zoeeedf
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I'm deciding between biology and maths. I am a bit better at maths, but I know the jump is much bigger from GCSEs & A Levels, so I think the grades would average out to b the same. I want to keep my options open as I have no idea what I want to do in uni, so should I do biology or maths?
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johnnyliu8
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(Original post by zoeeedf)
I'm deciding between biology and maths. I am a bit better at maths, but I know the jump is much bigger from GCSEs & A Levels, so I think the grades would average out to b the same. I want to keep my options open as I have no idea what I want to do in uni, so should I do biology or maths?
I guess it really depends on what you wanna do in uni. Doing bio allows you to choose a life or health science course while doing math allows you to do an engineer or math base course. To me, math is easier because I'm good at it, so I don't know if it's the same thing with you. Bio is alot more reading and theory.
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artful_lounger
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Generally it's quite common for courses that require A-level Biology to also require A-level Chemistry, although there are some exceptions. Certainly many science degree courses will expect at least two science/maths subjects to be taken (even if they don't specify which the second subject is in). Taking individual sciences tends to not be as useful as taking them several together, both as far as degree entry criteria, as well as generally due to synergistic content in the subjects. It may be worth noting though, most STEM degree courses are available with a foundation year from a wide range of unis, so even if you have the "wrong" subjects it's usually possible to go into a degree course in that area.

A-level Maths is a prerequisite for a number of degree programmes, mostly in the STEM realm, but notably also most economics (and PPE) degrees and a number of business/finance type courses. These latter courses tend to not be available with a foundation year, so if you wanted to potentially move into one of those subjects you should plan to take A-level Maths. Within the STEM realm as above, it's common for both A-level Maths and A-level Physics (or a second science generally) to be required as a pair for courses in engineering and the physical sciences. However A-level Maths alone is also suitable background (and usually required) for CS degrees. Naturally maths degree will require A-level Maths, however you should really be planning to take A-level Further Maths if it's available to you for that degree.

Something to consider though is that A-level Maths requires quite a high level of ongoing commitment throughout the course - you can't "cram" for A-level Maths exams as such, and need to make sure you continually practice at it throughout the two years (certainly weekly at least, if not doing some work on it every day). Art and design subjects, as well as languages, likewise tend to have a high ongoing workload, so may be a lot to do with maths at the same time. Science subjects on the other hand may come in dribs and drabs a bit more as far as workload goes, so you may be able to more flexibly arrange your work in the sciences to allow you to focus on other subjects and deadlines if need be a bit more. What other subjects will you be taking?
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zoeeedf
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Generally it's quite common for courses that require A-level Biology to also require A-level Chemistry, although there are some exceptions. Certainly many science degree courses will expect at least two science/maths subjects to be taken (even if they don't specify which the second subject is in). Taking individual sciences tends to not be as useful as taking them several together, both as far as degree entry criteria, as well as generally due to synergistic content in the subjects. It may be worth noting though, most STEM degree courses are available with a foundation year from a wide range of unis, so even if you have the "wrong" subjects it's usually possible to go into a degree course in that area.

A-level Maths is a prerequisite for a number of degree programmes, mostly in the STEM realm, but notably also most economics (and PPE) degrees and a number of business/finance type courses. These latter courses tend to not be available with a foundation year, so if you wanted to potentially move into one of those subjects you should plan to take A-level Maths. Within the STEM realm as above, it's common for both A-level Maths and A-level Physics (or a second science generally) to be required as a pair for courses in engineering and the physical sciences. However A-level Maths alone is also suitable background (and usually required) for CS degrees. Naturally maths degree will require A-level Maths, however you should really be planning to take A-level Further Maths if it's available to you for that degree.

Something to consider though is that A-level Maths requires quite a high level of ongoing commitment throughout the course - you can't "cram" for A-level Maths exams as such, and need to make sure you continually practice at it throughout the two years (certainly weekly at least, if not doing some work on it every day). Art and design subjects, as well as languages, likewise tend to have a high ongoing workload, so may be a lot to do with maths at the same time. Science subjects on the other hand may come in dribs and drabs a bit more as far as workload goes, so you may be able to more flexibly arrange your work in the sciences to allow you to focus on other subjects and deadlines if need be a bit more. What other subjects will you be taking?
Im planning on taking psychology and geography
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by zoeeedf)
Im planning on taking psychology and geography
Well, psychology degrees usually require or at least prefer you take at least one core STEM subject - either A-level Biology or A-level Maths would suffice for that purpose. If you are confident in your maths ability, I would probably suggest A-level Maths. A-level Biology is quite "content heavy" in that you have to learn a large amount of information for the exams, which is also true of A-level Psychology (possibly also geography although I'm not personally very familiar with the subject since I stopped taking it in year 9 ), so you would have to learn a lot of material for your exams.

A-level Maths would also still allow you to apply to psychology courses as described above, but also give you the option of economics/PPE, finance/business, and CS courses. If you did decide you wanted to pursue the biological sciences (or even any other science course) at uni, you would still have that option via a foundation year as above

Is it possible to start with both subjects and drop one a bit later? Perhaps ask your school about the possibility of "trialling" both maths and biology and see which you like better in the first month or so, and then make your choice when you've had some experience of each.
Last edited by artful_lounger; 6 days ago
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zoeeedf
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Well, psychology degrees usually require or at least prefer you take at least one core STEM subject - either A-level Biology or A-level Maths would suffice for that purpose. If you are confident in your maths ability, I would probably suggest A-level Maths. A-level Biology is quite "content heavy" in that you have to learn a large amount of information for the exams, which is also true of A-level Psychology (possibly also geography although I'm not personally very familiar with the subject since I stopped taking it in year 9 ), so you would have to learn a lot of material for your exams.

A-level Maths would also still allow you to apply to psychology courses as described above, but also give you the option of economics/PPE, finance/business, and CS courses. If you did decide you wanted to pursue the biological sciences (or even any other science course) at uni, you would still have that option via a foundation year as above

Is it possible to start with both subjects and drop one a bit later? Perhaps ask your school about the possibility of "trialling" both maths and biology and see which you like better in the first month or so, and then make your choice when you've had some experience of each.
thanks so much this was really helpful xx
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ywbfcihwcjownc
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(Original post by zoeeedf)
I'm deciding between biology and maths. I am a bit better at maths, but I know the jump is much bigger from GCSEs & A Levels, so I think the grades would average out to b the same. I want to keep my options open as I have no idea what I want to do in uni, so should I do biology or maths?
Do both at AS levels, whichever you feel can take further do that then.
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