mintchocchip
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I'd like to do a BSc and then hopefully Masters and PhD (as I think most employers would value higher degrees) and maybe go into research or the NHS STP programme.

At the moment I don't have the intention to be an IBMS accredited Biomed Scientist so I'm not asking in any relation to that .

So what is the difference between them? I've seen on the course structures that Biomed has more Immunology and Microbiology content (which I'm really interested at the moment) whereas Biochem is more cellular and molecular biology.

Bascially, which is better in terms of jobs etc., and if I did a Biomed BSc could I then do a Biochem MSci if I found I liked it? I know most Masters programmes ask for Biochem or Biomed etc (sorry I'm rambling now).

Also, do employers look more at what your masters or PhD is in rather than what your BSc is in? And are Oxbridge (or maybe Imperial/UCL) graduates favoured by them because of the Uni?

Thank you to anyone who can clear up confusion
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Study With Liv
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I did biomed as my undergrad degree and molecular biology research masters and now I work in biochemistry research, so I'd say that biomed was a pretty good way to learn a broad range of subjects and then you can specialise into more specific areas as you progress.
A lot of other people I work with did biomed/biology/biochem but some have chemistry backgrounds - I think that these subjects all overlap quite a lot and you can tailor your experience depending on what you're interested in.
I can't really comment on the other degrees, but I found biomed was a great course if you're interested in human biology and open to learning about lots of areas (this worked for me because I didn't know which field I wanted to go into). You get to study a huge range of subjects - from neuroscience to haematology to microbiology, this starts more generally in 1st year (anatomy, cell biology, pathology, genetics, etc) and gradually becomes more focused and you're able to select units/projects in certain fields.
Look at the subjects covered by the courses you're applying to and think about what you'll enjoy the most, at the end of the day you'll do better if you find the content interesting and enjoy uni.

You can definitely apply to a biochem masters with a biomed degree, you'd just have to focus on the relevant things you learnt in your applications. I know people who went on to do all kinds of further education including biochemistry, biotechnology, medicine, marine biology and even someone who switched it up and studied a business Ma.

I don't think the uni you go to matters that much, I think your grades and the actual skills you develop are far more important. Obviously some academics will favour Oxbridge graduates but a lot of other unis have amazing research centres now so I wouldn't put too much emphasis on that - worry more about developing your practical/writing skills and getting top marks.

If you're interested in carrying on your education to a PhD I'd really recommend doing a research masters as this is set up like a mini PhD, it's like 80/90% lab based and I think it's a really good way to develop your research skills and prepare you for working in research or carrying on to a PhD. It's a good way to learn lots of new skills and also hopefully get a couple of publications on your CV - all of this will really strengthen your PhD applications.

wow sorry for rambling on, I hope this answered all your questions
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mintchocchip
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(Original post by Study With Liv)
I did biomed as my undergrad degree and molecular biology research masters and now I work in biochemistry research, so I'd say that biomed was a pretty good way to learn a broad range of subjects and then you can specialise into more specific areas as you progress.
A lot of other people I work with did biomed/biology/biochem but some have chemistry backgrounds - I think that these subjects all overlap quite a lot and you can tailor your experience depending on what you're interested in.
I can't really comment on the other degrees, but I found biomed was a great course if you're interested in human biology and open to learning about lots of areas (this worked for me because I didn't know which field I wanted to go into). You get to study a huge range of subjects - from neuroscience to haematology to microbiology, this starts more generally in 1st year (anatomy, cell biology, pathology, genetics, etc) and gradually becomes more focused and you're able to select units/projects in certain fields.
Look at the subjects covered by the courses you're applying to and think about what you'll enjoy the most, at the end of the day you'll do better if you find the content interesting and enjoy uni.

You can definitely apply to a biochem masters with a biomed degree, you'd just have to focus on the relevant things you learnt in your applications. I know people who went on to do all kinds of further education including biochemistry, biotechnology, medicine, marine biology and even someone who switched it up and studied a business Ma.

I don't think the uni you go to matters that much, I think your grades and the actual skills you develop are far more important. Obviously some academics will favour Oxbridge graduates but a lot of other unis have amazing research centres now so I wouldn't put too much emphasis on that - worry more about developing your practical/writing skills and getting top marks.

If you're interested in carrying on your education to a PhD I'd really recommend doing a research masters as this is set up like a mini PhD, it's like 80/90% lab based and I think it's a really good way to develop your research skills and prepare you for working in research or carrying on to a PhD. It's a good way to learn lots of new skills and also hopefully get a couple of publications on your CV - all of this will really strengthen your PhD applications.

wow sorry for rambling on, I hope this answered all your questions
That’s great thank you so much
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artful_lounger
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A "biomedical sciences" degree is functionally a degree in (human) physiology - Oxford's course used to be called "Physiological Sciences" and the equivalent course in Natural Sciences at Cambridge is called Physiology, Development, and Neuroscience. Biomedical sciences is just a more common terminology these days (and does include a slightly broader range of subjects sometimes, such as in pharmacology and neuroscience). A biochemistry degree, in the UK, is essentially a degree in molecular and cell biology. Oxford's course is actually subtitled "Molecular and Cellular" Biochemistry, although it does have more chemistry content than many biochem courses; most such courses aren't so heavy on the chemistry side.

There is then an overlap in the course content, but generally biochemistry will focus on the "fundamental" aspects of biological science (working from the bottom up) and is not specific to human (or even animal) biological processes. Biomedical sciences on the other hand will generally focus more on a) humans and b) more "top down" approaches (although it does meet up with biochemistry in the area of developmental biology, which often spans both areas, and so does include some "bottom up" aspects of cell physiology, and will include at least basic content in molecular/cell biology and biochemistry which underpin physiology and e.g. metabolism). However at the undergraduate level, at many universities at least the first year (and not infrequently at least some of the second year) for each course will often consist of many of the same modules (see for example UCL and Southampton's BMS and Biochem courses).

Either course would be suitable for a pretty wide range of graduate studies, including many PhD projects, although I might suggest biochemistry a slightly better background if you aren't sure you specifically want to pursue the (human) biomedical/physiological sciences side of things since it would also be a suitable background for many projects in e.g. plant sciences, zoology, marine biology, and in the range of "biomolecular" sciences (e.g. biochemistry, biomedical sciences, pharmacology, cell/molecular/developmental biology etc). A biochemistry degree might also give you background in a slightly wider range of biological lab techniques than biomedical sciences (although this might well depend on the course and on options taken within it).

Outside of grad studies, prospects in graduate roles (either within bioscience related sectors or outside of them) are going to be fairly similar and include largely the same roles. The main difference will be within bioscience related sectors, where depending on the exact content of your degree you may or may not have covered the lab techniques a given role is looking for. For more generalist grad schemes (in e.g. media, law, business, finance, civil service, etc) it won't make a difference which you study. If you wanted to go onto graduate entry medicine or dentistry a BMS course might have slightly more overlap with the content you would cover in preclinical phases, but I gather the approach to those areas is a little different in clinical courses and no matter what you studied as a first degree by the end of the preclinical phase you should all be on the same footing anyway roughly. I'm not aware of GEM courses specifically preferring one or the other - for those that require a "biological sciences" degree, either course would meet the requirement, and many GEM courses just require a STEM degree generally and a fair number now accept graduates from any degree.
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mintchocchip
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
A "biomedical sciences" degree is functionally a degree in (human) physiology - Oxford's course used to be called "Physiological Sciences" and the equivalent course in Natural Sciences at Cambridge is called Physiology, Development, and Neuroscience. Biomedical sciences is just a more common terminology these days (and does include a slightly broader range of subjects sometimes, such as in pharmacology and neuroscience). A biochemistry degree, in the UK, is essentially a degree in molecular and cell biology. Oxford's course is actually subtitled "Molecular and Cellular" Biochemistry, although it does have more chemistry content than many biochem courses; most such courses aren't so heavy on the chemistry side.

There is then an overlap in the course content, but generally biochemistry will focus on the "fundamental" aspects of biological science (working from the bottom up) and is not specific to human (or even animal) biological processes. Biomedical sciences on the other hand will generally focus more on a) humans and b) more "top down" approaches (although it does meet up with biochemistry in the area of developmental biology, which often spans both areas, and so does include some "bottom up" aspects of cell physiology, and will include at least basic content in molecular/cell biology and biochemistry which underpin physiology and e.g. metabolism). However at the undergraduate level, at many universities at least the first year (and not infrequently at least some of the second year) for each course will often consist of many of the same modules (see for example UCL and Southampton's BMS and Biochem courses).

Either course would be suitable for a pretty wide range of graduate studies, including many PhD projects, although I might suggest biochemistry a slightly better background if you aren't sure you specifically want to pursue the (human) biomedical/physiological sciences side of things since it would also be a suitable background for many projects in e.g. plant sciences, zoology, marine biology, and in the range of "biomolecular" sciences (e.g. biochemistry, biomedical sciences, pharmacology, cell/molecular/developmental biology etc). A biochemistry degree might also give you background in a slightly wider range of biological lab techniques than biomedical sciences (although this might well depend on the course and on options taken within it).

Outside of grad studies, prospects in graduate roles (either within bioscience related sectors or outside of them) are going to be fairly similar and include largely the same roles. The main difference will be within bioscience related sectors, where depending on the exact content of your degree you may or may not have covered the lab techniques a given role is looking for. For more generalist grad schemes (in e.g. media, law, business, finance, civil service, etc) it won't make a difference which you study. If you wanted to go onto graduate entry medicine or dentistry a BMS course might have slightly more overlap with the content you would cover in preclinical phases, but I gather the approach to those areas is a little different in clinical courses and no matter what you studied as a first degree by the end of the preclinical phase you should all be on the same footing anyway roughly. I'm not aware of GEM courses specifically preferring one or the other - for those that require a "biological sciences" degree, either course would meet the requirement, and many GEM courses just require a STEM degree generally and a fair number now accept graduates from any degree.
Thank you so much!
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nexttime
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(Original post by pinkbacon1437)
Also, do employers look more at what your masters or PhD is in rather than what your BSc is in? And are Oxbridge (or maybe Imperial/UCL) graduates favoured by them because of the Uni?

Thank you to anyone who can clear up confusion
I mean, I don't think many people do a PhD just for job prospects in a general sense? A PhD is a job of sorts - you are paid (a small amount), you have responsibilities etc. You will be working in a very very specific area, with minimal skills overlap with anything outside your field. Correct me if I'm wrong, but whereas you see lots of jobs requiring a degree, and maybe a few a masters, outside of academia you never see an employer require a PhD. And it takes so long and is so low paid... you only do it if you are going into that specific field.

But academia is what you are interested in.
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mintchocchip
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(Original post by nexttime)
I mean, I don't think many people do a PhD just for job prospects in a general sense? A PhD is a job of sorts - you are paid (a small amount), you have responsibilities etc. You will be working in a very very specific area, with minimal skills overlap with anything outside your field. Correct me if I'm wrong, but whereas you see lots of jobs requiring a degree, and maybe a few a masters, outside of academia you never see an employer require a PhD. And it takes so long and is so low paid... you only do it if you are going into that specific field.

But academia is what you are interested in.
Thanks I think I'd like to do a PhD, as I guess I'd probably go towards research if the Clinical healthcare path didn't work out, but we'll see... :/
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