Woman blocks train doors

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MarcusPotter
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A few weeks ago, I got off a train at Wymondham, and started walking towards the station exit, at which point I noticed a chavette running down the footbridge, whilst her partner with what appeared to be a special pushchair (for a disabled child) was stood on the top of the footbridge. I told the chavette to jump on, at which point she mentioned something about a disabled child. I assumed that the disabled child was ALREADY on the train, at which point I went down the footbridge, and tried to get the attention of the train driver, at which point he exited the cab and talked to her. An off duty cleaner then told me to "come on" i.e. just carry on walking out of the station, and leave the driver to it. At which point, the driver presumably told her to just get her disabled child on to the train, and get on without further dilly dallying. So in spite of the fact that neither the child, nor her partner were on the platform, she then tried to do just that. At which point, as the train was already made late by the chavette's antics the driver decided "**** it, it's time to depart, so I will just close the doors, and depart the station", and then he did. She then retorted with a loud "**** YOU THEN!", and I then left the station, prior to walking home. Who was in the right? I think that the driver was 100% in the right because if she didn't have time to get her disabled child onto the train without delaying it, then she should have either 1) booked a taxi to Attleborough, crossed the line, and then got it from the station car park 2) booked assistance or 3) just got the special pushchair, herself, and her partner down the footbridge, and jumped onto the next available Ely bound train, or 4) just crossed the line onto the other platform, and then jumped onto the next available Norwich bound train from there, or 5) just turned up on time in the first place.
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Hope5677
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I don't know . Seems mean of the driver. But i don't know. Since the lady knows it's a struggle to get on trains she should have definitely planned to arrive on time. But very weird driver can't have pity on a family with a disabled child. Very rare to see such unsympathetic behaviour
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MarcusPotter
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(Original post by Hope5677)
I don't know . Seems mean of the driver. But i don't know. Since the lady knows it's a struggle to get on trains she should have definitely planned to arrive on time. But very weird driver can't have pity on a family with a disabled child. Very rare to see such unsympathetic behaviour
The driver has to depart every station on time ASAP. Any issue should be taken up with his employer in my opinion which would be Greater Anglia.
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Hope5677
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(Original post by MarcusPotter)
The driver has to depart every station on time ASAP. Any issue should be taken up with his employer in my opinion which would be Greater Anglia.
So why did you make this post? Lol

Are you the driver looking for sympathy online because of shunning a family with a disabled kid?
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MarcusPotter
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(Original post by Hope5677)
So why did you make this post? Lol

Are you the driver looking for sympathy online because of shunning a family with a disabled kid?
No I'm not even a member of Greater Anglia staff. I wanted people to give their opinions, and I can understand if you feel that the driver got it wrong.
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Hope5677
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(Original post by MarcusPotter)
No I'm not even a member of Greater Anglia staff. I wanted people to give their opinions, and I can understand if you feel that the driver got it wrong.
Lol i bet they'll fire him. Most employers now don't take too kindly to immoral behaviour. Though he has to keep to schedule in this case though there's a good excuse to delay by a few minutes. Very mean of the driver to try to leave instead of just helping this family out. Most companies are governed by ethics and morals pretty sure he would be warned if reported
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DiddyDec
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If you are late for the train you are probably going to miss it.
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MarcusPotter
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(Original post by DiddyDec)
If you are late for the train you are probably going to miss it.
Yes you are 100% right. The driver was well within his rights to ask the woman to leave the train, which he did. She was then obliged to move. She refused to move. That constituted trespass which is a criminal offence. He then asked her to either board the train, or to leave the train immediately. She relucantly left the train with the intent of getting her child down from the footbridge. The driver then had every right to depart the station on time, and to leave the trespasser on the platform where she belonged, rather than waiting for her to board the train which would have delayed the service even more.
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MarcusPotter
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(Original post by Hope5677)
Lol i bet they'll fire him. Most employers now don't take too kindly to immoral behaviour. Though he has to keep to schedule in this case though there's a good excuse to delay by a few minutes. Very mean of the driver to try to leave instead of just helping this family out. Most companies are governed by ethics and morals pretty sure he would be warned if reported
I'd suggest that you contact Greater Anglia and make a complaint then. That said, I doubt that he'll be disciplined. Let alone sacked. Whilst there is an arguable prima facie case for this being immoral behaviour, such a case is fatally flawed on the basis that a late running train will cause a range of issues, including the risk of a SPAD (Signal Passed At Danger) incident in the rear. A SPAD is a "safety of the line incident", and for good reason. Just look at the 31 fatalities, and numerous injuries which occured as a result of SPAD incidents in the past e.g. at Ladbroke Grove in 1999, and another 6 fatalities at Southall in 1997, etc.

Such issues and ramifications outweigh the positive impact and benefits of waiting for those passengers to board the train, even for just a few minutes. This applies even with a "good excuse", but nevertheless I doubt that they even had a "good excuse" personally. The driver wasn't even being "mean" in the slightest by departing the station on time and leaving a trespasser on the platform on in my opinion. By the same logic should driver be obliged to transport trespassers that they encounter between stations? Of course not. They have absolutely no right to be there for a start, let alone any right whatsoever to travel by rail.

Greater Anglia are indeed governed by ethics and morals to a certain degree, but even the most ethical and decent TOCs (Train Operating Companies) won't warn a driver for that. He hasn't done anything wrong to start with. Had he attempted to make a citizen's arrest, and then forced her onto the train, before departing Wymondham, whilst leaving her partner and child on the platform, then that would've been a very different matter. Especially given that trespass on a railway is a summary only offence, and not an indictable offence. Even then, the driver would be looking at disciplinary action as his job is to drive the train, not enforce the law. Not to mention the issue of leaving a disabled child on the platform with only one responsible adult, and no step-free access.
Last edited by MarcusPotter; 3 weeks ago
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