If Northern Ireland unites with Ireland, will the Loyalists start a conflict? Watch

Ferrograd
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Like not a war between the UK and Ireland. But say if there is a referendum, and people in NI vote to join the ROI, will the loyalists start fighting the Irish etc?
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SMEGGGY
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There won't be reunification. Leave it as it is, part of the UK.

England
Scotland
Wales
Northern Ireland

🇬🇧
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UCAS_Expert
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(Original post by Ferrograd)
Like not a war between the UK and Ireland. But say if there is a referendum, and people in NI vote to join the ROI, will the loyalists start fighting the Irish etc?
I would expect some civil unrest in NI itself.

One issue for what remains of the UK (Great Britain) and Ireland to sort out is some sort of financial settlement for all the investments, buildings, infrastructure etc that the UK has paid for and/or owns.

And then there is private property. I own a flat in Belfast, but live in Liverpool. What will happen once I become a 'foreign' property owner?
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Ferrograd
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(Original post by SMEGGGY)
There won't be reunification. Leave it as it is, part of the UK.

England
Scotland
Wales
Northern Ireland

🇬🇧
Think of it this way. Sinn Fein just got the largest share of votes in the Irish election. Unionist parties got the least votes in the General Election this year. I'd say Irish reunification is probably more likely than Scotland leaving the UK.
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Ferrograd
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(Original post by UCAS_Expert)
I would expect some civil unrest in NI itself.

One issue for what remains of the UK (Great Britain) and Ireland to sort out is some sort of financial settlement for all the investments, buildings, infrastructure etc that the UK has paid for and/or owns.

And then there is private property. I own a flat in Belfast, but live in Liverpool. What will happen once I become a 'foreign' property owner?
I actually doubt it would make a difference. People in the UK have been able to travel, live, and work freely in the ROI since the introduction of the Irish Free State in 1921.
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SMEGGGY
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(Original post by Ferrograd)
Think of it this way. Sinn Fein just got the largest share of votes in the Irish election. Unionist parties got the least votes in the General Election this year. I'd say Irish reunification is probably more likely than Scotland leaving the UK.
Yes they gained in the elections, there was no mention of reunification in the campaign by SF.
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UCAS_Expert
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(Original post by Ferrograd)
I actually doubt it would make a difference. People in the UK have been able to travel, live, and work freely in the ROI since the introduction of the Irish Free State in 1921.
But there may be tax implications etc.

I do agree that recent elections and Brexit has made reunification more likely if, and a big if, the UK government allowed another referendum on the issue. Which is unlikely. Especially after their experience of the Brexit referendum which they thought was so clearly going to go remain and didn't.
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Ferrograd
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(Original post by UCAS_Expert)
But there may be tax implications etc.

I do agree that recent elections and Brexit has made reunification more likely if, and a big if, the UK government allowed another referendum on the issue. Which is unlikely. Especially after their experience of the Brexit referendum which they thought was so clearly going to go remain and didn't.
Having said that, it would probably be easier to just to relinquish their claims on NI and hand it over. There could be all sorts of weird complications if we don't get a deal sorted with the EU, one of which for example would involve Northern Ireland using a different time zone to the rest of the UK for six months of the year, as well as possible re-introduction of border checks. I'd have no problem personally losing Northern Ireland, they are not a key part of hte UK like Scotland is where they are attatched to us, they have no real economic value and if anything are a burden. Plus you'd get rid of the IRA, although as I mentioned, you'd just get Loyalist paramilitary groups and guerillas
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Rakas21
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(Original post by Ferrograd)
Like not a war between the UK and Ireland. But say if there is a referendum, and people in NI vote to join the ROI, will the loyalists start fighting the Irish etc?
While i doubt it will happen anytime soon (Scottish Independence is a much greater risk) i would expect that most people would accept the result however yes, you'd probably expect some terrorist activity in protest. Contrary to what many believe, Ireland was far from unified in its decision to split all those years ago.
(Original post by Ferrograd)
Think of it this way. Sinn Fein just got the largest share of votes in the Irish election. Unionist parties got the least votes in the General Election this year. I'd say Irish reunification is probably more likely than Scotland leaving the UK.
Sinn Fein got 24% of the vote south of the border and lacks the numbers to form the government right now. At any rate the opinion south of the border is somewhat irrelevant. North of the border the DUP won the general election in NI and while unionist support is below 50%, it is the Alliance who have benefited and they are not nationalists (think lib dems who don't want to talk about nationalism in any form) so as things stand the numbers to force a referendum north of the border are not there and it would be unlikely to pass if there was one.

In Scotland the SNP not only have a large plurality of the vote but they have a majority with the Greens in the Scottish Parliament. A far greater threat (indeed i personally think Con-Lib need to do some deal in Scotland).
(Original post by Ferrograd)
I actually doubt it would make a difference. People in the UK have been able to travel, live, and work freely in the ROI since the introduction of the Irish Free State in 1921.
That's because in UK law Ireland is not treated as a foreign country, it has a special status. Unfortunately with their love of the EU and betrayal in the recent negotiations that may have to change (although many unionists like myself do dream of allowing them to rejoin the union).
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UCAS_Expert
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(Original post by Rakas21)
That's because in UK law Ireland is not treated as a foreign country, it has a special status. Unfortunately with their love of the EU and betrayal in the recent negotiations that may have to change (although many unionists like myself do dream of allowing them to rejoin the union).
Who did Eire betray?
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