Law extra curricular

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r1.ayy
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#1
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#1
Does anyone know of any other extra curricular I could do that’s law related like any sort of events there doing for year 12’s or 13’s? Literally want to burst my CV as much as I can
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Mollyanne2003
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#2
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Anything debate ish, try get work experience in a local solicitors firm etc, sit in on court hearings that are open, even try and get work experience in the courts! Also leadership roles look good, public speaking etc. If your school doesn’t have a debate club try and set one up!
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giella
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Without knowing what you’ve already done it’s rather difficult to suggest something that you definitely don’t already have.

I would say, however, that additional investigations around the subject in terms of wider reading that can demonstrate your interest is sufficient in most cases is usually good enough for most universities. Bear in mind that a law degree is, first and foremost, an academic pursuit. It’s not a vocational degree. So almost anything works on a personal statement. The skills they want are the ability to work with others, confidence in communicating in both written and oral skills, ability to present information, interest in debating etc. These are all key skills for a law degree or any degree. Just enough that demonstrates that you could contribute something to the course for the three years you’re there.
I advised on a personal statement for law this year who had no directly related experience for law but who had done lots of work in her community as a volunteer, which spoke volumes about her character in terms of leadership and communication skills. In terms of work experience, she’d had none directly but she’d read quite a lot around law from a criminal perspective and also had an interest in contracts which she’d gained from helping her mum in her mum’s dance school business. I urged to put these first and she had four offers within six days of sending off her application. It’s just about playing to your strengths and making strengths out of your own character. You don’t have to augment yourself and certain things don’t necessarily “look good”. What you have and who you are are sufficient as long as you identify which aspects of your character are suited to the law course you are applying to.
Again, have you shown leadership in any capacity? Are you a decent communicator? What are your interests and how will a law degree nurture them? Do you have the requisite skills to cope with the subject? This is what they’re looking for. It’s not a competition, so to speak. Remember, they’re competing for you, not the other way around, in some ways at least.
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r1.ayy
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#4
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by Mollyanne2003)
Anything debate ish, try get work experience in a local solicitors firm etc, sit in on court hearings that are open, even try and get work experience in the courts! Also leadership roles look good, public speaking etc. If your school doesn’t have a debate club try and set one up!
Thank you very much, how do I find out which court proceedings I can sit in on? And I was thinking about starting a debate club, is there any advice you have for that? Any resources you know of and what sort of things get taught in a debate club?
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r1.ayy
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#5
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(Original post by giella)
Without knowing what you’ve already done it’s rather difficult to suggest something that you definitely don’t already have.

I would say, however, that additional investigations around the subject in terms of wider reading that can demonstrate your interest is sufficient in most cases is usually good enough for most universities. Bear in mind that a law degree is, first and foremost, an academic pursuit. It’s not a vocational degree. So almost anything works on a personal statement. The skills they want are the ability to work with others, confidence in communicating in both written and oral skills, ability to present information, interest in debating etc. These are all key skills for a law degree or any degree. Just enough that demonstrates that you could contribute something to the course for the three years you’re there.
I advised on a personal statement for law this year who had no directly related experience for law but who had done lots of work in her community as a volunteer, which spoke volumes about her character in terms of leadership and communication skills. In terms of work experience, she’d had none directly but she’d read quite a lot around law from a criminal perspective and also had an interest in contracts which she’d gained from helping her mum in her mum’s dance school business. I urged to put these first and she had four offers within six days of sending off her application. It’s just about playing to your strengths and making strengths out of your own character. You don’t have to augment yourself and certain things don’t necessarily “look good”. What you have and who you are are sufficient as long as you identify which aspects of your character are suited to the law course you are applying to.
Again, have you shown leadership in any capacity? Are you a decent communicator? What are your interests and how will a law degree nurture them? Do you have the requisite skills to cope with the subject? This is what they’re looking for. It’s not a competition, so to speak. Remember, they’re competing for you, not the other way around, in some ways at least.
Agreed, however without a shadow of a doubt there still are things that I could be doing to boost my chances in getting accepted into Oxbridge which is what I’m looking for, but thanks for your insight I appreciate it☺️
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giella
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#6
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(Original post by r1.ayy)
Agreed, however without a shadow of a doubt there still are things that I could be doing to boost my chances in getting accepted into Oxbridge which is what I’m looking for, but thanks for your insight I appreciate it☺️
Oxbridge both is and isn’t different from other law schools. People who go there tend to have done more but that’s not necessarily what oxbridge is looking for. People who get into oxford or Cambridge ultimately get it because they get AAA+ at A level, they write a personal statement that demonstrates their interest and they’re experienced as people of the world, and because they impress someone at interview, which is not a discussion of their experiences but an assessment of whether they can cope with the style of teaching on offer there.
People who’ve done a bit more might have those skills and qualities as a result of having done a bit more but the little bit more they’ve done isn’t actually what Oxford or Cambridge are looking for. It’s what they’ve learned from doing that little bit more.
Two examples. I tutored a girl once who was a carer for her mum and had been since she was thirteen years old. She was adamant that that wasn’t going on her personal statement because she didn’t want a pity offer. I said to her, let’s just talk about what you’ve gained from doing that then and we’ll try to talk about where else you’ve shown those qualities. It turned out there were quite a few things. Resilience, personal responsibility, emotional maturity, etc. But all in things that are fairly mundane: making sure that bills were paid, her little sister’s clothes were washed and laid out for her in the morning, that her mum had transport organised for appointments etc. She didn’t have a lot of time for other things. She ended up putting that on her personal statement in the end because it was key to her story. She applied to Cambridge, got an offer, and turned it down, sadly, as she knew she couldn’t take it up in the end. Went to her local university instead. But it was a genuine personal statement and had a lot of integrity and that’s why she got the offer.
Another student of mine has done constant work experience from the time he was sixteen, played two instruments, attended public speaking competitions...his personal statement read like a CV, with no context. I made him clear the lot of it out and start with what he’d learned from each experience. It turned out that a bunch of them had very little substance to them, that he’d only really done them for the experience. I made him focus on the things that he’d done where he’d shown genuine growth, like his part time job and his volunteering with the younger year groups in the school for which he’d received some training. We put the work experience in, but only really to demonstrate his interest and future goals, because that’s more what they amounted to. He got an offer from Cambridge to do law as well.
Actually, I’ll add a third example. I had a student whose school wouldn’t support her applying to Oxford because they said she didn’t have enough extra on her personal statement. Now she didn’t make the grades in the end, which was annoying because her third grade was in music and her practical went badly, but hers was a quiet personal statement (for English) that just demonstrated her passion and raw ability in her subject. She got an offer based on that and her performance at interview. Again, we made it a very honest and focused personal statement that acknowledged what she had to offer and what she hoped to gain. She met the minimum requirements and exceeded them where she needed to. It is sometimes enough.
It’s not the essence of what you put on a personal statement but the substance. They’re not looking for specific things, necessarily, but about what you can learn from them. If you want to do them, great, but do them because you’re genuinely interested, not because it looks good. Believe me, I’ve seen so many personal statements for law where the people writing them thought they were the first person who’d ever considered watching a criminal hearing from a public gallery. It’s not that impressive and there’s not much that you can learn from an observational role like that that deserves to end up in a personal statement. The equivalent would be saying that you went and sat in A&E for five hours on a Saturday night in preparation for applying to medicine.
They’re looking for evidence of skills and qualities and they care less about where and how you got them than what you got. They care that you’re able to have a life as well because that proves that you’re going to cope with university life and maybe contribute something to the community while you’re there, but again, they’re not necessarily expecting to see anything amazing.
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