Sieauen Roziaeh
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Please, will someone kindly take the time and effort to explain The Brittish system of Government, let's say from when Brittan was a true Royal Monarchy, along with the Parliment , The House of Lord's, The House Commons, even the Tory Party, I have heard or have read rather about the Colonial Tory's of the American Colonial (Revolutionary) Armed Dispute (War).
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Oscarisapenguin2
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(Original post by Sieauen Roziaeh)
Please, will someone kindly take the time and effort to explain The Brittish system of Government, let's say from when Brittan was a true Royal Monarchy, along with the Parliment , The House of Lord's, The House Commons, even the Tory Party, I have heard or have read rather about the Colonial Tory's of the American Colonial (Revolutionary) Armed Dispute (War).
That's quite a wide scope!!
I have some notes on constitutional reform which might cover some of that?
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ByEeek
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Um. Isn't that the purpose of the essay you have to write? You take the time to read and learn, then put your findings down in the form of an essay?

How would someone else doing that for you be of any benefit to you?
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Oscarisapenguin2
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(Original post by ByEeek)
Um. Isn't that the purpose of the essay you have to write? You take the time to read and learn, then put your findings down in the form of an essay?

How would someone else doing that for you be of any benefit to you?
Are they asking about an essay? I thought they’re just generally curious
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G-Wizzle
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Atm,
We have a constitutional monarchy - the monarch's power is pretty much just for show. Monarch signs new legislation into law once it has passed through both houses, and can dissolve parliament before a Queen's Speech (which usually happens once a year). This allows government a period of a week or two to prepare its agenda for the forthcoming parliamentary session.

Two houses of parliament - House of Lords and House of Commons. Legislation must receive a majority in both of these to become law.
The House of Lords is made up of 794 seats, of which most have been chosen, because of their service to the country (eg: Lord Andrew Lloyd Webber wrote a load of musicals), though a few hereditary seats remain (where the lordship is passed down the family line) - this is as batsh*t crazy as it sounds. Many belong to parties, many remain independent. House of Lords only really has the power to amend or delay legislation, before sending it back to the Commons.

House of Commons is the main legislative body in the UK, made up of 650 members of parliament, each elected by a certain area (constituency). The Commons is made up of the government and the opposition. The party with the most seats is usually the government (unless a coalition of parties controls more). The leader of this party, who must sit in the House of Commons (it has happened occasionally that this individual is a Lord), becomes Prime Minister, and they may select other members of parliament to form their cabinet. Each member of the cabinet controls a government department, eg: Chancellor controls the Treasury. Whilst any MP may submit a bill (a piece of legislation before it becomes law) for consideration, the government may not grant it time to be discussed.

Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have their own devolved parliaments, as well as representation in the Commons. These are elected in separate elections to the UK-wide general elections.

Main Parties:
Main parties emerged from English Civil War in 17th century. Royalists/Cavaliers (supporters of the total monarchy) emerged as the Tories, and the Roundheads (supporters of a parliament and constitutional monarchy) emerged as the Whigs. Both were relatively conservative, but Whigs were generally more pro reform. By the end of 19th century, these had evolved into the Conservatives and Liberals respectively, though Conservatives are still referred to as Tories.
Up to 1900-ish, Parliament was dominated by the Tories and the Whigs (became Conservatives and Liberals, though Conservatives are still referred to as the 'Tories').
Labour emerged as the socialist party of the working class at the dawn of the 20th century, committed to Clause IV (nationalisation of industry). By the Second World War, Labour had replaced the Liberals as the main opposition to the Tories.
In 1980s, a group of unhappy Labour MPs formed the centre-left Social Democratic Party, which merged with the Liberals to form the Liberal Democrats at the end of the decade.




Current state of the parties:

Tories (365 seats)
Economically liberal - little state intervention. Historically, differing views on trade, but since Boris Johnson's took control - nationalist. Slight majority in favour to Brexit, but Remainers have now been kicked out, resigned, or are hiding and weeping.

Lib Dems (11 seats):
Centrist, but very socially liberal. Internationalist. Had around 60 seats until 2015, but their support of Tory cuts to spending during coalition hurt them greatly.

Labour (202 seats)
Broad church. Controlled by socialists atm, but many are more centre-left. Socially liberal. Mixed views on free trade, but generally anti-Brexit.


SNP (47 seats):
Left-wing, socially liberal, Scottish independence.

Then a load of smaller parties: Greens, Sinn Fein (Irish Nationalists), DUP (right-wing Irish unionists), Plaid Cymru (left-wing Welsh nationalists), etc.

If US politicians moved to UK:
Reps. would flock to Tories, though would be cross about the Tories' attitudes to guns.

Democrats would prob split three ways. Clinton might end up on the left of the Tory Party, Obama might join Lib Dems, Bernie and Liz Warren would join Labour.

Hope this helps. Happy to answer any Qs.
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ByEeek
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(Original post by Oscarisapenguin2)
Are they asking about an essay? I thought they’re just generally curious
Rather too specific for curiosity. It reads like and essay assignment to me.
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Sieauen Roziaeh
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(Original post by G-Wizzle)
Atm,
We have a constitutional monarchy - the monarch's power is pretty much just for show. Monarch signs new legislation into law once it has passed through both houses, and can dissolve parliament before a Queen's Speech (which usually happens once a year). This allows government a period of a week or two to prepare its agenda for the forthcoming parliamentary session.

Two houses of parliament - House of Lords and House of Commons. Legislation must receive a majority in both of these to become law.
The House of Lords is made up of 794 seats, of which most have been chosen, because of their service to the country (eg: Lord Andrew Lloyd Webber wrote a load of musicals), though a few hereditary seats remain (where the lordship is passed down the family line) - this is as batsh*t crazy as it sounds. Many belong to parties, many remain independent. House of Lords only really has the power to amend or delay legislation, before sending it back to the Commons.

House of Commons is the main legislative body in the UK, made up of 650 members of parliament, each elected by a certain area (constituency). The Commons is made up of the government and the opposition. The party with the most seats is usually the government (unless a coalition of parties controls more). The leader of this party, who must sit in the House of Commons (it has happened occasionally that this individual is a Lord), becomes Prime Minister, and they may select other members of parliament to form their cabinet. Each member of the cabinet controls a government department, eg: Chancellor controls the Treasury. Whilst any MP may submit a bill (a piece of legislation before it becomes law) for consideration, the government may not grant it time to be discussed.

Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have their own devolved parliaments, as well as representation in the Commons. These are elected in separate elections to the UK-wide general elections.

Main Parties:
Main parties emerged from English Civil War in 17th century. Royalists/Cavaliers (supporters of the total monarchy) emerged as the Tories, and the Roundheads (supporters of a parliament and constitutional monarchy) emerged as the Whigs. Both were relatively conservative, but Whigs were generally more pro reform. By the end of 19th century, these had evolved into the Conservatives and Liberals respectively, though Conservatives are still referred to as Tories.
Up to 1900-ish, Parliament was dominated by the Tories and the Whigs (became Conservatives and Liberals, though Conservatives are still referred to as the 'Tories').
Labour emerged as the socialist party of the working class at the dawn of the 20th century, committed to Clause IV (nationalisation of industry). By the Second World War, Labour had replaced the Liberals as the main opposition to the Tories.
In 1980s, a group of unhappy Labour MPs formed the centre-left Social Democratic Party, which merged with the Liberals to form the Liberal Democrats at the end of the decade.




Current state of the parties:

Tories (365 seats)
Economically liberal - little state intervention. Historically, differing views on trade, but since Boris Johnson's took control - nationalist. Slight majority in favour to Brexit, but Remainers have now been kicked out, resigned, or are hiding and weeping.

Lib Dems (11 seats):
Centrist, but very socially liberal. Internationalist. Had around 60 seats until 2015, but their support of Tory cuts to spending during coalition hurt them greatly.

Labour (202 seats)
Broad church. Controlled by socialists atm, but many are more centre-left. Socially liberal. Mixed views on free trade, but generally anti-Brexit.


SNP (47 seats):
Left-wing, socially liberal, Scottish independence.

Then a load of smaller parties: Greens, Sinn Fein (Irish Nationalists), DUP (right-wing Irish unionists), Plaid Cymru (left-wing Welsh nationalists), etc.

If US politicians moved to UK:
Reps. would flock to Tories, though would be cross about the Tories' attitudes to guns.

Democrats would prob split three ways. Clinton might end up on the left of the Tory Party, Obama might join Lib Dems, Bernie and Liz Warren would join Labour.

Hope this helps. Happy to answer any Qs.
Yes this does. Though it is not for a college for which I am writing this "essay", but for an interesting and interested group of individuals ad we
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