aleenapaul
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Hi,
Not sure how to integrate this question...can anyone explain how I could solve it
Integrate: xe^x2 (limits 2 and 0)
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Sir Cumference
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(Original post by aleenapaul)
Hi,
Not sure how to integrate this question...can anyone explain how I could solve it
Integrate: xe^x2 (limits 2 and 0)
I'm assuming you mean xe^{x^2}?

Notice that x is a constant away from the derivative of x^2. Does that hint you towards a method?

If not, what have you already tried?
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Harrybeld
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(Original post by aleenapaul)
Hi,
Not sure how to integrate this question...can anyone explain how I could solve it
Integrate: xe^x2 (limits 2 and 0)
Use the substitution u=x^2 and go from there
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juugsailorshawty
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(Original post by Harrybeld)
Use the substitution u=x^2 and go from there
well u probably know how to differentiate e^x^2 (like any other e^x term) so try going from there. i think it's reverse chain rule.
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Harrybeld
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(Original post by juugsailorshawty)
well u probably know how to differentiate e^x^2 (like any other e^x term) so try going from there. i think it's reverse chain rule.
A substitution would be way easier than using integration by parts (which I assume is what you mean by the reverse chain rule). The integral you would end up with would be harder than the one you started with.
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juugsailorshawty
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(Original post by Harrybeld)
A substitution would be way easier than using integration by parts (which I assume is what you mean by the reverse chain rule). The integral you would end up with would be harder than the one you started with.
no that isn't very reverse chain rulish to do integration by parts, there's a separate method called reverse chain rule however
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dextrous63
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(Original post by juugsailorshawty)
no that isn't very reverse chain rulish to do integration by parts, there's a separate method called reverse chain rule however
Sorry, but even mentioning "by parts" is nonsense. The reverse chain rule and by substitution are synonymous.
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Harrybeld
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(Original post by dextrous63)
Sorry, but even mentioning "by parts" is nonsense. The reverse chain rule and by substitution are synonymous.
alright mate don't cry about it
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aleenapaul
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(Original post by Harrybeld)
Use the substitution u=x^2 and go from there
(Original post by Harrybeld)
A substitution would be way easier than using integration by parts (which I assume is what you mean by the reverse chain rule). The integral you would end up with would be harder than the one you started with.
thank you
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