Fleuves
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Hey TSR. Long time no see. I was very active here a few years back when I was applying for undergraduate medicine. Long story short, I was offered places at Southampton and Liverpool, where I had made a home. I wanted to stay living in Liverpool, but missed the conditions of my offer, by the skin of my teeth.
I was so utterly heartbroken I went into mad denial and fear mode (I'm not exactly a spring chicken) and started a nursing degree here. I'm due to graduate in September and surprise surprise I've got that ol' familiar longing for medicine back full throttle. It never really went away, I mean, I've wanted to be a doctor for 6 years now. But, when people say there's a stigma about nurses wanting to jump ship and become doctors, they really do mean it. I kept it hidden for two years, but this year I confessed to a lecturer and she has been so supportive; she'll write me a supporting statement.
I guess I always knew I'd want to pursue medicine again because with my nursing BN I can earn a decent living to put myself through the A100. I couldn't guarantee that with a BSc.
Liverpool won't accept me onto their GEM with a BN - I've already checked. So I'll apply to A100 Manchester, Lancaster, Keele and Liverpool.
Just hoping to connect with other nurses (or student nurses) who have made, or intend to make, the jump. Is there anybody out there?
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Hazelly
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(Original post by Fleuves)
Hey TSR. Long time no see. I was very active here a few years back when I was applying for undergraduate medicine. Long story short, I was offered places at Southampton and Liverpool, where I had made a home. I wanted to stay living in Liverpool, but missed the conditions of my offer, by the skin of my teeth.
I was so utterly heartbroken I went into mad denial and fear mode (I'm not exactly a spring chicken) and started a nursing degree here. I'm due to graduate in September and surprise surprise I've got that ol' familiar longing for medicine back full throttle. It never really went away, I mean, I've wanted to be a doctor for 6 years now. But, when people say there's a stigma about nurses wanting to jump ship and become doctors, they really do mean it. I kept it hidden for two years, but this year I confessed to a lecturer and she has been so supportive; she'll write me a supporting statement.
I guess I always knew I'd want to pursue medicine again because with my nursing BN I can earn a decent living to put myself through the A100. I couldn't guarantee that with a BSc.
Liverpool won't accept me onto their GEM with a BN - I've already checked. So I'll apply to A100 Manchester, Lancaster, Keele and Liverpool.
Just hoping to connect with other nurses (or student nurses) who have made, or intend to make, the jump. Is there anybody out there?
Hi,

I’m sorry to hear that you didn’t get in as an undergraduate student. But I like your endurance!

I have thought about doing this a lot - doing a nursing degree and then going into postgraduate medicine. But it’s so competitive, more so than undergrad. I’m currently thinking either foundation medicine or post grad, possibly.

Do you mind me asking what the nursing degree was like?

Also welcome back to TSR
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ForestCat
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(Original post by Fleuves)
Hey TSR. Long time no see. I was very active here a few years back when I was applying for undergraduate medicine. Long story short, I was offered places at Southampton and Liverpool, where I had made a home. I wanted to stay living in Liverpool, but missed the conditions of my offer, by the skin of my teeth.
I was so utterly heartbroken I went into mad denial and fear mode (I'm not exactly a spring chicken) and started a nursing degree here. I'm due to graduate in September and surprise surprise I've got that ol' familiar longing for medicine back full throttle. It never really went away, I mean, I've wanted to be a doctor for 6 years now. But, when people say there's a stigma about nurses wanting to jump ship and become doctors, they really do mean it. I kept it hidden for two years, but this year I confessed to a lecturer and she has been so supportive; she'll write me a supporting statement.
I guess I always knew I'd want to pursue medicine again because with my nursing BN I can earn a decent living to put myself through the A100. I couldn't guarantee that with a BSc.
Liverpool won't accept me onto their GEM with a BN - I've already checked. So I'll apply to A100 Manchester, Lancaster, Keele and Liverpool.
Just hoping to connect with other nurses (or student nurses) who have made, or intend to make, the jump. Is there anybody out there?
Are you sure about being able to earn enough to pay for A100? That’s going to be doing a lot of hours on top of a busy schedule and may be hard to keep going for four years. Have you thought about at least apply for gray entry for one cycle (places like Warwick)?
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Fleuves
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(Original post by ForestCat)
Are you sure about being able to earn enough to pay for A100? That’s going to be doing a lot of hours on top of a busy schedule and may be hard to keep going for four years. Have you thought about at least apply for gray entry for one cycle (places like Warwick)?
Hello thank you for your legitimate concern, I have considered these things myself. My spouse wants desperately to stay in the area and recognises that means helping me out a bit financially if we are both going to get the life we want. I feel quite assured we'll cope.
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by Fleuves)
Hello thank you for your legitimate concern, I have considered these things myself. My spouse wants desperately to stay in the area and recognises that means helping me out a bit financially if we are both going to get the life we want. I feel quite assured we'll cope.
ecolier may be able to shed some light.
Knows loads about medical entry
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ecolier
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(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
ecolier may be able to shed some light.
Knows loads about medical entry
:ta: but @ForestCat will be able to advise more as she was a nurse and now a doctor!
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Fleuves
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(Original post by Hazelly)
Hi,

I’m sorry to hear that you didn’t get in as an undergraduate student. But I like your endurance!

I have thought about doing this a lot - doing a nursing degree and then going into postgraduate medicine. But it’s so competitive, more so than undergrad. I’m currently thinking either foundation medicine or post grad, possibly.

Do you mind me asking what the nursing degree was like?

Also welcome back to TSR
The Southampton offer was for the Foundation entry, it was conditional only upon my DBS. I declined it because when I went there for my interview I stayed for a weekend, and I just couldn't see myself living there for 6yrs. I'd had a disruptive childhood and at that stage I had found stability in Liverpool and desperately wanted to stay there. But if you can get into a Foundation programme, I recommend it. I did the Access to Medicine diploma so I was ineligible for Liverpool Foundation entry.

I really did try to persuade myself nursing would be a good alternative. Someone very close to me at the time said 'better an excellent nurse than a mediocre doctor'. I realise now they didn't have my best interests at heart and that comment cut down my confidence quite badly.

I do have a lot of the qualities of an excellent nurse, I am compassionate, I'm a good 'project manager' ie able to pull all the different parts together, I care about advocacy, enabling choice, and I respect and protect the fact that people open up to me. I have enjoyed being able to care for vulnerable people and identify and implement ways to personalise care. But time and time again I've grown frustrated at the limits of the role, and, if I'm being honest, the pressures within the nursing profession. I always find myself saying 'I'll talk to the doctor for you' or 'Bring that up when you see the doctor in the morning' ... In my experience most patients care most about their medical needs rather than their nursing needs, and I feel I would be better suited to helping them with those medical needs because I always find myself wishing I had the answers for them. On placements I gravitate towards medics and I read up on pharmacology, specialty conditions and physiology whenever I'm prompted by a curious thought.

The degree has been a lot harder than I anticipated. I get four weeks annual leave a year, just like a full-time job. My time is split into blocks of theory and practice, when I'm on practice placement I'm out for between 8-12 weeks, full-time. I do 2300hrs of practice placement over the three years. The theory work was really unfulfilling until my second semester of second year - it has gotten a lot more interesting since then, with modules in critical care and enhancing clinical practice, like caring for tracheostomies and chest drains. I have worked as a healthcare assistant throughout my training too, sometimes the roles are a bit blurry, but generally I do protect my learning status when I'm on placement.

I am proud to become a nurse and it's amazing job - I can never not appreciate the work nurses do. Sadly I have also met a lot of indifferent (not negligent or unkind, just indifferent) nurses over these years and sometimes it's a symptom of the relentless pressure nurses are under, but other times I think it's just because it used to be an easy career to gain entry to and that attracted people who weren't necessarily suited to it. I appreciate medics also risk compassion fatigue and that sometimes people go into medicine for the wrong reasons and this can be seen in their attitude ... But I do feel medics have a collective ambitious identity whereby they value progress. Lifelong learning is expected and nurtured. Whilst this is present in the nursing profession I do feel it's a bit diluted and I often feel like I just don't belong. I want to be more involved with research and I have really enjoyed literature reviews - these things you do once in your nursing degree and then have to specialise as a research nurse to really continue involvement with once qualified, but in medicine there are more opportunities for involvement in this kind of thing.

Anyway I'm kind of babbling on now, aren't I! I can only speak from my own experience which is, of course, shadowed by the circumstances in which I pursued nursing.
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