Thelazylearner12
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I have offers from Warwick and UCL. Even though UCL is a top university for law ( high in league tables and close to firms), I do not think that I will enjoy student life in London. Will I be in for a good chance of getting a TC if I went to Warwick despite it not being 'as good'.
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Brutal Bee
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Would be interesting to see what advice is given because I am in a similar sort of situation.
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J Papi
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(Original post by Thelazylearner12)
I have offers from Warwick and UCL. Even though UCL is a top university for law ( high in league tables and close to firms), I do not think that I will enjoy student life in London. Will I be in for a good chance of getting a TC if I went to Warwick despite it not being 'as good'.
Yes
(Original post by Law-yer)
Would be interesting to see what advice is given because I am in a similar sort of situation.
It's fine to not want to study in London.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Thelazylearner12)
I have offers from Warwick and UCL. Even though UCL is a top university for law ( high in league tables and close to firms), I do not think that I will enjoy student life in London. Will I be in for a good chance of getting a TC if I went to Warwick despite it not being 'as good'.
Warwick is still a great uni, you have nothing to worry about. London's not for everyone and you should choose the uni where you think you will be happiest
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PetitePanda
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You still have a good chance because it's not the name of the uni they really focus on, its your grades at that uni and your overall application - plus warwick is still a good uni
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Thelazylearner12
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Thank you for all your advice x
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Brutal Bee
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(Original post by J Papi)
It's fine to not want to study in London.
I have read quite a bit of advice on league tables being useless and a poor way to select universities. Still the idea of one being better (for academic reputation) than the other lingers in my mind.

Do you think there is a notable difference between Durham and Bristol for Law, large enough for one to ignore other aspects of a university such as the location, cost and so on?
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J Papi
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(Original post by Law-yer)
Do you think there is a notable difference between Durham and Bristol for Law, large enough for one to ignore other aspects of a university such as the location, cost and so on?
No, I don't

Bristol has a strong law faculty with several distinguished academics in it
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Brutal Bee
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(Original post by J Papi)
No, I don't

Bristol has a strong law faculty with several distinguished academics in it
.....
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J Papi
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I don't play these games. Each university will have its strengths and weaknesses. Faculty move around. My impression may be already out of date.

I've thought about doing a crude quant. survey of faculty at universities like these (e.g. total number of researchers, Professors, FBAs, professors in practice, QC (hons), etc.) but it would be meaningless other than in telling us that Oxford is the best and that there's still an Oxbridge vs London vs the rest divide in this country when it comes to legal research. The fact that Ken Oliphant lectures at Bristol and not Durham will not mean anything to a second year law student who doesn't like tort or want to engage in further study/research around it.
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Brutal Bee
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(Original post by J Papi)
I don't play these games. Each university will have its strengths and weaknesses. Faculty move around. My impression may be already out of date.

I've thought about doing a crude quant. survey of faculty at universities like these (e.g. total number of researchers, Professors, FBAs, professors in practice, QC (hons), etc.) but it would be meaningless other than in telling us that Oxford is the best and that there's still an Oxbridge vs London vs the rest divide in this country when it comes to legal research. The fact that Ken Oliphant lectures at Bristol and not Durham will not mean anything to a second year law student who doesn't like tort or want to engage in further study/research around it.
Alright, thank you for your response.
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Crumpet1
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(Original post by Law-yer)
Do you think there is a notable difference between Durham and Bristol for Law, large enough for one to ignore other aspects of a university such as the location, cost and so on?
None whatsoever. Go to the one where you think you'll be happiest.
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Brutal Bee
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(Original post by Crumpet1)
None whatsoever. Go to the one where you think you'll be happiest.
What about Durham and Manchester?
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Crumpet1
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(Original post by Law-yer)
What about Durham and Manchester?
Law firms are recruiting you, not your university. They know there are differing reasons why people choose a university. Once you get into the top league of universities (by which I mean broadly the top 20-30), they are therefore recruiting the person, not the academics. It's about what you do with your university time, and whether they want to work with you, not where you attended university geographically.
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Brutal Bee
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(Original post by Crumpet1)
Law firms are recruiting you, not your university. They know there are differing reasons why people choose a university. Once you get into the top league of universities (by which I mean broadly the top 20-30), they are therefore recruiting the person, not the academics. It's about what you do with your university time, and whether they want to work with you, not where you attended university geographically.
That really helps. I have wanted to attend Manchester for a while now but the 'league tables and reputation and prestige' is something that school feeds you for years and so even though you are told by more experienced people that it is all nonsense, it's harder to leave the idea behind. Thank you for reaffirming, at least now I can pick a university without having to think too much about what doesn't matter.
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Crumpet1
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(Original post by Law-yer)
That really helps. I have wanted to attend Manchester for a while now but the 'league tables and reputation and prestige' is something that school feeds you for years and so even though you are told by more experienced people that it is all nonsense, it's harder to leave the idea behind. Thank you for reaffirming, at least now I can pick a university without having to think too much about what doesn't matter.
Manchester is a terrific university. Don't know if you're a swimmer but their swimming pool is one of the most gorgeous I've ever seen.

The senior partner at the office where I'm based has three children, two went to to Manchester, one is at Sheffield. They've all had a great time.
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