Live off benefits or work? Watch

Anonymous #1
#1
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#1
Should I live off universal credit or work and get a little bit more?
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Anonymous #1
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#2
The little bit more not exactly be worth it
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Kitten in boots
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#3
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You'd need really impressive budgeting skills to manage a reasonable lifestyle while relying on universal credit.
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squeakysquirrel
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#4
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Should I live off universal credit or work and get a little bit more?
Why why why would you choose universal credit. No pension other than basic. No sense of worth. Not use to society. Basically an oxygen thief. Challenge me on that. My taxes are paying turn you to do sweet fa
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Kitten in boots)
You'd need really impressive budgeting skills to manage a reasonable lifestyle while relying on universal credit.
My spending habits are minimal
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
Why why why would you choose universal credit. No pension other than basic. No sense of worth. Not use to society. Basically an oxygen thief. Challenge me on that. My taxes are paying turn you to do sweet fa
I'm tellin mum off you, squirrel! That was just mean. What a meany pants.

On a real though, I get you. It just feels rubbish spending my gap year working super hard to just get a little more than UC. I feel like maybe the experience I gain could mean something but maybe not.
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hartley131
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What are your goals and aspirations?

A job gives you self worth, skills, opportunities, awareness, new friends, sense of community...
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by hartley131)
What are your goals and aspirations?

A job gives you self worth, skills, opportunities, awareness, new friends, sense of community...
I know this to be true because I recently got a new job. I just feel like it was nice chilling on benefits like I didn't even need more than the amount I was being given.
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MoonlightRain
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm tellin mum off you, squirrel! That was just mean. What a meany pants.

On a real though, I get you. It just feels rubbish spending my gap year working super hard to just get a little more than UC. I feel like maybe the experience I gain could mean something but maybe not.
But why would you waste a gap year. I am in Estonia at the moment but have just come from Latvia where jobs are going begging even if you don't speak the language.

When I had my gap year I went to France. God go and do chalet work in a ski resort. Learn a language in Colombia do not wasteit
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londonmyst
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#11
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Earn your own money, pay your own way and leave UC funds for those who desperately need it to survive & have almost no other lawful options of obtaining money available to them.
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Vexper
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Should I live off universal credit or work and get a little bit more?
I'd just like to highlight that Universal Credit is a benefit that you can work whilst being entitled to it as long as your earnings don't reduce your entitlement to Nil. So you can do both up to a point. Work and claim UC.

(Original post by londonmyst)
Earn your own money, pay your own way and leave UC funds for those who desperately need it to survive & have almost no other lawful options of obtaining money available to them.
UC is not a 'last option' for obtaining financial support, welfare is available to anyone who meets the conditions of entitlement and there are other potential positives to claiming UC beyond just getting the money. This is an icky view and actually gives off this stereotypical impression that claiming benefits is for 'desperate' people which makes people opt to rather self-destruct than make a claim.
Last edited by Vexper; 2 weeks ago
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londonmyst
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(Original post by Vexper)
UC is not a 'last option' for obtaining financial support, welfare is available to anyone who meets the conditions of entitlement and there are other potential positives to claiming UC beyond just getting the money. This is an icky view and actually gives off this stereotypical impression that claiming benefits is for 'desperate' people which makes people opt to rather self-destruct than make a claim.
We'll have to agree to disagree.

I believe in the British welfare system as a safety net only, for those uk citizens who are most in need.
Not choosing to live off the welfare state as a matter of reflex, family tradition or personal pride.
In relation to young, reasonably healthy people without criminal records who are capable of earning their own living.

I'm not an advocate of high levels of taxation and public spending- especially not to fund welfare spending binges.
To me welfare benefits like UC funds, pension credit and income support are for those who desperately need it to survive.
Not for people with other options available to them within the law.
I work three jobs, live off under £30 a week after rent & bills and have never claimed any state benefits.

I'm aware of the implementation and reasoning behind the inept Cameron-Clegg coalition era reforms combining multiple benefits into one UC payment.
I am also very familiar with the type of rhetoric that is used in the attempt to remove the social stigma from choosing to live off welfare benefits.
I grew up around an abundance of activists who spent their spare time assisting british & overseas citizens to apply for as many uk welfare benefits as possible; the type of activists that start snarling loudly upon hearing anything vaguely resembling the "nation of strivers v spongers" narrative.
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Sammylou40
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#14
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm tellin mum off you, squirrel! That was just mean. What a meany pants.

On a real though, I get you. It just feels rubbish spending my gap year working super hard to just get a little more than UC. I feel like maybe the experience I gain could mean something but maybe not.
You’re seriously thinking of spending your gap year sponging??!
from my limited understanding of UC, you are expected to spend 35 hours per week either on courses or job hunting anyway to avoid sanctions so you may as well earn your own money, broadening your education and skills. After all, nothing will be more inviting on your cv than the year that says couldn’t be bothered to get off my arse and be productive.
life on UC is tough. Too tough in my opinion for those who are genuinely deserving. But unless you have a medical condition that prevents you from doing something then you need to get out there and get on with it
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Other_Owl
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#15
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#15
WORK. End of story.
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
But why would you waste a gap year. I am in Estonia at the moment but have just come from Latvia where jobs are going begging even if you don't speak the language.

When I had my gap year I went to France. God go and do chalet work in a ski resort. Learn a language in Colombia do not wasteit
yes, because the pay is so crap...
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Reality Check
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#17
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Should I live off universal credit or work and get a little bit more?
It's just a bit indicative of your general personality, isn't it? "Can I be arsed to make things better for myself by my own endeavours, or am I happier to take taxpayer's money because I can't be arsed'.

Not great, is it? Particularly for someone your age: if you have no motivation or get-up-and-go now, when will you?
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nathan_nacu
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#18
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#18
(Original post by Anonymous)
Should I live off universal credit or work and get a little bit more?
If anyone tells you not to get UC ignore them. If you’re eligible for it by standards set by the government then you are just as eligible as anyone else and should use what you are entitled to. The ‘leave for those worse off’ debate is tiring and i never understood ppl telling those who meet the requirements set by the government to claim the payment not to claim them, surely they must be in their own situation to be eligible🤷🏽*♂️ if i was eligible for it and it would make my life easier and comfortable i’d get it and that’s on periodt, ik someone getting universal credit that pays her rent and lets her live her best life without a job (she’s estranged from her parents) so why would she get a job and stress for maybe even less when she’s eligible and can get it for FREE😩 secure ur benefits sis!
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Vexper
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#19
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(Original post by londonmyst)
We'll have to agree to disagree.

I believe in the British welfare system as a safety net only, for those uk citizens who are most in need.
Not choosing to live off the welfare state as a matter of reflex, family tradition or personal pride.
In relation to young, reasonably healthy people without criminal records who are capable of earning their own living.

I'm not an advocate of high levels of taxation and public spending- especially not to fund welfare spending binges.
To me welfare benefits like UC funds, pension credit and income support are for those who desperately need it to survive.
Not for people with other options available to them within the law.
I work three jobs, live off under £30 a week after rent & bills and have never claimed any state benefits.

I'm aware of the implementation and reasoning behind the inept Cameron-Clegg coalition era reforms combining multiple benefits into one UC payment.
I am also very familiar with the type of rhetoric that is used in the attempt to remove the social stigma from choosing to live off welfare benefits.
I grew up around an abundance of activists who spent their spare time assisting british & overseas citizens to apply for as many uk welfare benefits as possible; the type of activists that start snarling loudly upon hearing anything vaguely resembling the "nation of strivers v spongers" narrative.
I guess we will, because it just generally sounds like you don't actually possess a reasonable foundation of knowledge on both means/non-means benefits to hold any strong view without appearing ignorant. Just your post itself suggests a very strong stereotypical view of what type of people you want and expect to be on benefits. Sad outlook, and also prevelant on TSR. Nothing new.

I work three jobs, live off under £30 a week after rent & bills and have never claimed any state benefits.
Pride doesn't put more food on the table for your kids with this outlook. I'm glad you feel like you're above everyone on benefits and the view looks really good up there with £30.00 a week to live on. Crack on. Another fool to go on the ignore list.
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ajj2000
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#20
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#20
(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm tellin mum off you, squirrel! That was just mean. What a meany pants.

On a real though, I get you. It just feels rubbish spending my gap year working super hard to just get a little more than UC. I feel like maybe the experience I gain could mean something but maybe not.
Why would you only earn a bit more if you are working super hard? The experience will be valuable in the future. Being unemployed for a year is psychologically terrible and a bit black mark on your CV.
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