DarkShadow101
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It is believed by everyone that energy cannot be created/destroyed - as stated as the conservation of energy. However, where did the energy come from at the beginning? Some say its from the big bang but then doesn't that mean energy can be created?
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Sinnoh
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Perhaps once we know exactly what happened at the initial singularity this question will have an answer ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Energy conservation is a key part of many laws of physics, but they don't do a great job of describing the exact beginning of the Big Bang.
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username3118454
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I thought the big bang was just the expansion of the universe - maybe the energy/matter was always there
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the bear
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maybe there is like, negative energy in the Ooniverse.

:hmmmm2:
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the bear
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so ordinary energy can be converted into ordinary matter, and negative energy into dark matter

:hat2:
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Marsharko
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You're not going to find the answer on TSR.
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Sinnoh
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Actually I amend my previous answer. You can violate conservation of energy... if you don't do it for too long. That's thanks to the uncertainty principle. You do get quantum fluctuations where the energy at a point in space does suddenly and randomly change, creating virtual particles that disappear straight away again.

For a reasonable chance of these quantum fluctuations to cause new inflation you'd have to wait 10^{10^{10^{56}}} seconds, years, millennia (whatever, doesn't matter at this scale)
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JoshDarnIt_
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I believe I know the answer to this.

If you divide the quantum flux capacitor with the star tetrahedron, you get a result of 0.000000000001 which indicates that the dinosaurs were far smarter than humans and were capable of inter molecular disposition. This goes on to show that we can't figure out the mass of such an object. In conclusion, we may be able to take those laws back by force but that can only result in the happy tears of fallen presidents. R.I.P Obama <3
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0le
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No one knows, but questions like this are good to ask because it stimulates interesting discussion of physics, so well done for thinking about these things!
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DarkShadow101
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(Original post by 0le)
No one knows, but questions like this are good to ask because it stimulates interesting discussion of physics, so well done for thinking about these
Aha, i always ask these odd questions to my physics teacher and he's always so confused
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0le
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(Original post by DarkShadow101)
Aha, i always ask these odd questions to my physics teacher and he's always so confused
Many people are confused by these topics, so I'd be surprised if he wasn't confused to be honest!

You may also find watching this programme of interest:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episod...ing-things-out
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KasaiRyujin
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The answer is god created energy . God unlike humans doesn’t need to come from something and has always existed
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Eimmanuel
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(Original post by Sinnoh)
Actually I amend my previous answer. You can violate conservation of energy... if you don't do it for too long. That's thanks to the uncertainty principle. You do get quantum fluctuations where the energy at a point in space does suddenly and randomly change, creating virtual particles that disappear straight away again.

For a reasonable chance of these quantum fluctuations to cause new inflation you'd have to wait 10^{10^{10^{56}}} seconds, years, millennia (whatever, doesn't matter at this scale)

It seems that you have read some pop-science articles or books that lure you into thinking that the law of conservation of energy can be violated based on the uncertainty principle. Sometimes, I also find such description slipped into some introductory university physics texts and it is really very unfortunate. I disagree and would say it is not entirely correct. As far as I know, this type of description is trying to describe what the mathematical formalism or calculation using some “laymen” language and it is certainly NOT what is happening in the experiment.

You may want to check with some experts in quantum field theory or particle physicists.
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