Low grades apply to PhD in oncology at Oxford Watch

Shanlin
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Hi! The minimal requirement for PhD in oncology is a strong upper second. I have only an upper second and i do not know if i do not meet the minimal requirement, am i still possible to apply?

My friend told me PhD admission depends on the PI. If he is willing to accept you, the grades won't be any issue. The only problem with that is to find a funding. If i have a PI and I take PhD loans to self-fund my PhD, does that mean I still have a chance to get in?
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hfpc56
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(Original post by Shanlin)
Hi! The minimal requirement for PhD in oncology is a strong upper second. I have only an upper second and i do not know if i do not meet the minimal requirement, am i still possible to apply?

My friend told me PhD admission depends on the PI. If he is willing to accept you, the grades won't be any issue. The only problem with that is to find a funding. If i have a PI and I take PhD loans to self-fund my PhD, does that mean I still have a chance to get in?
Hi, I have just received a funded offer - maybe I can provide a bit of insight. First, you should absolutely apply - you have nothing to lose but everything to gain! There are many contributing factors to successful PhD applications, and grades are only one part of it. Perhaps you did particularly well in research modules, or in cancer related modules (definitely try and highlight these)? Or maybe there were extenuating circumstances helping explain why you couldn't reach your full academic potential whilst at uni? If this is the case, postgraduate masters courses (MRes/MSc's) can be great to demonstrate your academic potential in the field you are interested in, making your PhD application more competitive!

It also depends on many other factors, such as previous research experience and techniques you have learnt, the strength of your three letters of recommendation, and emailing and discussing the project with the supervisor either in person or by skype (highly recommended, it also helps you see if you would work well together / get along).

What I am trying to say is that a strong 2:1 meets the minimum requirements and if you can supplement this with research experience, maybe a publication, and good references - you absolutely could be made an offer, but you will never know unless you try!

P.S. please don't take an unfunded PhD though - although you may be able to cover course fees and living expenses at a push, you will also need funding for your bench fees/consumables etc. over 3-4 years (research is expensive!). It would be much more beneficial to take a year out (maybe work in industry or as a research assistant for a year) and apply next year.
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0le
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Don't waste your money doing a non-funded PhD. There is a rule somewhere I think which states you need a minimum of a 2:2, but most universities say you need a 2:1 or 1st. Your friend is correct, a lot of it depends on the supervisor.
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Shanlin
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(Original post by hfpc56)
Hi, I have just received a funded offer - maybe I can provide a bit of insight. First, you should absolutely apply - you have nothing to lose but everything to gain! There are many contributing factors to successful PhD applications, and grades are only one part of it. Perhaps you did particularly well in research modules, or in cancer related modules (definitely try and highlight these)? Or maybe there were extenuating circumstances helping explain why you couldn't reach your full academic potential whilst at uni? If this is the case, postgraduate masters courses (MRes/MSc's) can be great to demonstrate your academic potential in the field you are interested in, making your PhD application more competitive!

It also depends on many other factors, such as previous research experience and techniques you have learnt, the strength of your three letters of recommendation, and emailing and discussing the project with the supervisor either in person or by skype (highly recommended, it also helps you see if you would work well together / get along).

What I am trying to say is that a strong 2:1 meets the minimum requirements and if you can supplement this with research experience, maybe a publication, and good references - you absolutely could be made an offer, but you will never know unless you try!

P.S. please don't take an unfunded PhD though - although you may be able to cover course fees and living expenses at a push, you will also need funding for your bench fees/consumables etc. over 3-4 years (research is expensive!). It would be much more beneficial to take a year out (maybe work in industry or as a research assistant for a year) and apply next year.
Very motivating and informative comment! Many thanks to hfpc56! Will try my best to work on it!
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reaaaad
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(Original post by hfpc56)
Hi, I have just received a funded offer - maybe I can provide a bit of insight. First, you should absolutely apply - you have nothing to lose but everything to gain! There are many contributing factors to successful PhD applications, and grades are only one part of it. Perhaps you did particularly well in research modules, or in cancer related modules (definitely try and highlight these)? Or maybe there were extenuating circumstances helping explain why you couldn't reach your full academic potential whilst at uni? If this is the case, postgraduate masters courses (MRes/MSc's) can be great to demonstrate your academic potential in the field you are interested in, making your PhD application more competitive!

It also depends on many other factors, such as previous research experience and techniques you have learnt, the strength of your three letters of recommendation, and emailing and discussing the project with the supervisor either in person or by skype (highly recommended, it also helps you see if you would work well together / get along).

What I am trying to say is that a strong 2:1 meets the minimum requirements and if you can supplement this with research experience, maybe a publication, and good references - you absolutely could be made an offer, but you will never know unless you try!

P.S. please don't take an unfunded PhD though - although you may be able to cover course fees and living expenses at a push, you will also need funding for your bench fees/consumables etc. over 3-4 years (research is expensive!). It would be much more beneficial to take a year out (maybe work in industry or as a research assistant for a year) and apply next year.
Hi hfpc56,
I was wondering if your project is still advertised on findaphd. I had an interview in the end of January and haven't heard back since and the project is still on findaphd. So I was thinking they are looking for a candidate who is better?
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hfpc56
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(Original post by reaaaad)
Hi hfpc56,
I was wondering if your project is still advertised on findaphd. I had an interview in the end of January and haven't heard back since and the project is still on findaphd. So I was thinking they are looking for a candidate who is better?
My project is still listed on findaphd, even though I have been made an offer by the supervisor - so I wouldn't read too much into it I think, offers are likely to still be given out over the next few weeks I would imagine. I think it just gets advertised for a set amount of time on findaphd irrespective of whether they have found a candidate.

Good luck with your application, I have my fingers crossed for you!
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