PatriciaBright
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"Some key features of effective partnership working is partners consult on a shared vision to underpin their work at an operational and strategic level"

i'm revising for my exam and i don't think i'll remember it with these words. like consult and underpin. i don't understand what it means
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Reality Check
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(Original post by PatriciaBright)
"Some key features of effective partnership working is partners consult on a shared vision to underpin their work at an operational and strategic level"

i'm revising for my exam and i don't think i'll remember it with these words. like consult and underpin. i don't understand what it means
Hello again

Eurgh, what a disgusting sentence. It should be taken out into the streets and beaten.

How about: "An effective way of working in a team is when all team members are signed up to the same goals and work together to achieve them"

It says the same thing, without all the silly managerial-ese words.
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PatriciaBright
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Hello again

Eurgh, what a disgusting sentence. It should be taken out into the streets and beaten.

How about: "An effective way of working in a team is when all team members are signed up to the same goals and work together to achieve them"

It says the same thing, without all the silly managerial-ese words.
Hi, great to see you again

Exactly. All these fancy words.

how about this one? there's a few more if you dont mind.

Partnerships have structure and governance arrangements that set out the purpose and principles of working collaboration
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Reality Check
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(Original post by PatriciaBright)
Hi, great to see you again

Exactly. All these fancy words.

how about this one? there's a few more if you dont mind.

Partnerships have structure and governance arrangements that set out the purpose and principles of working collaboration
Yes, that's fine. Just post them here. What's the subject, by the way? I thought you did Healthcare? It would help with the 'translation' to know what area we're talking about (this sounds quite business studies/law)
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(Original post by PatriciaBright)
Hi, great to see you again

Exactly. All these fancy words.

how about this one? there's a few more if you dont mind.

Partnerships have structure and governance arrangements that set out the purpose and principles of working collaboration
Translation:

"A 'partnership' is a formal structure with clear rules as to how each partner will work together with the others:
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PatriciaBright
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Yes, that's fine. Just post them here. What's the subject, by the way? I thought you did Healthcare? It would help with the 'translation' to know what area we're talking about (this sounds quite business studies/law)
It is health and social care. But there's partnership in health and social care too. like social workers and nurses working together.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by PatriciaBright)
It is health and social care. But there's partnership in health and social care too. like social workers and nurses working together.
Ah right. A 'partnership' is a formal type of business structure you see, that's why I"m asking.

Take out the word 'formal' in the previous 'translation' and that works still.
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Oxford Mum
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Hello again

Eurgh, what a disgusting sentence. It should be taken out into the streets and beaten.

How about: "An effective way of working in a team is when all team members are signed up to the same goals and work together to achieve them"

It says the same thing, without all the silly managerial-ese words.
Thanks Reality for keeping it real yet again...
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Oxford Mum)
Thanks Reality for keeping it real yet again...
:hat2: Thank you - I do try.
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Oxford Mum
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(Original post by PatriciaBright)
It is health and social care. But there's partnership in health and social care too. like social workers and nurses working together.
How about NHSFan
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PatriciaBright
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Ah right. A 'partnership' is a formal type of business structure you see, that's why I"m asking.

Take out the word 'formal' in the previous 'translation' and that works still.
I know. It looks to bussinessy.

What about this one?

An effective way for working in a team is communication strategies enable staff understanding and embrace a common working language for effective dissemination, ensuring practices are understood.
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PatriciaBright
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(Original post by Oxford Mum)
How about NHSFan
I'm fine with Reality check but thanks
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Oxford Mum
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Everyone is fine with reality check

I wanted to call nhs fan as she recruits doctors and nurses but I haven’t posted with her for ages and wondered how she was
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(Original post by Oxford Mum)
Everyone is fine with reality check
I think the ISOC-ers and associated hangers-on might disagree with that :laugh:

Thanks: I haven't seen her for a while either :iiam:
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(Original post by PatriciaBright)
I know. It looks to bussinessy.

What about this one?

An effective way for working in a team is communication strategies enable staff understanding and embrace a common working language for effective dissemination, ensuring practices are understood.
Where are all these terrible sentences coming from?! Don't tell me it's a textbook, surely?

Anyway... how about:

"When working in a team it's important that everyone communicates in a way that allows all team members to understand what is being discussed and what is required"
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PatriciaBright
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Where are all these terrible sentences coming from?! Don't tell me it's a textbook, surely?

Anyway... how about:

"When working in a team it's important that everyone communicates in a way that allows all team members to understand what is being discussed and what is required"
lol no, it's an online material from my college. then i asked my tutor and she provided me with an even complicated answer!

the question is identify the key features of effective working. so is that sentence still good for it?
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(Original post by PatriciaBright)
lol no, it's an online material from my college. then i asked my tutor and she provided me with an even complicated answer!

the question is identify the key features of effective working. so is that sentence still good for it?
Oh, crikey!

Yes, it's good for it. Essentially, all those words are just saying that if you work in a team (particularly a MDT where there might be people of very differing education levels) all members need to ensure that the language they use and method of communicating with each other allows everyone to fully understand what's going on. An example of where this can go wrong is where you have two consultants on the team using a load of medical acronyms and abbreviations which make sense to them, but not to anyone else on the team.

The irony of these sentences all being about 'effective communication' when they're written in this opaque, unnecessary language is hilarious! You should point this out to your tutor.

Any more you want translating?
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PatriciaBright
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Oh, crikey!

Yes, it's good for it. Essentially, all those words are just saying that if you work in a team (particularly a MDT where there might be people of very differing education levels) all members need to ensure that the language they use and method of communicating with each other allows everyone to fully understand what's going on. An example of where this can go wrong is where you have two consultants on the team using a load of medical acronyms and abbreviations which make sense to them, but not to anyone else on the team.

The irony of these sentences all being about 'effective communication' when they're written in this opaque, unnecessary language is hilarious! You should point this out to your tutor.

Any more you want translating?
Oh, i understand finally. thank you again.

YES! I have pointed it out to my teacher but she keeps dodging the question.

And this?

Managers have strategies to sustain and augment trust, respect and support between partners, backed up by procedures and practices.
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(Original post by PatriciaBright)
Oh, i understand finally. thank you again.

YES! I have pointed it out to my teacher but she keeps dodging the question.

And this?

Managers have strategies to sustain and augment trust, respect and support between partners, backed up by procedures and practices.
Great

That sentence essentially says that managers manage things! More concretely, a manager knows how to ensure interpersonal relationships between members of the team are harmonious, and work well. A manager will also have specific procedures which he or she will follow if things go wrong. So a good manager will know how to make sure all team members feel valued and respected, have their voice heard and can ask for support when needed. A manager will also have a defined process to follow when his/her staff have a problem, either individually or with another member of the team.
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Oxford Mum
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Unfortunately these convoluted sentences are enough to put students off their studies

Haven’t they heard of the plain English campaign?
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