understand your texts and their characters and their stories as well as possible. Understand them as human beings dealing with human problems and what the writer of their stories was trying to communicate to readers about human beings.
I got told in a recent couple of essays - one on a contextual linking extract; another on Regeneration by Pat Barker - that I write too much like an academic. I don't delve deep enough into some of the structural aspects and skim over, so I need to hold back. Thanks for all this! I'll briefly look at some more terminology but the debate aspect is my strongpoint.
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giella
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Understanding structure is the key to A level English. I get the feeling you’re doing AQA based on your text so I would suggest this: really look at the mark scheme and the examiner’s reports for these. There are a lot of clues about what the examiners expect to see from these and not one of them will be about how well you can identify your zeugma from your chiasmus. Writers’ choices in storytelling ie what events occur, involving who, in what order and why (structure!!!) are far more interesting than the occasional linguistic device. Poetry probably involves a lot more devices than novels, to be fair, but even then, the writers are still just telling stories.

I’m not sure about feedback telling you your writing is too academic. Academic is what you’re aiming for so ask your teacher for further clarification about what she/he means by this.
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redscarlett
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(Original post by giella)
Understanding structure is the key to A level English. I get the feeling you’re doing AQA based on your text so I would suggest this: really look at the mark scheme and the examiner’s reports for these. There are a lot of clues about what the examiners expect to see from these and not one of them will be about how well you can identify your zeugma from your chiasmus. Writers’ choices in storytelling ie what events occur, involving who, in what order and why (structure!!!) are far more interesting than the occasional linguistic device. Poetry probably involves a lot more devices than novels, to be fair, but even then, the writers are still just telling stories.

I’m not sure about feedback telling you your writing is too academic. Academic is what you’re aiming for so ask your teacher for further clarification about what she/he means by this.
I will ask for further clarification thank you. I'll make sure to focus on structure and shall look at the mark schemes/reports to see what they want!! Good idea thanks so much
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redmeercat
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https://quizlet.com/meercatred/folde...h-a-level/sets

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