Am I crazy to quit full-time work to go to University?

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_xChlox_
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There is not point of living a miserable life everyday for the rest of your life is there? Take a risk! Go for your passion, what enjoyment would u get from life working the same job you feel anxious in every single day? That’s gotta be physically and mentally draining. It doesn’t matter if u start a career later on in life because everyone’s life is a different path. It’s okay to change your life plan.

I really really hope you follow your passion, you only get to live your life once so it needs to be on your own terms and doing what makes you happy. If you’re passionate about Psychology. GO FOR IT! It may take a few years but 10 years from now do u wanna look back at yourself working what if u had done it or look back and be glad that you took a risk and went after something you enjoyed? I know which one I would want. If u don’t do it you’re constantly gonna to be living in the “What if”

It’s your life, don’t waste your only shot.
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by sroscoe)
Hi,

I’m turning to TSR for some advice as my head is absolutely scrambled from overthinking... I’m 25 and work full-time in Buying for a large retail company... My job is perceived as “good” and people often seem impressed when I tell them what I do for a living, however, I really don’t enjoy it very much. I don’t hate it BUT I do feel incredibly anxious when I’m at work, as I’m constantly trying to make myself fit into something that isn’t really me, like a square peg in a round hole. The job doesn’t play to my strengths and, therefore, I am very average at it. I don’t get any fulfilment from
Buying and also have very little interest in it... There is the opportunity to move around the company, however, for example, marketing or product development, but I’m not really interested in those things either, but maybe it would be better. The positives of my job is that is pays well, there’s the opportunity to move around etc. it is a perceived good job (not sure whether that’s a positive or not). The negatives are that I feel very anxious whilst I am there, I am developing quite bad social anxiety as I’m constantly comparing myself to other people in an environment that isn’t really suited me around people that aren’t really my kind of people... maybe I’m just not suited to corporate life, I get very bad performance anxiety because I know I’m not really good at the job and am constantly worrying about what others think of me. So, what do I enjoy? I am absolutely passionate about Psychology. I never went to college/uni as I suffered a major depressive episode when I was younger which kinda screwed with my post high school education so I went straight into work but I’ve always felt disappointed that I didn’t go to university and pursue me passion. Every year for the past 4 years I have toyed with the idea of going to uni and well 10 months ago I decided that it’s something I need to pursue as I will always regret it if I don’t. So... I embarked on an Access course, I have been studying Access to HE in Biology and Psychology for the past 8 months which I am due to finish in June, I do it alongside working full time. I have got conditional offers from uni and the course is going well. However, I am having a major wobble wondering whether I’m doing the right thing or not, leaving a “good” job with a good salary to go to university with no guarantee of a job at the end of it at age 25, I will be 28 before I’ve graduated and will probably have to go into post grad study, I may be 30+ before I start my new career. I’m having the age old money vs passion argument. I’m so lost with what to do, my earning potential where I’m at not is very high but I’m just not happy :/.

What do you guys think? Sorry for the essay here. Hope you can give me some advice. Do I stay in a stable career with high earning potential but feeling unfulfilled or do I risk it all and go and pursue what I love?

Thanks everyone
Steph
What are your plans with a Psychology degree? Its a vastly over-subscribed subject with very many more graduates than psychology-specific roles. Doing the degree simply to get a degree in something you enjoy and then getting an 'any degree' role is realistic, getting into a professional psychology role, much less so. Is that what you want and are planning for?

You aren't likely to stay in an unfulfilling job for many more years, regardless of pay. So the comparison is will you be better off moving from where you are now in this job, into a more fulfilling role in 2-3 years, or into a graduate role, with this role and a psychology degree behind you in 3-4 years?

It's not clear from what you've said, that you will be in any better position professionally by taking the degree. You could just move in the same sector to something other than buying or to a different sector using your buying skills and that might get you out of the corporate environment you are uncomfortable in (which very many people are, no problem with that).

On the other hand, if you've forgotten to mention you've volunteered in a special needs nursery for the last 10 years and you want to work in that sector, with determination it could happen after the degree and relevant training/qualifications. You've still got 35+ years of career left.
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kayam23
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I'd say go for it.

I tried with sixth form after school but I didn't take to it so I got a job in the leisure industry at 18 and worked there for almost a decade, working my way up from entry level to duty manager. But then the club I was working at closed and I was made redundant so I decided to go back to education. First I did a BTEC in forensic science when I was 25 then I did the science access course when I was 28 and then moved 200 miles away from friends family the only place I'd ever known, to study biomedical science at uni.

Quite honestly, it wasn't easy not by a long shot. There were several bumps in the road and quite a major one right at the last hurdle but I just kept going with that end goal in mind of a career that I'd actual enjoy rather than just something to pay the bills.

I graduated with a first last year at age 33 and now at 34 I'm still building towards my ultimate goal, it's a fluid path, it doesn't happen the minute you get that degree but I'll tell you something for free, all of the twists and turns and unexpected obstacles all just add to the adventure, the excitement, the story you can tell your grandkids. And they give you so much insight, experience, resilience....and wisdom.

Also, studying at an older age means you really know what it's worth, you understand what the stakes are and that you're doing this for a reason and not just because it's the thing you're expected to do after school/college.

After all that, I can tell you that even with all of the ups and downs I've had during the whole period I think it was the best decision about my life that I've ever made so far and I don't regret a single second of it. I look at my friend who still works for the leisure company and she is STRESSED!! Worn out working most nights and weekends, never sees her kids and I just think man am I glad to be out of that!

And don't forget, no decision is permanent so if you try it and decide it's not for you, you just try something else instead. At least you will know one way or the other rather than spending a lifetime wondering.

Good luck with whatever you decide
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Kyxng
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(Original post by sroscoe)
Hi,

I’m turning to TSR for some advice as my head is absolutely scrambled from overthinking... I’m 25 and work full-time in Buying for a large retail company... My job is perceived as “good” and people often seem impressed when I tell them what I do for a living, however, I really don’t enjoy it very much. I don’t hate it BUT I do feel incredibly anxious when I’m at work, as I’m constantly trying to make myself fit into something that isn’t really me, like a square peg in a round hole. The job doesn’t play to my strengths and, therefore, I am very average at it. I don’t get any fulfilment from
Buying and also have very little interest in it... There is the opportunity to move around the company, however, for example, marketing or product development, but I’m not really interested in those things either, but maybe it would be better. The positives of my job is that is pays well, there’s the opportunity to move around etc. and move up the ladder, it is perceived a good career (not sure whether that’s a positive or not). The negatives are that I feel very anxious whilst I am there, I am developing quite bad social anxiety as I’m constantly comparing myself to other people in an environment that isn’t really suited me around people that aren’t really my kind of people... maybe I’m just not suited to corporate life, I get very bad performance anxiety because I know I’m not really suited to the job so I’m constantly trying to make myself fit in and am constantly worrying about what others think of me. So, what do I enjoy? I am absolutely passionate about Psychology. I never went to college/uni as I suffered a major depressive episode when I was younger which screwed with my post high school education so I went straight into work. I’ve always felt disappointed that I didn’t go to university and pursue me passion. Every year for the past 4 years I have toyed with the idea of going to uni and well finally 10 months ago I decided that it’s something I need to pursue as its constantly on my mind. So... I embarked on an Access course, I have been studying an Access to HE in Biology and Psychology for the past 8 months which I am due to finish in June, I do it alongside working full time. I have got conditional offers from uni and the course is going well. However, I am having a major wobble wondering whether I’m doing the right thing or not, leaving a “good” job with a good salary to go to university with no guarantee of a job at the end of it at age 25, I will be 28 before I’ve graduated and will probably have to go into post grad study, I may be 30 before I start my career. I’m having the age old money vs passion argument, do I stay in a stable career with high earning potential but feeling unfulfilled or do I risk it all and go and pursue what I love? I’m so lost with what to do, my earning potential where I’m at is very high but I’m just not very happy.

What do you guys think? Sorry for the essay here. Hope you can give me some advice

Thanks everyone
Steph
Could you not do Open Uni? You can continue working whilst learning..
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Weeping_Angel
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(Original post by sroscoe)
Hi,

I’m turning to TSR for some advice as my head is absolutely scrambled from overthinking... I’m 25 and work full-time in Buying for a large retail company... My job is perceived as “good” and people often seem impressed when I tell them what I do for a living, however, I really don’t enjoy it very much. I don’t hate it BUT I do feel incredibly anxious when I’m at work, as I’m constantly trying to make myself fit into something that isn’t really me, like a square peg in a round hole. The job doesn’t play to my strengths and, therefore, I am very average at it. I don’t get any fulfilment from
Buying and also have very little interest in it... There is the opportunity to move around the company, however, for example, marketing or product development, but I’m not really interested in those things either, but maybe it would be better. The positives of my job is that is pays well, there’s the opportunity to move around etc. and move up the ladder, it is perceived a good career (not sure whether that’s a positive or not). The negatives are that I feel very anxious whilst I am there, I am developing quite bad social anxiety as I’m constantly comparing myself to other people in an environment that isn’t really suited me around people that aren’t really my kind of people... maybe I’m just not suited to corporate life, I get very bad performance anxiety because I know I’m not really suited to the job so I’m constantly trying to make myself fit in and am constantly worrying about what others think of me. So, what do I enjoy? I am absolutely passionate about Psychology. I never went to college/uni as I suffered a major depressive episode when I was younger which screwed with my post high school education so I went straight into work. I’ve always felt disappointed that I didn’t go to university and pursue me passion. Every year for the past 4 years I have toyed with the idea of going to uni and well finally 10 months ago I decided that it’s something I need to pursue as its constantly on my mind. So... I embarked on an Access course, I have been studying an Access to HE in Biology and Psychology for the past 8 months which I am due to finish in June, I do it alongside working full time. I have got conditional offers from uni and the course is going well. However, I am having a major wobble wondering whether I’m doing the right thing or not, leaving a “good” job with a good salary to go to university with no guarantee of a job at the end of it at age 25, I will be 28 before I’ve graduated and will probably have to go into post grad study, I may be 30 before I start my career. I’m having the age old money vs passion argument, do I stay in a stable career with high earning potential but feeling unfulfilled or do I risk it all and go and pursue what I love? I’m so lost with what to do, my earning potential where I’m at is very high but I’m just not very happy.

What do you guys think? Sorry for the essay here. Hope you can give me some advice

Thanks everyone
Steph
If you're "absolutely passionate about psychology" as you put it, then quit your job and go do a psychology degree. Life is too short. If you don't do it you will be 30 and regretting that you didn't go vs being 30 and on the cusp of starting a new career. Psychology pays a lot in the long run - especially if you are ambitious and start your own practice once you have clocked enough experience.

Being interested in psychology you should know that the reason you are having a major wobble is because your mind is currently in its comfort zone and you are about to drag it out of it by doing something different.

I am in a similar position to you - although I did a law degree, didn't get a TC so have been working in corporate sales the last few years. I don't enjoy it either. I have been taking internationally recognised IT qualifications to get on a Masters course in Cybersecurity. I will start in September and all going well I will be 31 when I graduate. And I'll probably be broke after fees living expenses and accommodation. But I don't care. I won't live an unfulfilled life.

Don't get to 40 and be unfulfilled. Do what you love.
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ajj2000
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(Original post by Weeping_Angel)
Psychology pays a lot in the long run - especially if you are ambitious and start your own practice once you have clocked enough experience.
This is the problem. Psychology pays well (not really a lot considering the ability and efforts of the relatively few who make it) but its very difficult to get the experience to get onto the career path. Loads of very bright and dedicated people don't get there - I understand a notable majority - and have sunk a lot of low / no paid time into chasing opportunities.

marinade may be able to be more specific about the probabilities.

OP - I think if you are happy with the financial side of life its a perfectly good idea going to university. Jobs for life don't really exist in business any more and you could well find a more satisfying path in your current sector re-entering having done a degree. Have you considered whether you could reduce your hours and study with the OU?
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marinade
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(Original post by ajj2000)
This is the problem. Psychology pays well (not really a lot considering the ability and efforts of the relatively few who make it) but its very difficult to get the experience to get onto the career path. Loads of very bright and dedicated people don't get there - I understand a notable majority - and have sunk a lot of low / no paid time into chasing opportunities.

marinade may be able to be more specific about the probabilities.
Thanks. OP sroscoe has been deleted, but I can read it due to it being quoted.

There are three aspects to this post all of which I know a bit about and only one is Psychology. I would argue the psychology aspect is the 2nd or 3rd most important, although OP may not think so.

1. Is mental health. It's not the mental health section so I won't go in great detail. I think the OP needs to go and see the GP and start a process of catching the social anxiety (or if it is something else like GAD) so it doesn't get wildly out of control. This is a ted talk which although in a different job may be applicable https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S8FNcOBkhN4&t=366s

2. Buying is a good job. There are substantial opportunities elsewhere. Many others wait a long time after graduating to get such jobs. I think the mental health aspect is clouding the thinking on this. I'm not saying stay in the same job or company, just that that will make it difficult moving/deciding. There is a way of marketing what you've done and skills and flexing it to move into something else. The sort of job you are in people do sabbaticals and placements elsewhere in the company, would this be an option?

3. There are around 40,000 Psychology graduates a year, 10,000+ with MScs. Roughly a quarter of Psychology peeps go on to get a postgraduate master's degree. The field is dominated by those that want to do clinical psychology, forensic psychology and educational psychology (there are of course other things you can do). Ball park there are around 600 clinical doctorate places per year. 200 educational.

The job that people are most likely to get on graduating with a Psychology degree is a support worker. Other common ones depending on what they are aiming for ultimately are teaching assistant, admin at council/NHS vaguely related, low level HR jobs, low level marketing jobs or various roles at charities (often admin or marketing or some mush of various things). There tends to be a magnet to mental healthy or similar charities and these can be pretty competitive to land (there's no money). Others graduates may be baristas, health care assistants, care assistants, retail, hospitality and particularly restaurants. HR did used to be a large area for jobs, but as you work in retail high up you'll be aware how much this has been cut the last five years. Marketing is not necessarily streets of gold either.

Mid-level jobs particularly applicable for the clinical route are Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner (PWP) and Assistant Psychologist (AP). Due to the pay people tend to perceive these as entry jobs for graduates and get frustrated (to put it very mildly) how competitive they are. PWP is not a job that people generally stay in a long time, people moved on after a year or two often (for various reasons). Similarly AP is a varied job but can have some of the same issues around support work so people can jump around from post to post trying to clock up different experience for doctorate application. It's easier to get this roles than people generally think if focused on particular things. One caveat is mobility, the AP roles in particular can be spread out and people just don't seem that mobile. All of these things require the ability to perform well in interviews, get appropriate advice and highly focused experience.

A passing comment that I hope won't get me into too much trouble, but generally speaking of Psychology grads I've met, a lot really enjoyed A-level/access course and not so much the degree. The degree has stats on which terrifies most (it shouldn't) and has research methods and little 'practical' stuff about the human mind/mental health. Things like sleep, tiny slivers of clinical and big broad modules or bits on abnormal psychology were enjoyed. There are people who prefer the research stuff (some on here). There is a bit of a mismatch/tension between what people expect and what they get. One of the additional problems from a jobs point of view is the drumming in on courses about research methods and 'analytical' skills. It tends to mean due to the shortage of jobs elsewhere that people go for these and there's more frustration as people say things like 'I have excellent research skills, but there aren't the jobs out there'. Odd people get a plum job as a research assistant, but is it fulfilling was a word used earlier - that's potentially applicable here also.

The age aspect, I wouldn't worry about that. Getting a degree at 28, no problem. It's more how people see it inside their own heads.

If you already had a degree and was doing a psychology conversion, at your age, or later, those people generally do all right, some infact very well. I know of more people directly and indirectly who got onto clinical doctorates through conversion courses than the standard route. Those that didn't all do other things. We're all different but doing a degree with a mental health condition is absolutely doable, but difficult. A psychology course with 250 coursemates, packed lecture theatres, unis with tens of thousands of students/staff coping strategies do have to be worked out. So many on this forum write about loneliness at university.
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Other_Owl
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If your planning to study a degree with a high or guaranteed employment rate along with having enough money to fund yourself or use shares to fund yourself. I was told by my dad. People who use shares to fund themselves at university have at least 30k in savings.
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username5013608
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(Original post by _xChlox_)
There is not point of living a miserable life everyday for the rest of your life is there? Take a risk! Go for your passion, what enjoyment would u get from life working the same job you feel anxious in every single day? That’s gotta be physically and mentally draining. It doesn’t matter if u start a career later on in life because everyone’s life is a different path. It’s okay to change your life plan.

I really really hope you follow your passion, you only get to live your life once so it needs to be on your own terms and doing what makes you happy. If you’re passionate about Psychology. GO FOR IT! It may take a few years but 10 years from now do u wanna look back at yourself working what if u had done it or look back and be glad that you took a risk and went after something you enjoyed? I know which one I would want. If u don’t do it you’re constantly gonna to be living in the “What if”

It’s your life, don’t waste your only shot.
Hey, thanks for your reply! This is what I feel in my heart, that I should follow my passion, only then I get all caught up in the financial impact and that I need to get into the real world. Although I’m not sure any amount of money is worth being miserable. The worst thing is comparing myself to others my age and feeling down about this... When I tell people I’m studying to go to uni they look at me as if I’m crazy which doesn’t help. I guess I could stick where I am and work on my anxieties and stuff to see whether that would help but if my current environment is feeding the anxiety is going to be incredibly. Eurgh, I don’t know... I seem to be changing my mind by the minute at the moment. Thanks again for your response x
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(Original post by Other_Owl)
If your planning to study a degree with a high or guaranteed employment rate along with having enough money to fund yourself or use shares to fund yourself. I was told by my dad. People who use shares to fund themselves at university have at least 30k in savings.
Hey! Unfortunately I don’t have any funds and would be relying on government loans :/
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username5013608
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(Original post by marinade)
Thanks. OP sroscoe has been deleted, but I can read it due to it being quoted.

There are three aspects to this post all of which I know a bit about and only one is Psychology. I would argue the psychology aspect is the 2nd or 3rd most important, although OP may not think so.

1. Is mental health. It's not the mental health section so I won't go in great detail. I think the OP needs to go and see the GP and start a process of catching the social anxiety (or if it is something else like GAD) so it doesn't get wildly out of control. This is a ted talk which although in a different job may be applicable https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S8FNcOBkhN4&t=366s

2. Buying is a good job. There are substantial opportunities elsewhere. Many others wait a long time after graduating to get such jobs. I think the mental health aspect is clouding the thinking on this. I'm not saying stay in the same job or company, just that that will make it difficult moving/deciding. There is a way of marketing what you've done and skills and flexing it to move into something else. The sort of job you are in people do sabbaticals and placements elsewhere in the company, would this be an option?

3. There are around 40,000 Psychology graduates a year, 10,000+ with MScs. Roughly a quarter of Psychology peeps go on to get a postgraduate master's degree. The field is dominated by those that want to do clinical psychology, forensic psychology and educational psychology (there are of course other things you can do). Ball park there are around 600 clinical doctorate places per year. 200 educational.

The job that people are most likely to get on graduating with a Psychology degree is a support worker. Other common ones depending on what they are aiming for ultimately are teaching assistant, admin at council/NHS vaguely related, low level HR jobs, low level marketing jobs or various roles at charities (often admin or marketing or some mush of various things). There tends to be a magnet to mental healthy or similar charities and these can be pretty competitive to land (there's no money). Others graduates may be baristas, health care assistants, care assistants, retail, hospitality and particularly restaurants. HR did used to be a large area for jobs, but as you work in retail high up you'll be aware how much this has been cut the last five years. Marketing is not necessarily streets of gold either.

Mid-level jobs particularly applicable for the clinical route are Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner (PWP) and Assistant Psychologist (AP). Due to the pay people tend to perceive these as entry jobs for graduates and get frustrated (to put it very mildly) how competitive they are. PWP is not a job that people generally stay in a long time, people moved on after a year or two often (for various reasons). Similarly AP is a varied job but can have some of the same issues around support work so people can jump around from post to post trying to clock up different experience for doctorate application. It's easier to get this roles than people generally think if focused on particular things. One caveat is mobility, the AP roles in particular can be spread out and people just don't seem that mobile. All of these things require the ability to perform well in interviews, get appropriate advice and highly focused experience.

A passing comment that I hope won't get me into too much trouble, but generally speaking of Psychology grads I've met, a lot really enjoyed A-level/access course and not so much the degree. The degree has stats on which terrifies most (it shouldn't) and has research methods and little 'practical' stuff about the human mind/mental health. Things like sleep, tiny slivers of clinical and big broad modules or bits on abnormal psychology were enjoyed. There are people who prefer the research stuff (some on here). There is a bit of a mismatch/tension between what people expect and what they get. One of the additional problems from a jobs point of view is the drumming in on courses about research methods and 'analytical' skills. It tends to mean due to the shortage of jobs elsewhere that people go for these and there's more frustration as people say things like 'I have excellent research skills, but there aren't the jobs out there'. Odd people get a plum job as a research assistant, but is it fulfilling was a word used earlier - that's potentially applicable here also.

The age aspect, I wouldn't worry about that. Getting a degree at 28, no problem. It's more how people see it inside their own heads.

If you already had a degree and was doing a psychology conversion, at your age, or later, those people generally do all right, some infact very well. I know of more people directly and indirectly who got onto clinical doctorates through conversion courses than the standard route. Those that didn't all do other things. We're all different but doing a degree with a mental health condition is absolutely doable, but difficult. A psychology course with 250 coursemates, packed lecture theatres, unis with tens of thousands of students/staff coping strategies do have to be worked out. So many on this forum write about loneliness at university.
Hey there! Thanks so much for your extensive and informative reply, it’s very interesting to see your perspective...

1. Yes my biggest stumbling block in life really at the moment and the thing that’s making me feel so down and in a rut is my mental health. It’s certainly not in a good place at the moment as the social anxiety has developed beyond my control. I work in an environment where you’re constantly judged and expected to deliver in a very fast paced, high pressure environment. I have the type of personality that self doubts, lacks confidence and dwells/worries a lot so I’m not sure the environment I am in isn’t going to be helping at all with me overcoming my anxieties, surely it’s likely to be making it worse? It certainly feels the worst when I’m at work anyway. I’ve been to my GP and am taking Sertraline and propranolol to help me with it, I’m 5 weeks in and feel about 10% better, good days and bad days. I need counselling really alongside it, I am likely going to invest in a private counsellor and hopefully do some CBT or something.

2. Yes, it is a good job and the fact that many people would love to be in my position is what makes me think that I shouldn’t leave and should make the most of it. But it’s hard because I do feel like I’m trying to force myself to fit into an environment which just isn’t me. I can see why some people would enjoy it but when I suffer so much with low confidence etc every day is a battle in that kind of job as I’m around very (at least externally) confident and self assured people who will tread on you if necessary, I’m just not that way inclined. I could move around but I’m really not driven to do that as there’s nothing that really interests me that I could move into with my experience, I’d end up in another similar corporate role whixh doesn’t fulfill me much, although I agree it could potentially be an improvement, I’m not sure I’m willing to put myself out there for something I’m not really keen on doing, especially when my self esteem isn’t in a great place. I have to really feel something in order to do well at it.

3. Yeah I know it’s highly competitive and many people don’t get a job in Psychology, I’ve done my research on that front and am not blind to the risks. However, I always figure I could, with my experience, quite easily find another similar corporate job at the end of my degree if psychology doesn’t work out for me BUT would have worked on myself in a safer environment at uni for 3 years, developed myself and potentially have a new lease of life after studying and be peaceful about it knowing that I at least tried to pursue my passion and not live in regret about not having done so. Also, studying could build my self-confidence and leave me in a position to enter back into the job market with a new state of mind and increased confidence... What do you think about this?

I definitely want to be on good money when I am older, I don’t want to struggle etc. financially so potentially I will end up back in the corporate world in future... If I’ve done uni and worked on myself / learnt a whole load of Psychology, maybe it would make my life easier when I am older, easier to climb the ladder to success as I’ve spent those years really working on myself and developing.

Loneliness is always a risk with uni but I am keen to develop my confidence and social skills so would be constantly looking of ways to push myself out of my comfort zone and meet people, plus I won’t be moving far away so always haven’t friends around anyway.

I should add that I had a meeting with my manager today and he discussed a development plan and ways to work on my confidence... This has screwed with my head even more as with the right support maybe I will overcome my anxieties etc but I really can’t be sure and you never really know that your manager will help with this. It’s a risk to stay in the hope things will get better.

Thanks again for your reply!
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(Original post by ajj2000)
This is the problem. Psychology pays well (not really a lot considering the ability and efforts of the relatively few who make it) but its very difficult to get the experience to get onto the career path. Loads of very bright and dedicated people don't get there - I understand a notable majority - and have sunk a lot of low / no paid time into chasing opportunities.

marinade may be able to be more specific about the probabilities.

OP - I think if you are happy with the financial side of life its a perfectly good idea going to university. Jobs for life don't really exist in business any more and you could well find a more satisfying path in your current sector re-entering having done a degree. Have you considered whether you could reduce your hours and study with the OU?
Hello, thanks for your response!

I’m not completely closed off to the possibility of going back into private sector tbh (corporate world) after the degree, I think if I couldn’t find a job that would satisfy me financially I would potentially turn back to the corporate world. I think for me if a career in Psychology doesn’t work out then at least I always have the degree under my belt and those years spent at uni could really pay off long term in terms of my personal development and time spent away from full time work, working on myself. It’s not a waste is what I am trying to say, I think with a subject like psychology I could get a lot of self-development in the process regardless of job at the end? Which would, in turn, aid me in whatever job I decide to go into. The anxiety is a massive thing for me at the moment and makes me want to have some time away from a competitive environment to work on myself and do a bit of soul searching.

You’re so right about jobs not being certain anymore! I keep telling myself to think longer term as literally things could change in a minute, I’m purely thinking short term at the moment . Surely it would always be safer to have a degree than to not have a degree? What do you think?

I think with student loans and a part time job I shouldn’t be in too bad of a position financially, I won’t hqve as much disposable as I do now but maybe I’ll be less bothered about material things as I’ll feel more fulfilled.

Thanks again!
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username5013608
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(Original post by Kyxng)
Could you not do Open Uni? You can continue working whilst learning..
Hey there! I know many people do choose to do that but given the state of my mental health at the moment/anxieties, I really don’t think that’s a good option for me. If I’m going to study I want my focus to be 100% on that. I am doing college atm whilst working full-time and it’s 100% having a detrimental effect on my mental health as I am constantly stressed, it’s none stop, whenever I’m not working I’m studying and vice versa, it’s a bit too much to handle. I think if I was to study whilst remaining in my current work I would burn our very quickly and would not produce my best work at university.

I can see why people do it I just don’t think it’s right for me personally.

Thanks again
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username5013608
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(Original post by Weeping_Angel)
If you're "absolutely passionate about psychology" as you put it, then quit your job and go do a psychology degree. Life is too short. If you don't do it you will be 30 and regretting that you didn't go vs being 30 and on the cusp of starting a new career. Psychology pays a lot in the long run - especially if you are ambitious and start your own practice once you have clocked enough experience.

Being interested in psychology you should know that the reason you are having a major wobble is because your mind is currently in its comfort zone and you are about to drag it out of it by doing something different.

I am in a similar position to you - although I did a law degree, didn't get a TC so have been working in corporate sales the last few years. I don't enjoy it either. I have been taking internationally recognised IT qualifications to get on a Masters course in Cybersecurity. I will start in September and all going well I will be 31 when I graduate. And I'll probably be broke after fees living expenses and accommodation. But I don't care. I won't live an unfulfilled life.

Don't get to 40 and be unfulfilled. Do what you love.
Hey there! Thanks for the reply

You make it sound so easy haha! Would giving up a good salary and potential for very good salary in the future not put you off at all? I want to have all the nice things, get into the property ladder etc... would putting a hold on this not bother you? Maybe I get too caught up on the money part but it does make the world go round afterall :/.

You’re 10000% right, every fibre of my being is screaming at me to stay within my comfort zone, stick with what I know. Change and risk is unbelievably scary, we’re just not built for it, especially somebody like me who is a massive worrier! I just worry that I’ll be behind everyone else, struggling for money at 28/early 30s, that scares me a lot.

The road to actually become a Psychologist in 8 years and I’m not quite sure I have that amount of studying in me, that would be the dream but I’m trying to remain realistic. I could very potentially end up back in a corporate job but I suppose I would be equipped with all the new knowledge and life skills gained from uni which would very likely change my view on things.

Fair play to you going to study your masters, massive respect there, you haven’t settled for average and are going for more, fair play to you and good luck with it all, I wish you the very best with your studies. I imagine learning about cyber security will be very interesting also! What do you plan on doing for work whilst you’re studying from September? Do you have any savings? I don’t have any currently which again puts me of off going uni as I worry how I will survive.
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(Original post by sroscoe)
Hello, thanks for your response!

I’m not completely closed off to the possibility of going back into private sector tbh (corporate world) after the degree, I think if I couldn’t find a job that would satisfy me financially I would potentially turn back to the corporate world. I think for me if a career in Psychology doesn’t work out then at least I always have the degree under my belt and those years spent at uni could really pay off long term in terms of my personal development and time spent away from full time work, working on myself. It’s not a waste is what I am trying to say, I think with a subject like psychology I could get a lot of self-development in the process regardless of job at the end? Which would, in turn, aid me in whatever job I decide to go into. The anxiety is a massive thing for me at the moment and makes me want to have some time away from a competitive environment to work on myself and do a bit of soul searching.

You’re so right about jobs not being certain anymore! I keep telling myself to think longer term as literally things could change in a minute, I’m purely thinking short term at the moment . Surely it would always be safer to have a degree than to not have a degree? What do you think?

I think with student loans and a part time job I shouldn’t be in too bad of a position financially, I won’t hqve as much disposable as I do now but maybe I’ll be less bothered about material things as I’ll feel more fulfilled.

Thanks again!
I always have the degree under my belt and those years spent at uni could really pay off long term in terms of my personal development and time spent away from full time work, working on myself.

Very true. If you fancy doing the degree it won't put you backwards and could give some real skills and development

Surely it would always be safer to have a degree than to not have a degree? What do you think?

Yes - its safer and has upside with no downside (other than the loss of earnings if that is an issue). I think degrees are hugely overrated but its clear they can be of value.

I think with student loans and a part time job I shouldn’t be in too bad of a position financially, I won’t hqve as much disposable as I do now but maybe I’ll be less bothered about material things as I’ll feel more fulfilled.

Just draw up a budget and see how life looks. Are you happy to live cheaply? No foreign holidays with friends? No car? No expensive weddings. I would be in your position as would loads of others. You may feel differently and thats fine too. Where would you chose to study? Somewhere near to home or take the opportunity to go somewhere new, and ideally with a low cost of living?
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I jibbed off full time work in part to go do a degree. I didn't have a cushy number like you, though, and my job was hard, nasty, and crap
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Weeping_Angel
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(Original post by sroscoe)
Hey there! Thanks for the reply

You make it sound so easy haha! Would giving up a good salary and potential for very good salary in the future not put you off at all? I want to have all the nice things, get into the property ladder etc... would putting a hold on this not bother you? Maybe I get too caught up on the money part but it does make the world go round afterall :/.

You’re 10000% right, every fibre of my being is screaming at me to stay within my comfort zone, stick with what I know. Change and risk is unbelievably scary, we’re just not built for it, especially somebody like me who is a massive worrier! I just worry that I’ll be behind everyone else, struggling for money at 28/early 30s, that scares me a lot.

The road to actually become a Psychologist in 8 years and I’m not quite sure I have that amount of studying in me, that would be the dream but I’m trying to remain realistic. I could very potentially end up back in a corporate job but I suppose I would be equipped with all the new knowledge and life skills gained from uni which would very likely change my view on things.

Fair play to you going to study your masters, massive respect there, you haven’t settled for average and are going for more, fair play to you and good luck with it all, I wish you the very best with your studies. I imagine learning about cyber security will be very interesting also! What do you plan on doing for work whilst you’re studying from September? Do you have any savings? I don’t have any currently which again puts me of off going uni as I worry how I will survive.
I mean as I said I intend to graduate at 31 and will most likely be broke. No savings (definitely less than £10k probably more like £5k), no property etc. But I genuinely would much rather that than still be stuck in corporate sales. I say this because with Cybersecurity I know that there is a realistic pathway once I have enough experience to get myself £5k-£10k a month clients. Some people will say "no way, stop dreaming" but some of the top firms charge £10k a day for their fees so I know £10k a month will be more than realistic if I gain enough experience and decided to go my own way. Even if I remained employed until retirement there are realistic pathways to get well into the 6-figures salary. I would imagine it's the same in psychology if you gain enough experience you can target rich clientele - we know from recent events that even those at the top have issues and will gladly pay top dollar to have someone help them with that.

As far as having a house goes for me personally I probably am not looking for a house until I am 40 to be honest. I think the mistake many people make is jumping on the property ladder in their 20s and then realising they're trapped until the term is up. They can't quit their job and start a business or do their own thing (unless they've been lucky enough to land a high-paying career straight out of uni at 21 and saved a lot of money). As a random example I know someone who is 24 and has a job as a recruiter (good luck during economic downturns) and whose boyfriend is a carpenter. They have a joint mortgage and it is just clear that they will forever be trapped in their situation and will never be able to take justified risks in order to better themselves. I don't want to be in that situation.

In terms of what I am planning on doing for work I will either work part-time in a call-center just for food and travel expenses or, if I have time to learn a skill before my course starts I will do something like website design for small companies charging each just £500-£1000 to do a website for them. Even just 1 website a month will cover me. One thing I would say is don't worry about how you will "survive" financially. When I went to uni at 22 I moved to London I had just £200 in my account (my accommodation was covered by government grant + loan) but clearly £200 was not enough to live off. I found a way to get cash to survive and you will too. It's not that deep.

Felt like I've rambled a bit on this response so hope I didn't send you to sleep.
Last edited by Weeping_Angel; 1 month ago
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