Why do some essay-based subjects have coursework while others don't? Watch

Tolgarda
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First things first (in my mind, anyway). I know the official term is ‘non-exam assessment’ (NEA), but I plan to call it by its former name in this post since I've seen most people refer to this kind of assessment that way.

I also want to say that this post is neither for nor against coursework. While I am definitely not in favour of coursework for personal reasons, I can see why may be necessary for some subjects, while it isn't so much for others.

However, I think it is mostly necessary for essay-based subjects, since pupils that take these will most likely be reading disciplines that typically involve a profusion of coursework, which will be in the form of essays. It seems that when A Levels were reformed, this assumption was made for English language, English literature, history and geography. Twenty per cent of the final grade in the aforementioned subjects is still coursework.

However, other subjects which place a heavy emphasis on essay writing, if not are completely based on it, seem to lack a coursework component. This includes the following subjects: sociology, religious studies, law, philosophy, politics, economics and psychology.

What is the rationale behind this? In my opinion, it seems silly that politics or theology wouldn't require coursework while history and geography do. Or, am I the asinine one that fails to see an important detail?

Thanks in advance for any contributions to the discussion. It is much appreciated.
Last edited by Tolgarda; 6 days ago
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Tolgarda
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(Original post by Tolgarda)
First things first (in my mind, anyway). I know the official term is ‘non-exam assessment’ (NEA), but I plan to call it by its former name in this post since I've seen most people refer to this kind of assessment that way.

I also want to say that this post is neither for nor against coursework. While I am definitely not in favour of coursework for personal reasons, I can see why may be necessary for some subjects, while it isn't so much for others.

However, I think it is mostly necessary for essay-based subjects, since pupils that take these will most likely be reading disciplines that typically involve a profusion of coursework, which will be in the form of essays. It seems that when A Levels were reformed, this assumption was made for English language, English literature, history and geography. Twenty per cent of the final grade in the aforementioned subjects is still coursework.

However, other subjects which place a heavy emphasis on essay writing, if not are completely based on it, seem to lack a coursework component. This includes the following subjects: sociology, religious studies, law, philosophy, politics, economics and psychology.

What is the rationale behind this? In my opinion, it seems silly that politics or theology wouldn't require coursework while history and geography do. Or, am I the asinine one that fails to see an important detail?

Thanks in advance for any contributions to the discussion. It is much appreciated.
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