DSA for ADHD, what can I ask for?

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Silent0239
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My sixth form had this table that you could sit and stand to use, I really liked it and found it very useful. I could easily just stand and essentially hop on the spot and continue doing my work for some time. Can I ask for one of those? It's like £400 though, I don't want to seem like I want to exploit the benefits.

Also, I have very poor notes organisation skills, pretty much non-existent. I had a go at my friend's iPad Pro with that writing stylus thing and some app, I found that to be quite easy and effective. Can I ask for that too?

I am aware of university accommodations, and I will definitely try to get those too. Like rest breaks, and extended deadlines. Any other accommodations that I can ask for?
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Pathway
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They'll go over various things with you in your assessment. You'll likely get a range of software (mindmapping, etc.), perhaps some hardware and maybe a study skills mentor. I'm not sure about an iPad, there has to be a need for it and your funding body has to agree and they might not (even if your assessor agrees!).
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Lovesick
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How does an adjustable height table help you overcome your disability related study issues?
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jwater148
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Yes, I just got a height-adjustable table, and various other ergonomic equipment totalling ~£2k. You get just under £6k/year in the large item allowance. I am diagnosed hEDS and ADHD-C.

You could certainly make the case that this would benefit your ADHD, however, most people with ADHD have hypermobility/hEDS. Even if you aren't diagnosed with this, if you score highly on the Brighton test, alongside the evidence in the literature showing the connection being the disorders - your GP may be willing to say this equipment would benefit you.

In terms of Uni stuff, I got;
* Access the Accessible Tech room in the library so I could have a consistent place to go which was quiet and had seats available. (Originally given a key to a 'study room' which was a gross tiny box room with one seat - on the busiest level of the library - which you shared access to with 15 other students)
* Extra 15 minutes per hour in a separate room for exams. (They originally put me in the same exam room, which was useless as I lost ~15min with people coming in and getting seated)
* I got a 'study coach' in 2nd year. I insisted I should get my own ADHD Coach as a non-specialist wouldn't have a clue how to handle ADHD - but my Disability Advisor wasn't having it. I stopped it after one semester as they weren't any help, they basically brought a print-out of a calendar and were going to get me to fill it in before seeing my complex task management system I'd been building up.

I know people in other Unis who got an automatic 2 week grace period of late assignments, alternative exams (not a final exam, but an essay to be submitted on the day of the final exam).

Unfortunately, SAAS has no concrete guidelines. The Uni's 'preferred suppliers' are granted a monopoly and extort DSA funds providing inadequate services and equipment. There are no recommendations for accommodations from SAAS either meaning if you don't fight for these things they'll give you nothing.

You have no chance of getting an iPad Pro, they'll give you a standard laptop if you don't already have one. I had to upgrade my Macbook and despite having used macs exclusively for ~15 years, and having specialist task-management software that would only run on mac - the chance of me getting a mac was still 0. I ended up just buying it out of pocket 2nd hand.
Last edited by jwater148; 8 months ago
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Pathway
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(Original post by jwater148)
Yes, I just got a height-adjustable table, and various other ergonomic equipment totalling ~£2k. You get just under £6k/year in the large item allowance. I am diagnosed hEDS and ADHD-C.

You could certainly make the case that this would benefit your ADHD, however, most people with ADHD have hypermobility/hEDS. Even if you aren't diagnosed with this, if you score highly on the Brighton test, alongside the evidence in the literature showing the connection being the disorders - your GP may be willing to say this equipment would benefit you.

In terms of Uni stuff, I got;
* Access the Accessible Tech room in the library so I could have a consistent place to go which was quiet and had seats available. (Originally given a key to a 'study room' which was a gross tiny box room with one seat - on the busiest level of the library - which you shared access to with 15 other students)
* Extra 15 minutes per hour in a separate room for exams. (They originally put me in the same exam room, which was useless as I lost ~15min with people coming in and getting seated)
* I got a 'study coach' in 2nd year. I insisted I should get my own ADHD Coach as a non-specialist wouldn't have a clue how to handle ADHD - but my Disability Advisor wasn't having it. I stopped it after one semester as they weren't any help, they basically brought a print-out of a calendar and were going to get me to fill it in before seeing my complex task management system I'd been building up.

I know people in other Unis who got an automatic 2 week grace period of late assignments, alternative exams (not a final exam, but an essay to be submitted on the day of the final exam).

Unfortunately, SAAS has no concrete guidelines. The Uni's 'preferred suppliers' are granted a monopoly and extort DSA funds providing inadequate services and equipment. There are no recommendations for accommodations from SAAS either meaning if you don't fight for these things they'll give you nothing.

You have no chance of getting an iPad Pro, they'll give you a standard laptop if you don't already have one. I had to upgrade my Macbook and despite having used macs exclusively for ~15 years, and having specialist task-management software that would only run on mac - the chance of me getting a mac was still 0. I ended up just buying it out of pocket 2nd hand.
Having hypermobility doesn't mean you have hEDS/HSD and bringing it up when someone hasn't said anything around chronic pain etc. id sorta not particularly relevant. There is no reason to look into this. Having ADHD doesn't mean you're automatically hypermobile either even if there is a weak link with it (like there is with autism, anxiety and eating disorders etc.). Also, it is the Beighton Score - the Brighton Criteria is no longer in use as of 2017. Having a high Beighton Score doesn't mean anything in isolation either. You still need to fulfil other criteria laid out in the new 2017 criteria.
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alex_glasgow
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(Original post by Pathway)
Having hypermobility doesn't mean you have hEDS/HSD and bringing it up when someone hasn't said anything around chronic pain etc. id sorta not particularly relevant. There is no reason to look into this. Having ADHD doesn't mean you're automatically hypermobile either even if there is a weak link with it (like there is with autism, anxiety and eating disorders etc.). Also, it is the Beighton Score - the Brighton Criteria is no longer in use as of 2017. Having a high Beighton Score doesn't mean anything in isolation either. You still need to fulfil other criteria laid out in the new 2017 criteria.
There is no clinical difference.

According to the National Library of Medicine’s Guide to understanding Genetic conditions, “The signs and symptoms of benign joint hypermobility syndrome overlap significantly with those of the hypermobile type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Studies suggest that they may be forms of the same condition.”0

The criteria has no clinical value

The HSD/hEDS diagnostic split, the science and procedures by which the split occurred and the actual diagnostic criteria have been criticized.1,2 Since 2017, multiple studies have found the distinctions drawn between HSD and hEDS may not match clinical experience and observations 3,4 nor the current understanding of the mechanisms underlying HSD/hEDS which are based on microscope, transcriptome and proteome analyses.5,6


0. https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/gene/TNXB#normalfunction

1. Anne Martin, An acquired or heritable connective tissue disorder? A review of hypermobile Ehlers Danlos Syndrome, European Journal of Medical Genetics, Volume 62, Issue 7, 2019, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejmg.2019.103672.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...69721218309364
2. Williams, A. N. (2019). Ehlers-Danlos syndromes: new labels confuse everyone. BMJ, l6095. doi:10.1136/bmj.l6095
3. McGillis, L, Mittal, N, Santa Mina, D, et al. Utilization of the 2017 diagnostic criteria for hEDS by the Toronto GoodHope Ehlers–Danlos syndrome clinic: A retrospective review. Am J Med Genet Part A. 2019; 1– 9. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.61459
4. Massimiliano Copetti, Silvia Morlino, Marina Colombi, Paola Grammatico, Andrea Fontana, Marco Castori, Severity classes in adults with hypermobile Ehlers–Danlos syndrome/hypermobility spectrum disorders: a pilot study of 105 Italian patients, Rheumatology, Volume 58, Issue 10, October 2019, Pages 1722–1730, https://doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/kez029 Severity classes in adults with hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome/hypermobility spectrum disorders: a pilot study of 105 Italian patients.

5. Nicoletta Zoppi, Nicola Chiarelli, Silvia Binetti, Marco Ritelli, Marina Colombi,
Dermal fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transition sustained by αvß3 integrin-ILK-Snail1/Slug signaling is a common feature for hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and hypermobility spectrum disorders, Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular Basis of Disease, Volume 1864, Issue 4, Part A, 2018, Pages 1010-1023,
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbadis.2018.01.005. Dermal fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transition sustained by αvß3 integrin-ILK-Snail1/Slug signaling is a common feature for hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and hypermobility spectrum disorders

6. Chiarelli, N., Ritelli, M., Zoppi, N., & Colombi, M. (2019). Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms in the Pathogenesis of Classical, Vascular, and Hypermobile Ehlers‒Danlos Syndromes. Genes, 10(8), 609. doi:10.3390/genes10080609
Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms in the Pathogenesis of Classical, Vascular, and Hypermobile Ehlers‒Danlos Syndromes



There is certainly a connection worth exploring

Hypermobility and autonomic hyperacitivty (2019)

It is likely that the importance of hypermobility and autonomic dysfunction to the generation and maintenance of psychopathology in neurodevelopmental disorders is poorly appreciated. This mechanism might explain increased vulnerability to stress sensitive and developmental neuropsychiatric conditions. — https://jnnp.bmj.com/content/85/8/e3.40


Joint hypermobility and the heritable disorders of connective tissue: clinical and empirical evidence of links with psychiatry (2015)
https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...63834314002643

In 1988, Hofman et al. [58], in a sample of 30 children with MFS, observed that 17% had attention deficit disorder with or without hyperactivity. A decade later, Harris [59] stated, based on his clinical experience with 200 patients with ADHD, that "hypermobile joints are an uncommon finding in those who do not have attention deficit disorder/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder." In Sweden, Hollertz [60], [61] also pointed out the frequent co-occurrence of ADHD and JH in adults patients. He observed that an orientation to orthopedic and rehabilitation care was common in these patients due to joint problems. Thus, this author speculates about a possible genetic marker common to ADHD and EDS. Recently, Koldas Dogan et al. [62] explored JH using the Beighton score in 54 children with ADHD compared to 36 healthy controls. In this study, JH was significantly more frequent among patients than among controls (31.5% vs. 13.9%). In accordance with these results, Shiari et al. [63] also found a higher prevalence of JH, assessed with the same method of the previous study, among Iranian children with ADHD compared to controls (74.4% vs. 12.8%), confirming an association between ADHD and abnormal collagen conditions.

Autism, Joint Hypermobility-Related Disorders and Pain
ASD and HRDs, specially hEDS, are conditions with a strong genetic component, a polymorphic clinical presentation, appearing both in infancy, and sharing several phenotypical features (35). Although existing data does not allow to ascertain increase prevalence of ASD in HRDs, as well as shared underlying patho-mechanisms between both conditions, there is increasing evidence suggesting that these co-occur more often than expected by chance. This requires be confirmed by further investigation which should consider the recent nosological changes both in EDS and the hypermobility spectrum disorders [see (17, 38)], and in ASD (72). https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6292952

Joint hypermobility and the heritable disorders of connective tissue: clinical and empirical evidence of links with psychiatry
  • In 1988, Hofman et al.[58], in a sample of 30 children with MFS,observed that 17% had attention deficit disorder with or without hyperactivity. A decade later, Harris[59] stated, based on his clinical experience with 200 patients with ADHD, that "hyper mobile joints are an uncommon finding in those who do not have attention deficit disorder/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder."
  • In Sweden,Hollertz[60,61] also pointed out the frequent co-occurrence of ADHD and JH in adults patients. He observed that an orientation to orthopedic and rehabilitation care was common in these patients due to joint problems. Thus, this author speculates about a possible genetic marker com-mon to ADHD and EDS.
  • Recently, Koldas Dogan et al.[62]explored JH using the Beighton score in 54 children with ADHD compared to 36healthy controls. In this study, JH was significantly more frequentamong patients than among controls (31.5% vs. 13.9%). In accor-dance with these results,
  • Shiari et al.[63]also found a higher prev-alence of JH, assessed with the same method of the previous study,among Iranian children with ADHD compared to controls (74.4%vs. 12.8%), confirming an association between ADHD and abnormal collagen conditions.

The same accomodations would be made for anyone hypermobile.
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