Get into Teaching
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Teacher Training structures, eligibility criteria and qualifications change over time, and as a result a lot of hear-say and mythologies arise. Here are some we most often encounter -
  1. An aspiring teacher needs (a lots of) classroom experience before they apply for a teacher training course…

Nope, you don’t need any! However, this is a career that you can do (and enjoy) for many years, and so a little taste of what it’s like before, will confirm that you are choosing the right age group and subject to apply. It will also allow you to check out local schools for when you are applying for your teaching jobs.
  1. An aspiring teacher needs to choose the best teacher training ‘route’ for them to apply to...

In recent years, there has been a huge expansion in the institutions that are able to accredit teachers in England. As a result, aspiring teachers have been led to understand that different ‘routes’ into teaching will be better or worse for them. However, there are better and worse course provider in every ‘route’ and so it’s vital to check them out individually. The biggest decision to make is would you like to be an employee or a student teacher? For the employees, you are not eligible to student finance or bursaries, as you’d be paid as an unqualified teacher. You would take responsibility for the progress of the classes you teach. Examples of these courses are – School Direct (Salaried), Post-Graduate Teaching Apprenticeships, and Teach First.

The alternative courses are run by universities or schools, and allow the aspiring teacher to teach someone else’s classes. The qualified teacher would observe and coach you through your teaching and spot what’s going well, (Beginner teachers are excellent in spotting what went wrong in a lesson) and help you to build on your successes. You do pay fees for this type of course, but you would be able to apply for student finance, and other financial support. Examples of these are – University led teacher training, School Centred Initial Teacher Training (SCITT) and School Direct.
  1. An aspiring teacher needs to apply by January to get a place on a teacher training course...

While there is a deadline for undergraduate teacher training courses that also awards QTS in January (before clearing begins), it isn’t true for post-graduate teacher training. While PG courses can close on a first come-first served basis, the application portal does not close to new applications until September, and so you can apply right up until then.

In a fast paced and dynamic application process, the Get into Teaching teams are able to help aspiring teachers understand what they need to do to successfully apply for a teacher training course.

It’s a free support service, offered by fully qualified and experienced teachers, who are expert in the application process. You would need to register here, or call 0800 389 2500. (Mon – Fri, 8am – 8pm) for an adviser to help you with every step of the application and to bust any myths you may have heard!
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Get into Teaching)
Teacher Training structures, eligibility criteria and qualifications change over time, and as a result a lot of hear-say and mythologies arise. Here are some we most often encounter -
  1. An aspiring teacher needs (a lots of) classroom experience before they apply for a teacher training course…

Nope, you don’t need any!
You're seriously suggesting that a candidate would be accepted onto a good PGCE course with zero experience of what a classroom is like?

Don't be silly.
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Get into Teaching
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(Original post by Reality Check)
You're seriously suggesting that a candidate would be accepted onto a good PGCE course with zero experience of what a classroom is like?

Don't be silly.
Indeed, there are many strong candidates offered places on outstanding teacher training courses with little or no classroom experience. It is not a recruitment criteria, unlike having the GCSE/Degree qualifications.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Get into Teaching)
Indeed, there are many strong candidates offered places on outstanding teacher training courses with little or no classroom experience. It is not a recruitment criteria, unlike having the GCSE/Degree qualifications.
From your very own website:

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If arranging school experience is important enough that 'less is never more', why are you suggesting so breezily that it's irrelevant?

I have worked in this area. It is a ridiculous suggestion that a competitive PGCE course, such as that provided at the University of Cambridge, would be willing to accept applicants who had no experience of a classroom. They are not, and with good reason. Experience of the classroom, and all the horrors therein are vital to ensure applicants have a realistic idea of what they're letting themselves in for. You might as well suggest that medical applicants need not bother with any sort of prior experience of healthcare, or veterinary applicants can just skip the work experience bit.

Ridiculous.
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remussjhj01
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(Original post by Reality Check)
From your very own website:

Name:  Screen Shot 2020-02-14 at 10.35.49.png
Views: 9
Size:  51.2 KB
If arranging school experience is important enough that 'less is never more', why are you suggesting so breezily that it's irrelevant?

I have worked in this area. It is a ridiculous suggestion that a competitive PGCE course, such as that provided at the University of Cambridge, would be willing to accept applicants who had no experience of a classroom. They are not, and with good reason. Experience of the classroom, and all the horrors therein are vital to ensure applicants have a realistic idea of what they're letting themselves in for. You might as well suggest that medical applicants need not bother with any sort of prior experience of healthcare, or veterinary applicants can just skip the work experience bit.

Ridiculous.
I think they're saying that experience is not a requirement set by the government. I would think most teacher training courses would require at least some level of experience.
Having more work experience would be good in most situations, even if it's not compulsory. I do see your point though. Whilst it's not necessarily compulsory, it is often considered an important part of preparing for teacher training, and shouldn't be downplayed as if you shouldn't do it if you've got the chance.
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Get into Teaching
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There is a myth that candidates applying for teacher training places must have recent experience of a school or classroom setting. This is not the case, and many people do make successful applications to reputable teacher training course providers without classroom experience. Teacher Training course providers are experienced in seeking out the potential of aspiring teachers to become outstanding teaching practitioners.

However, as stated in the original post, any classroom experience would have several benefits. These include confirmation that an application for such a training course would be suitable, that the correct age group/subject is chosen, a knowledge of local schools, ease of reflecting on the classroom experience in the personal statement and at interview, etc.

While there are clear reasons an aspiring teachers may attempt to achieve some, classroom experience is not a mandated entry requirement for a teacher training provider.
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sarskinz
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Is it better to take a salaried route or an unsalaried one?
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Get into Teaching
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(Original post by sarskinz)
Is it better to take a salaried route or an unsalaried one?
Hello!

It is utterly dependant on someones personal circumstances or experiences, and the choices of local teacher training providers. Anyone considering applying for a teacher training course needs to be fully informed about all of their options, to make a suitable and informed choice.

Jane
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Claudette
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I’m with Reality Check on the experience thing. I’ve had years of experience working in schools as a TA and HLTA but even so it’s still extremely hard and no wonder there is a high drop out rate not only of trainees but of teachers in their first few years of teaching. I still think course providers need to use their discretion with this.
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