how to revise a level sociology!?!

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OzzMorris
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I'm really struggling with sociology. I'm in year 12 and have never gotten above a D in soc. I dont know how to efficiently revise the views (functionalist, new right etc) or how to learn names. I also do psych and find it much easier. Any tips?!
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_xChlox_
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What exam board are you on? The best way to revise is past paper or potential questions/essay plans
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Ferrograd
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I use quizlet. My username is tacticalx86. Have a look through my flashcards and questions; you may need to customise it so it is configured right depending on how you want to use it. If you dont like mine, make your own with quizlet. honestly i dont know how i would have passed my gcses never mind revised for my a levels without it.

also i just sometimes write down all the theorists, and then group them into topic eg education and then maybe just put next to them what perspective or a little bit about them.
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LaurenEve1995
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Essay structure tip:

P - Point
E - Explain
E - Evaluate
L - Link

The 'PEEL' method Is something I always used to use during my A level studies in both exams and essays. I'd write down 4-5 main POINTS that i wanted to discuss/argue (of course this will depend on essay length),

EXPLAIN the points,

EVALUATE < this is where you're going to pick up marks and get those top grades. If you can effectively explain your point but show you recognise and understand conflicting arguments then this is going to reflect analytical, critical thought which is extremely important. (bonus if you can critique theories/studies and analysis their strengths/weaknesses/limitations) But you need to not only show you are aware of conflicting arguments but that you can then use your rationale to justify the overall line of argument that would've highlighted in an introduction.

LINK - After every point you need to make sure you link it back to the exam title/question and answer it, even if its a couple of precise sentences.

CONCLUSION - do not add any new information here, summarise the main points and provide an overall answer to the essay question making sure you highlight your rationale behind how you got to that conclusion.

And of course use references throughout... books, journals, the lot! (keeping on top of reading and current affairs is the most important thing you can do)

In terms of remember theories etc. I used to create flash cards that included a very brief over view of the theory. In an exam you don't have to necessarily go into lots and lots of detail but by creating flashcards they allow you to simplify things so the most important points become memorable. When you remember the surface key points of each theory you are then able to compare and contrast them against each other a little easier without focusing on too much detail. Exams are more about your argument/structure/showing a general understanding not so much specific granular details.

I have a first class sociology degree and social research masters and this has always worked for me... hope this helps!
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OzzMorris
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(Original post by LaurenEve1995)
Essay structure tip:

P - Point
E - Explain
E - Evaluate
L - Link

The 'PEEL' method Is something I always used to use during my A level studies in both exams and essays. I'd write down 4-5 main POINTS that i wanted to discuss/argue (of course this will depend on essay length),

EXPLAIN the points,

EVALUATE < this is where you're going to pick up marks and get those top grades. If you can effectively explain your point but show you recognise and understand conflicting arguments then this is going to reflect analytical, critical thought which is extremely important. (bonus if you can critique theories/studies and analysis their strengths/weaknesses/limitations) But you need to not only show you are aware of conflicting arguments but that you can then use your rationale to justify the overall line of argument that would've highlighted in an introduction.

LINK - After every point you need to make sure you link it back to the exam title/question and answer it, even if its a couple of precise sentences.

CONCLUSION - do not add any new information here, summarise the main points and provide an overall answer to the essay question making sure you highlight your rationale behind how you got to that conclusion.

And of course use references throughout... books, journals, the lot! (keeping on top of reading and current affairs is the most important thing you can do)

In terms of remember theories etc. I used to create flash cards that included a very brief over view of the theory. In an exam you don't have to necessarily go into lots and lots of detail but by creating flashcards they allow you to simplify things so the most important points become memorable. When you remember the surface key points of each theory you are then able to compare and contrast them against each other a little easier without focusing on too much detail. Exams are more about your argument/structure/showing a general understanding not so much specific granular details.

I have a first class sociology degree and social research masters and this has always worked for me... hope this helps!
Omg this is great thank you! I did psych at GCSE but I always struggled with peels, and I never started writing them in my exams u til the start of this year in year 12 (I know it's very detrimental to my grades...) At a level, can I evaluate both positive and negative points? because at GCSE I only criticised and I dint know if its changed. and we also do 'whopper peels' where the other E means Methodological evaluation which is also very confusing. And I have started making flashcards, it's okay right now because I've just started a new.topic but I'm worried as i get more into the topic i wont be able to remember everything
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melisss22
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Hey, I was in your place 3 years ago too haha. I only got Ds in my essays and mocks but pulled an B in my A2. What I did was make flashcards on specific writers and do a lot of essays. I did AQA and almost always flopped on the 10 markers so I made sure I was able to ace them before the exams. Try to do questions and ask your teacher to mark and give feedback, I’m sure you’ll do much better in your exams.
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LaurenEve1995
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(Original post by OzzMorris)
Omg this is great thank you! I did psych at GCSE but I always struggled with peels, and I never started writing them in my exams u til the start of this year in year 12 (I know it's very detrimental to my grades...) At a level, can I evaluate both positive and negative points? because at GCSE I only criticised and I dint know if its changed. and we also do 'whopper peels' where the other E means Methodological evaluation which is also very confusing. And I have started making flashcards, it's okay right now because I've just started a new.topic but I'm worried as i get more into the topic i wont be able to remember everything
You can evaluate both positive and negative (critical thought isn't just being negative its having a well rounded overview and then using your own rationale to come to a sound conclusion which can be in favour of a theory/study/method etc.or against it)

I'd go into more detail in this with your essays rather than exams. If the exam question is say a 30 marker then you've got some room to do so but it can be just as simple as a a couple of sentences.

Yes flashcards really helped me! Another think that helped me was creating 'linking' flashcards so i'd create a flash card that i could link with another as a critique e.g. 'Functionalists believe X' however in contrast 'Marxism believe Y, Postmodernism in contrast argue Z' this allowed me to remember both theory and study and have arguments already in my head.

There is so much information i think its important to not try and learn every detail, when it comes to exams try and remember key points of each theory, method, study... you're going to have to tailor your answer to the exam question anyway! I always went in making sure i understood as my theories as they are pretty flexible in the way you can tie them into to an answer.
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