CGP revision guide+past paper questions for A level biology

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Azotic
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If one made notes from cgp revision guide, and did a lot of practice paper questions on the topic, is this enough to get an A/A* considering doing 20+ questions on the topic too, and memorising mark scheme answers. I have a levels in about 3-4 months, and i find the textbooks are way too much to cover for me in this short period of time. I would really appreciate any advice, thank you.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Azotic)
If one made notes from cgp revision guide, and did a lot of practice paper questions on the topic, is this enough to get an A/A* considering doing 20+ questions on the topic too, and memorising mark scheme answers. I have a levels in about 3-4 months, and i find the textbooks are way too much to cover for me in this short period of time. I would really appreciate any advice, thank you.
Didn't you ask this question a few days ago?

CGP revision guides are good for getting a general overview of a topic (particularly for revision) but aren't enough in themselves to access the top grades. In fact, no single book is sufficient. You need to be using a variety of sources of information: coursebooks, general reference books, reliable and authoritative internet resources, accessible academic papers etc.

Memorising mark scheme answers is a bit desperate, to be honest. I highly recommend you do lots of past questions and mark them accurately using the MS so you can practice your exam technique, but 'memorising answers' isn't really the way to go.

I think you need to have a frank assessment of where you are with your work/revision and how much you can realistically achieve in the time left to you.
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Azotic
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Didn't you ask this question a few days ago?

CGP revision guides are good for getting a general overview of a topic (particularly for revision) but aren't enough in themselves to access the top grades. In fact, no single book is sufficient. You need to be using a variety of sources of information: coursebooks, general reference books, reliable and authoritative internet resources, accessible academic papers etc.

Memorising mark scheme answers is a bit desperate, to be honest. I highly recommend you do lots of past questions and mark them accurately using the MS so you can practice your exam technique, but 'memorising answers' isn't really the way to go.

I think you need to have a frank assessment of where you are with your work/revision and how much you can realistically achieve in the time left to you.
Oh, sorry im a bit worried. So you are saying its too late to get an A now even if i do do a lot of practice paper questions and using the CGP revision guide?
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(Original post by Azotic)
Oh, sorry im a bit worried. So you are saying its too late to get an A now even if i do do a lot of practice paper questions and using the CGP revision guide?
Neither I, nor anyone else on TSR is qualified to make that judgement. We don't know your aptitude, work ethic, previous attainment...

A lot of it depends on how much work you've done already, and your ability. If you've been working consistently, and getting good results in in-class assessments/essays, then there's no reason to think you can't do well. People usually write these sorts of posts because they've done three-fifths of **** all work, and suddenly panic and want to know if they can still get an A*. The answer to that, nine times out of ten, is 'no'. But if this isn't you, and you've been working well and just worried that you don't have enough time to revise the content, then don't worry: just work consistently and methodically using, as I said before, a variety of sources.
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Neither I, nor anyone else on TSR is qualified to make that judgement. We don't know your aptitude, work ethic, previous attainment...

A lot of it depends on how much work you've done already, and your ability. If you've been working consistently, and getting good results in in-class assessments/essays, then there's no reason to think you can't do well. People usually write these sorts of posts because they've done three-fifths of **** all work, and suddenly panic and want to know if they can still get an A*. The answer to that, nine times out of ten, is 'no'. But if this isn't you, and you've been working well and just worried that you don't have enough time to revise the content, then don't worry: just work consistently and methodically using, as I said before, a variety of sources.
Since year 13 i have been revising consistently biology, usually at least 1 hour a day, but in tests my grades seems to range from D's to B's. I would say i know most topics really well, but i have to go over a 3 modules for year 1 which i am a bit weak on, and i did no practice paper questions on any topic, just a flimsy past paper 1-2 days before the exam. In this holiday i've been revising biology consistently for 2 hours a day, and im hoping to keep that up until exams. Also, ive only now started to learn how useful practice paper questions are for each topic; before i used to just take notes from CGP revision guide and do the questions at the end of the page. I really do understand what you are saying about understanding the mark scheme rather than memorising it, so ive started making flash cards underlining key words such as Describe and Explain, and how to answer the question from that. I'm hoping to get all the practice paper questions done by the end of march, so in April i can just focus on topics which are weak, and so do some revision and even more questions on the weak topics. In may i am just going to do all the past papers i can find on biology. I know you cant judge whether or not i will get an A, but does this sound like a good enough plan? I'm just trying to make sure im using my time most wisely right now before its too late, and i appreciate all of the advice. Thank you.
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(Original post by Azotic)
Since year 13 i have been revising consistently biology, usually at least 1 hour a day, but in tests my grades seems to range from D's to B's. I would say i know most topics really well, but i have to go over a 3 modules for year 1 which i am a bit weak on, and i did no practice paper questions on any topic, just a flimsy past paper 1-2 days before the exam. In this holiday i've been revising biology consistently for 2 hours a day, and im hoping to keep that up until exams. Also, ive only now started to learn how useful practice paper questions are for each topic; before i used to just take notes from CGP revision guide and do the questions at the end of the page. I really do understand what you are saying about understanding the mark scheme rather than memorising it, so ive started making flash cards underlining key words such as Describe and Explain, and how to answer the question from that. I'm hoping to get all the practice paper questions done by the end of march, so in April i can just focus on topics which are weak, and so do some revision and even more questions on the weak topics. In may i am just going to do all the past papers i can find on biology. I know you cant judge whether or not i will get an A, but does this sound like a good enough plan? I'm just trying to make sure im using my time most wisely right now before its too late, and i appreciate all of the advice. Thank you.
You're welcome

Yes, that sounds like an excellent plan to me. Practising exam questions is so crucial because you can think you know how to answer a question but when it comes to it you don't use the right words, or miss important bits and end up not gaining the marks. Be very rigorous with the MS when marking your paper, and always use the 'notes' column as we examiners would.

More generally, always learn your definitions. These are easy marks, which are too often thrown away by candidates.
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Azotic
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(Original post by Reality Check)
You're welcome

Yes, that sounds like an excellent plan to me. Practising exam questions is so crucial because you can think you know how to answer a question but when it comes to it you don't use the right words, or miss important bits and end up not gaining the marks. Be very rigorous with the MS when marking your paper, and always use the 'notes' column as we examiners would.

More generally, always learn your definitions. These are easy marks, which are too often thrown away by candidates.
Okay, thanks for all the advice, I'll be sure to use more resources online aswell for revision.
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(Original post by Azotic)
Okay, thanks for all the advice, I'll be sure to use more resources online aswell for revision.
Just make sure that they are verifiable, reliable and comparable to a published source.
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