Chumter
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I’m in year 10 doing . All compulsory subjects : maths English combined science Spanish and geog or history and I chose DT and Sociology as my additional subjects

I want to do
Maths AS level , physics , Chem ,Bio and computer science

Is this too much and would I even be able to do computer science as I didn’t take it at GCSE ?

Could any one tell me the difference between AS level and A - level . I’m lost
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mnot
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(Original post by Chumter)
I’m in year 10 doing . All compulsory subjects : maths English combined science Spanish and geog or history and I chose DT and Sociology as my additional subjects

I want to do
Maths AS level , physics , Chem ,Bio and computer science

Is this too much and would I even be able to do computer science as I didn’t take it at GCSE ?

Could any one tell me the difference between AS level and A - level . I’m lost
So AS level is half an A-level its essentially only the year 12 content, worth half the UCAS points...

Can you study A-level CompSci, without having the GCSE? yes!

Most importantly what do you want to do post A-level? a degree? if so what subject.

If you want to study at uni: Physcis, Chem, CompSci, Engineering then I strongly suggest you do full A-level maths (potentially consider Further Maths) and shrink the Biology to an AS instead.
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5hyl33n
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Yes. It is too much. Most universities only look for three A-Levels. Four at most, but even that is not recommended.

Coming from someone who takes Chemistry, Physics and Psychology, I am struggling to balance the three subjects.

AS is only taken for a year. You only learn half the content and is “easier” than A-Level.

AS is worth less in terms of UCAS points and it depends on the grade you achieve.
AS is recommended if you want to take four subjects but only carry on with it for a year, so you have more time for the others.
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5hyl33n
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Also, to add on, you have to ask your 6th Form whether they will allow you to take Computer Science for A-Levels without the GCSE because it does build upon GCSE knowledge as I’ve heard from my friends. Also, I would recommend getting a 6/7 in Math, because some need a certain grade in Math to take A-Level Computer Science.
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Chumter
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I was thinking about engineering but I’ve heard negative things about it that they work in cubicles and they are on computers 24/7 . I expected a more hands on job . So I want to choose broad subject so I can see other jobs I can get .
Would I need to self teach computer science ?
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5hyl33n
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(Original post by Chumter)
I was thinking about engineering but I’ve heard negative things about it that they work in cubicles and they are on computers 24/7 . I expected a more hands on job . So I want to choose broad subject so I can see other jobs I can get .
Would I need to self teach computer science ?
I would say take Maths, Physics and Computer Science? Also, take Further Maths as a fourth option so you can drop it if you like or take it as an AS.

Those subjects will open you up to a:
- Math degree
- Physics degree
- Computer Science degree

Those listed above are just common degrees but there are really so many options. Also, you are in year 10, so no need to stress too much. You still have plenty of time to figure it out.
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mnot
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(Original post by Chumter)
I was thinking about engineering but I’ve heard negative things about it that they work in cubicles and they are on computers 24/7 . I expected a more hands on job . So I want to choose broad subject so I can see other jobs I can get .
Would I need to self teach computer science ?
Different types of engineers, some work in testing some professional some in a mix.

Im an engineer working in research. I spend 2/3 of my time at a desk and 1/3 at tests, and have technicians to help setup and operate equipment. This is personally i really good combo where im not spending 40 hours a week straight staring at a screen but a nice balance.

There are engineers who work full-time at a desk tho it depends what you want career wise. But I would say most other professional jobs are likely to be fairly heavy desk/office based. Its more important to find an office culture you like.

If you want to do engineering you'll need a full maths & physics A-level (AS maths wont be enough). (and id recommend further maths as well).
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Chumter
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My mom also wants me to take Chem or Bio . ?
As my she wants me to be like my cousin who wants to be a surgeon and he chose bio chem , maths .

Hopefully I can convince her .
Which type of engineer would you recommend that’s has the most hands on time ? I just don’t want to have a mostly desk job and then there was a time where I wanted to be a forensic scientist but I don’t think they have a high employment rate
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mnot
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(Original post by Chumter)
My mom also wants me to take Chem or Bio . ?
As my she wants me to be like my cousin who wants to be a surgeon and he chose bio chem , maths .

Hopefully I can convince her .
Which type of engineer would you recommend that’s has the most hands on time ? I just don’t want to have a mostly desk job and then there was a time where I wanted to be a forensic scientist but I don’t think they have a high employment rate
Well If yo want to be a surgeon ie the medical path: you need biology & chemistry really.

For engineering: Maths, Physics then either Further maths or Chemistry.

Its not really a case of what type of engineering as there are office jobs and practical jobs in chemical, mechanical, aerospace, manufacturing... mechanical is quite a good general one. But its about picking the type of role you'll do full time, testing or quality engineers tend to be more active roles ie less desk based,

I suspect forensic science is all desk work as well nowadays, yes im sure there is practical work involved but that will mostly be handled by technicians.
(being a technician is a potential route you could look at for a very practical job, but it makes more sense to go down the apprentice route for this and it is lower pay...).
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Chumter
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Oh ok

Thanks for your help
I’ll just see what I’ll do when I reach year 11
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